History of Japanese Art / Edition 2

History of Japanese Art / Edition 2

by Penelope Mason
     
 

Published jointly by Prentice Hall and Harry N. Abrams, Inc., this second edition of the comprehensive history of Japanese art from 10,500 B.C.E. now extends beyond 1945, tying together more closely the development of all the media within a well-articulated historical and social context. Features a comprehensive survey of Japanese art and culture

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Overview

Published jointly by Prentice Hall and Harry N. Abrams, Inc., this second edition of the comprehensive history of Japanese art from 10,500 B.C.E. now extends beyond 1945, tying together more closely the development of all the media within a well-articulated historical and social context. Features a comprehensive survey of Japanese art and culture, now with 67 new color and 52 new black and white illustrations including other art forms such as calligraphy, lacquer, metalwares, ceramics, and textiles. For art enthusiasts interested in far eastern art.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780131176010
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
09/28/2004
Edition description:
Revised Edition
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
224,705
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Preface

Map of Japan

1. The Birth of Japan.

The Neolithic Jomon and the ProtohistoricYayoi and Kofun Periods.

Out of Myth and into the Archaeological Record.

The Jomon Period (c. 11,000-400 B.C.E.)

Incipient (c. 11.0008.000 B.C.E.) and Initial Jomon (c. 8000-5000 B.C.E.) phases.

Early Jomon (c. 5000-2500 B.C.E.) phase.

Middle Jomon (c. 2500-1500 B.C.E.) phase.

Late (c.1500-1000 B.C.E.) and Final Jomon (c. 1000-400 B.C.E.) phases.

The Yayoi Period (c. 400 B.C.E.-300 C.E.)

The Three Sacred Treasures.

Do taku.

Ceramics.

The Kofun Period (300-710 C.E.)

Haniwa .

Mirrors.

Other Grave Goods.

Ornamented Tombs.

2. Imperial Models.

The Impact of China and Buddhisni ofro Japan.

Centralization of Power.

Beginnings of a Metropolitan Court Culture.

The Creation of an Imperial City.

The Introduction of Writing.

Silk Roads to Japan.

Decorative Arts (sixth to eighth centuries).

Shinto.

Shinto Architecture.

Buddhism.

Buddhism's Introduction to Japan.

Architecture.

Horyuji.

Yakushiji.

Kofukuji.

Todaiji: The Nation's Temple.

Toshodaiji.

Tori Busshi and Asuka-Period Sculpture (552-645).

Asuka Painting: The Tamamushi Shrine.

Hakuho Sculpture: Horyuji.

Hakuho Painting.

HakuhM Sculpture: Yakushiji.

Early Nara Sculpture and Painting.

Mid-Nara Sculpture: Todaiji.

DRY-LACQUER AND CLAY SCULPTURE.

Arts of the Late-Nara Period.

3. Capital of Peace and Tranquillity.

The Heian Period anti the Caning of Age of a Native Aesthetic.

Overbearing Monks and Vengeful Ghosts.

Early Heian Period.

Middle Heian or Fujiwara Period.

Late Heian or Insei Period.

Rebellion.

The Arts in the Late Heian Period.

Heian and the Imperial Palace.

Life at Court.

Shinden.

Interior Decoration.

Gardens.

Literature and Calligraphy.

Poetry.

Women of Letters.

The Rise of Yamato-e.

EMAKIMONO AND PAPERMAKING.

Emakimono.

The Genji Monagatari emaki.

The Choju jinbutsu.

The Shigisan engi emaki.

The Ban Dainagon ekotoba.

Buddhist Arts.

Buddhism of the Tendai and Shingon Schools.

Shingon Architecture.

Shingon Mandala Paintings.

Early Portrait Painting.

Sculpture.

Temple Architecture.

Jinoji.

SINGLE-BLOCK AND MULTIPLE-BLOCK WOOD SCULPTURE.

Muroji.

Daigoji.

Fuda and the Godairiki Bosatsu.

Architecture of the Middle Heian.

The Phoenix Hall.

Independent Raigo Paintings.

Shaka Paintings.

Buddhist Temples of the Late Heian Period.

Joruriji.

Chusonji.

Sanju sangendo.

Late Heian Hanging Scrolls and Illustrated Sutras.

Shinto Arts.

4. Changing of the Guard.

The Rise of the Samurai and theTwiiight of the Imperial Order.

Cultural Flowering from Chaos and Upheaval.

End of an Epoch: The Hogen, Heiji, and Genpei Wars.

The First Shogun: Minamoto no Yoritomo.

Repairing the Damage: Cultural Revival in the Early Kamakura Period.

Decline into Perpetual Civil War: The Nambokucho and Muromachi Periods.

Rakucha Rakugai.

Decorative and Applied Arts.

Armor and Lacquerware.

Textiles.

Ceramics.

Literary and Calligraphic Arts of the Imperial Court.

Emakimono of the Medieval Period.

The Rebuilding of Todaiji and Kofukuji.

The Kei School of Sculptors.

The Revival of lingoji and Kozanji.

The Cult of Kukai and the Fashion for Chigo Imagery.

Pure Land Buddhism.

Pure Land Devotional Paintings.

Taima Mandara.

Raigo.

Rokudo-e.

Zen Buddhism.

The Aesthetics of Wabi.

The Zen Temple.

Zen Painting.

KAKEMONO AND INK PAINTING.

Ashikaga Patronage and the Arts.

The Development of Chanoyu.

Shinto.

5. Splendor Regained.

The Creative Revolution of tile Momayarna and Early Edo Periods.

From Azuchi to Momoyama.

Tokugawa Ascendancy.

Urbanization and the Seeds of Social Transformation.

Architecture.

Castles.

Shoin.

Katsura Imperial Villa.

Genre Painting.

FUSUMA, SCREENS, AND SHOJI.

Decorative and Applied Arts.

Ceramics.

Lacquerware.

Armor and Costume.

Painting.

The Kano School.

Kano Eitoku.

Kanb Mitsunobu.

Kano Sanraku.

Independent Masters of the Kanga Style.

Hasegawa Tohaku.

Kaiho Yusho.

Konoe Nabutada.

The Yamato-e Revival.

Sotatsu and Koetsu.

6. Pax Tokugawa.

Closed Borders, Official Orthodoxy, and the Inexorable Rise of Popular Culture in the Edo Period.

Confucianism and Social Stability.

A Bourgeois Paradise.

An Eclipse Long Deferred.

Images of the Floating World: Ukiyo-e.

Ukiyo-e Woodblock Prints.

Nishiki-e.

WOODBLOCK PRINTING.

Ukiyo-e Artists.

Torii Kiyonaga .

Tosusai Sharaku and Kitagawa Utamaro.

The Utagawa School.

Katsushika Hokusai.

Totoya Hokkei.

Ando Hiroshige.

Decorative and Applied Arts.

The Porcelain Revolution.

Arita.

Ko Kutani.

Kyoyaki: Independent Studio Potters.

Lacquerware.

Metalwork.

Textiles.

Buddhist Sacred Arts and Architecture.

Architecture.

Sculpture.

Other Buddhist Arts.

Developments in Painting.

KanoSchool.

Ogata Koin and the Rinpa School.

Realistic Schools of Painting: Yofuga and the Maruyama-Shijo School.

Yofuga.

Maruyama-Shijo School.

Eccentric Painters.

The Zenga Tradition.

Bunjinga.

Nankai, Kien, and Hyakusen.

Taiga and Buson.

Beisanjin and Gyokudo.

Chikuden, Chikuto, and Baiitsu.

Buncho and Kazan.

7. Forging a New Identity.

The Meiji Restoration) anti Japan's Entry into the Modern World.

The Meiji Restoration.

A Cultural Exchange: Westernization and Japonisme.

Painting and Sculpture Re-defined.

Mingei: Japan's Folkcraft Movement.

Prewar Militarism and Postwar Avant-Garde.

Architecture.

Decorative and Applied Arts.

Sculpture.

Painting.

Bunjinga, Zenga, and Haiga.

Nihonga: Japanese-style Painting.

Yoga: Western-style Painting.

Postwar Abstractions.

Woodblock Prints.

Photography.

Performance, Multimedia, and Conceptual Art.

Timeline.

Glossary.

Bibliography.

Photo and text credits.

Index.

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