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A history of Germany; from the earliest period to the present time
     

A history of Germany; from the earliest period to the present time

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by Friedrich Kohlrausch
 

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
THE HUNNS. 79 CHAPTER HI. 375—476. The Ilunns—Commencement of the Great Migration, 375—Irruption of the Western Goths, Vandals, Suevi, Burgundians, and other

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
THE HUNNS. 79 CHAPTER HI. 375—476. The Ilunns—Commencement of the Great Migration, 375—Irruption of the Western Goths, Vandals, Suevi, Burgundians, and other tribes, into the Western Roman Empire—Alaric—Attila, God's Scourge, 451—The Fall of the Roman Empire in the West, 476. About the year 375, when the Emperor Valens reigned in Constantinople, and the western empire was under the dominion of his nephew, the youthful Gratian, a new tribe, almost unknown and exceedingly savage, broke forth from Asia. They were not of German but of Mongolian origin, and were called Hunns. Terror and dread preceded them, and those who had seen them described them in the following terms:" The tribe called Hunns surpass every degree of savageness. They have firm-set limbs and thick necks, and their whole figure is so mis-shapen and broad, that they might be considered as two-legged monsters, or as posts that have been roughly hewn to support the balustrades of bridges. And as, immediately after their birth, deep incisions are made in the cheeks of their children, so that the growth of hair may be hindered by cicatrising the wounds, they remain beardless and most hateful to behold, even to the most advanced period of life. In addition to their ill- favoured and repulsive shapes they arc so savage that they neither need fire, nor cook their victuals; but the roots of wild plants and the half raw flesh of the first good animal they meet with, and which they place beneath them upon the backs of their horses and thus ride it somewhat tender, is their whole sustenance. They enter houses only when they are forced by the most extreme necessity; they avoid them as the separated graves of life, but wandering through mountains and valleys, they learn to endure, from their infancy, frost, hunger, and ...

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BN ID:
2940018379768
Publisher:
London, Chapman and Hall
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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THE HUNNS. 79 CHAPTER HI. 375476. The IlunnsCommencement of the Great Migration, 375Irruption of the Western Goths, Vandals, Suevi, Burgundians, and other tribes, into the Western Roman EmpireAlaricAttila, God's Scourge, 451The Fall of the Roman Empire in the West, 476. About the year 375, when the Emperor Valens reigned in Constantinople, and the western empire was under the dominion of his nephew, the youthful Gratian, a new tribe, almost unknown and exceedingly savage, broke forth from Asia. They were not of German but of Mongolian origin, and were called Hunns. Terror and dread preceded them, and those who had seen them described them in the following terms:" The tribe called Hunns surpass every degree of savageness. They have firm-set limbs and thick necks, and their whole figure is so mis-shapen and broad, that they might be considered as two-legged monsters, or as posts that have been roughly hewn to support the balustrades of bridges. And as, immediately after their birth, deep incisions are made in the cheeks of their children, so that the growth of hair may be hindered by cicatrising the wounds, they remain beardless and most hateful to behold, even to the most advanced period of life. In addition to their ill- favoured and repulsive shapes they arc so savage that they neither need fire, nor cook their victuals; but the roots of wild plants and the half raw flesh of the first good animal they meet with, and which they place beneath them upon the backs of their horses and thus ride it somewhat tender, is their whole sustenance. They enter houses only when they are forced by the most extreme necessity; they avoid them as the separated graves of life, but wanderingthrough mountains and valleys, they learn to endure, from their infancy, frost, hunger, and ...

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A history of Germany; from the earliest period to the present Time 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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