History Of Amer Lit Journalism

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Overview

During the 1960s, such works as Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem were cited as examples of the "new journalism." True stories that read like novels, they combined the journalist's task of factual reporting with the art of fictional narration.

Yet as John C. Hartsock shows in this revealing study, the roots of this distinctive form of writing-whether called new journalism, literary journalism, or creative nonfiction-can be traced at least as far back as the late nineteenth century. In the decades following the American Civil War, Stephen Crane, Lafcadio Hearn, and other journalists challenged the notion, then just emerging, that the reporter's job was to offer a concise statement of the "objective truth." Drawing on the techniques of the realistic novel, these writers developed a new narrative style of reporting aimed at lessening the distance between observer and observed, subject and object.

By the 1890s, Hartsock argues, literary journalism had achieved critical recognition as a new form of writing, different not only from "objective" reporting but also from the sensationalistic "yellow press" and at times the socially engaged "muckrakers." In the twentieth century, the form has continued to evolve and maintain its vitality, despite being marginalized by the academic establishment.

A former journalist who covered Capitol Hill for UPI and reported on the collapse of the Soviet Union for the San Francisco Examiner, Hartsock brings a fresh and informed perspective to the issues he examines. The result is a concise introduction to the genesis and development of a significant literary genre.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
According to Hartsock (communication studies, SUNY at Cortland), scholars have not given enough attention to the genre of literary journalism, and the purpose of this book is to fill that gap. Refuting the popular belief that Truman Capote's In Cold Blood was the first example of literary nonfiction, Hartsock argues that this form of writing first appeared in the 19th century, when writers like Stephen Crane and Lafcadio Hearn began to change the way journalists reported the truth by bringing the reader and the subject closer together when writing about slavery, travel, crime, and biography. Hartsock quotes many examples and establishes an important argument that will be distinguished for its breadth and exacting scholarship. Since this book is aimed at scholars, graduate students, and other serious writers, it will prove most useful in academic libraries.--Lisa J. Cihlar, Monroe P.L., WI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Booknews
Aiming to provide a history of and contextualize a literary form he calls literary journalism, Hartsock (communication studies, SUNY Cortland) provides evidence of the emergence of a "modern" American literary journalism; discusses reasons for the form's emergence and epistemological consequences; describes antecedents to the form; analyzes how to distinguish it from other nonfiction forms; offers post-fin de si<`e>cle evidence of the form up to the 1960s; and offers reasons for its critical marginalization. Intended for graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and journalists. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781558492523
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press
  • Publication date: 1/11/2001
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

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