History: A Very Short Introduction / Edition 1 by John H. Arnold | 9781402782046 | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
History

History

3.8 6
by John H. Arnold
     
 

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Do historians reconstruct the truth—or simply tell stories? Professor John Arnold suggests they do both, and that it’s the balance between the two that matters. In a work of metahistory (the study of history itself), he takes us from the fabulous tales of Greek Herodotus to the varied approaches of modern-day professionals. Through fascinating and

Overview

Do historians reconstruct the truth—or simply tell stories? Professor John Arnold suggests they do both, and that it’s the balance between the two that matters. In a work of metahistory (the study of history itself), he takes us from the fabulous tales of Greek Herodotus to the varied approaches of modern-day professionals. Through fascinating and particular examples—including a medieval murderer, 17th-century colonist, and ex-slave—Dr. Arnold illuminates our relationship to the past by making us aware of how the very nature of “history” has changed.

 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402782046
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
12/07/2010
Series:
A Brief Insight
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
706,653
File size:
21 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

JOHN H. ARNOLD teaches history at the University of East Anglia, specializing in the medieval period and the philosophy of history. He has written over ten books, including his most recent: What Is Medieval History? (Polity, 2008).

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History 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Michlren More than 1 year ago
Arnold's aptly titled work would be useful for an introductory undergraduate class, especially one that is aimed at giving students an overview of historiography and some of the discussions going on in the field up to the '80s (for after that it gets too "complicated" for Arnold to deal with). As a text for a grad class it is inadequate and simplistic. For people not in school, this would be also be useful. His writing is clear, concise, and immensely readable, something that cannot be said for other academics writing overviews.
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