Histories of the Electron: The Birth of Microphysics

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $13.97
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 48%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $13.97   
  • New (6) from $19.98   
  • Used (3) from $13.97   

Overview

In the mid to late 1890s, J. J. Thomson and colleagues at Cambridge's Cavendish Laboratory conducted experiments on "cathode rays" (a form of radiation produced within evacuated glass vessels subjected to electric fields) — the results of which some historians later viewed as the "discovery" of the electron. This book is both a biography of the electron and a history of the microphysical world that it opened up.The book is organized in four parts. The first part, Corpuscles and Electrons, considers the varying accounts of Thomson's role in the experimental production of the electron. The second part, What Was the Newborn Electron Good For?, examines how scientists used the new entity in physical and chemical investigations. The third part, Electrons Applied and Appropriated, explores the accommodation, or lack thereof, of the electron in nuclear physics, chemistry, and electrical science. It follows the electron's gradual progress from cathode ray to ubiquitous subatomic particle and eponymous entity in one of the world's most successful industries — electronics. The fourth part, Philosophical Electrons,considers the role of the electron in issues of instrumentalism, epistemology, and realism. The electron, it turns out, can tell us a great deal about how science works.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Jed Z. Buchwald is Director of the Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology and Bern Dibner Professor of the History of Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Andrew Warwick is Lecturer in the History of Science at Imperial College,London.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction 1
1 J. J. Thomson and the Electron, 1897-1899 21
2 Corpuscles to Electrons 77
3 The Questionable Matter of Electricity: The Reception of J. J. Thomson's "Corpuscle" among Electrical Theorists and Technologists 101
4 Paul Villard, J. J. Thomson, and the Composition of Cathode Rays 135
5 The Zeeman Effect and the Discovery of the Electron 171
6 The Electron, the Protyle, and the Unity of Matter 195
7 O. W. Richardson and the Electron Theory of Matter, 1901-1916 227
8 Electron Gas Theory of Metals: Free Electrons in Bulk Matter 255
9 The Electron and the Nucleus 307
10 The Electron, the Hole, and the Transistor 327
11 Remodeling a Classic: The Electron in Organic Chemistry, 1900-1940 339
12 The Physicists' Electron and Its Appropriation by the Chemists 363
13 Who Really Discovered the Electron? 403
14 History and Metaphysics: On the Reality of Spin 425
15 What Should Philosophers of Science Learn from the History of the Electron? 451
16 The Role of Theory in the Use of Instruments; or, How Much Do We Need to Know about Electrons to Do Science with an Electron Microscope? 467
Index 503
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)