A History of Argentina in the Twentieth Century / Edition 1

A History of Argentina in the Twentieth Century / Edition 1

1.0 1
by Luis Alberto Romero
     
 

ISBN-10: 0271021926

ISBN-13: 9780271021928

Pub. Date: 03/28/2002

Publisher: Penn State University Press

A History of Argentina in the Twentieth Century, originally published in Buenos Aires in 1994, attained instantaneous status as a classic. Written as an introductory text for university students and the general public, it is a profound reflection on the "Argentine dilemma" and the challenges that the country faces as it tries to rebuild democracy. In

Overview

A History of Argentina in the Twentieth Century, originally published in Buenos Aires in 1994, attained instantaneous status as a classic. Written as an introductory text for university students and the general public, it is a profound reflection on the "Argentine dilemma" and the challenges that the country faces as it tries to rebuild democracy. In the book, Romero painstakingly and brilliantly reconstructs and analyzes Argentina’s tortuous, often tragic modern history, from the "alluvial society" born of mass immigration, to the dramatic years of Juan and Eva Perón, to the recent period of military dictatorship and democracy. For this first English-language edition, Romero has written a new chapter covering the decade of the 1990s. A rare book combining great erudition with an engaging narrative, it is destined to be the standard English-language history of Argentina for many years to come.

The son of Argentina’s greatest twentieth-century historian, José Luis Romero, Luis Alberto Romero has emerged as one of the leading historians of his generation in Argentina. Romero’s generation is one that has witnessed the most dramatic decades of the country’s modern history, the decline of Argentina and its descent into violence, dictatorship, and despair, but also the hopeful if often difficult process of rebuilding democracy since the mid-1980s. Combining the rigor of the professional historian with a passionate commitment to his country’s future, Romero’s work is a major contribution to our understanding of one of Latin America’s most important nations. This translation by James Brennan, himself a leading English-speaking historian of Argentina, makes this valuable book available to a wide readership in the United States and elsewhere in the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780271021928
Publisher:
Penn State University Press
Publication date:
03/28/2002
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Prefaceix
Preface to the English-Language Editionxiii
119161
2The Radical Governments, 1916-193027
3The Conservative Restoration, 1930-194359
4The Peron Government, 1943-195591
5The Stalemate, 1955-1966131
6Dependency or Liberation, 1966-1976173
7The "Process," 1976-1983215
8Advance and Retreat, 1983-1989255
9The Great Transformation, 1989-1999285
Epilogue: The New Argentina319
Postcript: January 2002333
Glossary of Spanish Terms351
Bibliography353
Index365

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A History of Argentina in the Twentieth Century 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This unreadable 'history' rambles from unconnected thought to unconnected thought, absolutely lacking chronology, wasting my reading time in a confused miasma of intellectual posturing. Pity the poor History 1A student assigned this text. A typical sentence: 'The rupture between the most progressive sector of the intellectuals and their more conservative allies in the anti-Peronist front, foreshadowed since before 1955, became manifest almost immediately after Peron's overthrow, by virtue of the antipopular and repressive tactics of 'Liberating Revolution', above all because of intellectuals's self-guilt about the lack of understanding...blah, blah, blah. The only liberating virtue about this book, is putting it down for good and watching a re-run of the Beverly Hillbillys. At least the plot makes sense, which is more than this book did. After fifty pages of this book, I had no idea what went on, so I gave up. One star is generous.