History Chapters: Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott Race to the South Pole

History Chapters: Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott Race to the South Pole

by Gare Thompson
     
 

Two men! One dream! Which one will become the first to reach the South Pole and bring the honor and glory home to their country? Trek along the route of discovery and adventure, deep into Antarctic wastelands. Relive the harrowing trials of Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott in a story of soaring triumph and bleak tragedy. Young readers will follow this race to

Overview

Two men! One dream! Which one will become the first to reach the South Pole and bring the honor and glory home to their country? Trek along the route of discovery and adventure, deep into Antarctic wastelands. Relive the harrowing trials of Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott in a story of soaring triumph and bleak tragedy. Young readers will follow this race to greatness all the way to the ends of the Earth.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
AGERANGE: Ages 7 to 10.

This chapter book, appropriate for second and third grade readers, tells the story of the two great rivals in the race to reach the South Pole. Norwegian Amundsen, experienced both in skiing and in the use of sled dogs, triumphed on December 13, 1911. Englishman Scott, who relied instead on gasoline-powered sleds and ponies, reached the pole on January 17, 1912, only to find Amundsen's tent and flag awaiting him. Weak, starving, freezing, and heartbroken, Scott's party never returned, perishing in the snow. Thompson is a capable narrator, though the text is occasionally a bit flat. "Scott and his team were disappointed" to find that Amundsen had beat them to the pole is certainly a cruel understatement. The ending, however, is lovely, a brief portrait of Antarctica today: "Antarctica is the only continent that is not a nation or made up of a group of nations. Roald Amundsen may have been there first, but today the South Pole belongs to the world." As one would expect from a National Geographic publication, the illustrations are superb, from endpapers picturing an ice shelf in the spring twilight, to fascinating historical photographs of the two expeditions, to a closing scene of contemporary tourists admiring thousands of penguins. Includes glossary, suggestions for further reading (books and web sites), index, and suggestions about "How to Write an A+ Report." Reviewer: Claudia Mills, Ph.D.

School Library Journal

Gr 2-4
These books focus on their subjects' accomplishments rather than on their personal lives. Nicely illustrated with photos, paintings, engravings, and facsimiles, they are just right for emerging chapter-book readers. The vocabulary is easy, and the sentence structure is simple and a little clipped. The words from the glossary appear within the text in regular type, not bold. The Web sites mentioned are all high quality. Each book also has a spread entitled "How to Write an A+ Report" that lists seven steps, from choosing a topic to submitting the final product. Useful titles for reports requiring information about accomplishments, and interesting pleasure reading.
—Lynda RittermanCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426301872
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
10/09/2007
Series:
History Chapters Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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