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Overview

"This book surveys applied arts and industrial design from the eighteenth century to the present day, exploring the dynamic relationship between design and manufacturing, and the technological, social, and commercial context in which this relationship developed." Wide-ranging examples of products and graphic design are shown - and their significance within the history of design explained - including vessels and other objects made from glass, ceramics, plastic, or metal, as well as tableware, furniture, textiles, lighting, housings for electric appliances, machines and equipment, cars, tools, books, posters, magazines, illustrations, advertisements, and digital information. The book also explores the impact of a wealth of new manmade industrial materials on the course of modern design - from steel to titanium, plywood to plastic, cotton to nylon, wire to transistors, and from microprocessors to nanotubes.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“David Raizman's History of Modern Design has assumed landmark status within design studies. Synthesizing design, technology, art history and social history, Raizman builds a cogent argument for studying design as both a production-based discipline and an intellectually-driven profession.”

- Elizabeth Guffey, Professor of Art History, School of Humanities, Purchase College, State University of New York, and Editor, Design and Culture

"With a reworking of the book’s narrative structure and inclusion of ways in which the concept and power of design have mutated in the seven years since its first publication, this book remains an essential addition to the bookshelves of designers, design students and those for whom design-thinking is important."

- Jamie Brassett, MA Course Director and Subject Leader, Central St Martin's

“Functioning as a superb overview of the ways in which design issues affected the modern world (from the 18th century until now) Raizman has successfully created…the foremost text for those well versed in design history while also presenting the general public with a comprehensive, informed, extremely well illustrated volume that will stand the test of time.”

- Gabriel P. Weisberg, Professor of Art History, Design and Graphic Art History, University of Minnesota

“This book offers a fascinating and authoritative cross-disciplinary description of the past 250 years of design history. The text moves effortlessly between typography, graphic design, fashion, furniture design, architecture, and many other disciplines. It is exemplary because of its balanced prioritisation of historical events and factors and its rich contextualisation. It is an excellent textbook for teachers and students in universities, academies and design schools and a fine introduction for readers with an interest in design, with whom it has already, deservedly, found an audience.”

- Ida Engholm, Associate Professor, Danish Centre for Design Research, The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen

“Incorporating architecture, graphic design, product design, typography, studio craft, furniture design and fashion design, seamlessly contextualized through both the "fine arts" canon and popular culture of their respective era, Raizman’s History of Modern Design is an invaluable resource for not only understanding design history, but its relevance to cultural history. The host of new illustrations and up-to-the-minute writing on contemporary issues in design only improve upon Raizman's winning approach.”

- Maria Elena Buszek, Assistant Professor of Art History, School of Liberal Arts, Kansas City Art Institute

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131830400
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/30/2003
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 9.66 (w) x 10.56 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

David Raizman is a professor in the Department of Visual Studies at Drexel University in Philadelphia. He has published several studies in journals and books focusing on the art and architecture of Spain in the later twelfth and early thirteenth centuries for the journal Gesta. Professor Raizman is also the author of Objects, Audiences, and Literatures: Alternative Narratives in the History of Design, co-edited with Carma Gorman published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing (UK).

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Read an Excerpt

The material and methodology for this book were developed over eight years of teaching a course entitled History of Modern Design in the College of Media Arts & Design at Drexel University, and almost twenty years of general undergraduate art history teaching experience. During these past eight years it has been rewarding to hear students reflect upon everyday objects in relation to the values and attitudes of their time, to consider the complex interplay of technological, commercial, social, and esthetic considerations that deepen our understanding of their beauty and the range of their meanings.

One of the persistent difficulties in offering this course over the years has been the issue of a textbook. History of fine art courses are far more common than those in the history of design, and there is no shortage of art-history texts to provide images and narrative to accompany general and more specialized courses relating to a variety of periods and movements. Yet despite the many colleges and universities that educate professional industrial, interior, graphic, merchandising, textile, and fashion designers, I found in my teaching that no introductory text served the needs of a course that integrated material from a broad range of specialized design fields over the past three centuries. Rather than being limited to a single area like graphic design or industrial design, the present survey covers the history of these fields in relation to one another and the common themes they share, whether technology, production, consumption, or reform.

At first I relied upon a list of reserve readings, and in time supplemented these with my own outlines for lecture notes available through the university's computing services center. Subsequently I received a grant from the university to create a website that allowed an appropriate format to be developed for the presentation of a combination of text links and images for study and student preparation. Putting these notes into book form has been for me a formidable task. The required reading, travel, and study took me far from my own original training in the art of medieval Spain, requiring substantial historical perspective to provide a context for studying the objects and a desire to follow through with combining perspectives from both consumption and production for each chapter. In the course of writing and re-writing, I tried to organize the material both chronologically and thematically. Briefly stated, the themes are:

  • SPECIALIZATION AND THE TECHNOLOGY OF MATERIALS AND PRODUCTION
  • REFORM AND THE ROLE OF STANDARDS FOR DESIGN
  • THE EQUALITY OF THE ARTS
  • DESIGN FOR MECHANIZED PRODUCTION
  • "GOOD" DESIGN AND POPULAR CULTURE
  • PLURALISM AND DESIGN

In preparing this History of Modern Design I have benefited from a number of previous studies, beginning with most students' (of my generation anyway) introduction to modern design history, Sir Nikolaus Pevsner's Pioneers of Modern Design, and including more recent titles such as Penny Sparke's An Introduction to Design and Culture in the Twentieth Century (1986), Adrian Forty's Objects of Desire (1986), and Richard Woodham's Twentieth-Century Design (1997). There is also the excellent series of books by a range of specialists published by Oxford University Press. These include a number of volumes devoted to period styles (Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Bauhaus, for example), as well as John Heskett's excellent Industrial Design (i98o). Also, Phillip Meggs's History of Graphic Design is a most informative survey of that material with a strong emphasis in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

As I began teaching the history, of modern design, I found myself drawn to the period room and decorative arts galleries of museums rather than to their Painting and sculpture galleries. As a result I've been pleased to observe, in my adopted city of Philadelphia,, that the Philadelphia Museum of Art has redesigned its galleries to merge fine with decorative art in a way which can only aid in the appreciation of our subject. It is also encouraging to note the recent increase in art-historical journals that have devoted issues to the applied arts, and those monographs that have done much to promote interest in the history of design. It is necessary to ma few of the latter, as they greatly aided in formulating many of the sections for the individual chapters that follow: Nancy Troy's Modernism and the Decorative Arts in France. Art Nouveau to Le Corbusier, the Guggenheim Museum's massive catalogue for The Great Utopia. The Russian and Soviet Avant-garde, 1915-1932 exhibition, the American Craft Museum's catalogues for their series of exhibitions on domestic design entitled The Ideal Home beginning with the period from 1890-1910, and Debora Silverman's Art Nouveau in Fin-de-Siecle France: Politics, Psychology, and Style. Many of these books incorporate ideas drawn from a significant literature on the study of consumption, stemming less from art history than from social anthropology and the field of popular and mass culture.

Aside from those mentioned above, a number of exhibitions and their accompanying catalogues introduced me to a wide range of material that has been incorporated into this text. These include German Graphic Design (2001), Godwin (2000), and Swedish Glass (1997) at the Bard Graduate School in New York; Henry Dreyfuss at the Cooper Hewitt (1998), the traveling collection of chairs and other furniture from the Vitra Museum in Switzerland (1999-2ooo) at the Allentown Museum and the Cooper Hewitt; Mackintosh (1994) and American Modernism (2000) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1994); the Aluminum by Design exhibition at the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh and the Cooper Hewitt (2000-2001); the Art in Rome in the Eighteenth Century exhibition in Philadelphia (2000); Will Price at the small Arthur Ross Gallery in the Fine Arts Library at the University of Pennsylvania; and the extensive Art Nouveau exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (2000).

Recent monographs stemming from renewed interest in A. W N. Pugin, Christopher Dresser, Russel Wright, C. R. Mackintosh and others are filling gaps in our knowledge and bringing new material to light, including the publication of primary source material and a wide range of visual material: they are among the numerous healthy signs of growing public and scholarly interest in an area with wide-ranging appeal to students, artists and designers, art historians, and collectors. Great Britain remains most active in the field of design history, through a variety of conferences, the Journal of Design History, the Design Research Society and its on-line publication Design Research News (DRN), and the number of courses offered at colleges and universities. Finally, the journal Design Issues not only contributes articles on the methods of designers but also frequently offers historical perspectives and reviews. It is my hope that the approach to this introductory text will be viewed as balanced and tolerant, and that the analyses will promote appreciation and suggest the synthesis of description and a framework based upon the interconnections of social, commercial, esthetic, and technological perspectives on design. In addition, as a teacher I have always enjoyed the challenge of comparing works of art from different or even successive time periods that share formal or ideological similarities. I am happy for the students in the College of Media Arts & Design who have made the study of design history part of their education and hope that what they have learned will in some way be incorporated into the contributions they are certain to make to their chosen design professions.

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Table of Contents

Preface 8
Acknowledgments 9
Introduction 11
Pt. I Supply, Demand, and Design (1700-1865) 15
1 Demand and Production 17
2 Entrepreneurial Efforts in Britain and Elsewhere 27
3 Growing Pains: Expanding Industry in the Early Nineteenth Century 34
4 Design, Society, and Standards 45
Pt. II Arts, Crafts, and Machines (1866-1914) 65
5 The Equality of the Arts 67
6 The Joy of Work 106
7 Mechanization and Industry 129
Pt. III After the World War I (1918-1944): Moderne, Industry, and Utopias 139
8 Paris and Art Moderne Before and After World War I 143
9 The "First Machine Age" in Europe 166
10 Art, Design, and Industry in the United States 205
Pt. IV Humanism and Luxury: International Modernism and Mass Culture After World War II, 1945-1960 239
11 International Modernism: From Theory to Practice 244
12 Design and Mass Appeal: A Culture of Consumption 294
Pt. V Progress, Protest, and Pluralism 1960-2000 315
13 New Materials, New Products 317
14 Dimensions of Mass Culture 336
15 Politics, Pluralism, and Postmodernism 353
16 Design in Context: An Act of Balance 363
Timeline 385
Bibliography 387
Index 396
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Preface

The material and methodology for this book were developed over eight years of teaching a course entitled History of Modern Design in the College of Media Arts & Design at Drexel University, and almost twenty years of general undergraduate art history teaching experience. During these past eight years it has been rewarding to hear students reflect upon everyday objects in relation to the values and attitudes of their time, to consider the complex interplay of technological, commercial, social, and esthetic considerations that deepen our understanding of their beauty and the range of their meanings.

One of the persistent difficulties in offering this course over the years has been the issue of a textbook. History of fine art courses are far more common than those in the history of design, and there is no shortage of art-history texts to provide images and narrative to accompany general and more specialized courses relating to a variety of periods and movements. Yet despite the many colleges and universities that educate professional industrial, interior, graphic, merchandising, textile, and fashion designers, I found in my teaching that no introductory text served the needs of a course that integrated material from a broad range of specialized design fields over the past three centuries. Rather than being limited to a single area like graphic design or industrial design, the present survey covers the history of these fields in relation to one another and the common themes they share, whether technology, production, consumption, or reform.

At first I relied upon a list of reserve readings, and in time supplemented these with my own outlines for lecture notes available through the university's computing services center. Subsequently I received a grant from the university to create a website that allowed an appropriate format to be developed for the presentation of a combination of text links and images for study and student preparation. Putting these notes into book form has been for me a formidable task. The required reading, travel, and study took me far from my own original training in the art of medieval Spain, requiring substantial historical perspective to provide a context for studying the objects and a desire to follow through with combining perspectives from both consumption and production for each chapter. In the course of writing and re-writing, I tried to organize the material both chronologically and thematically. Briefly stated, the themes are:

  • SPECIALIZATION AND THE TECHNOLOGY OF MATERIALS AND PRODUCTION
  • REFORM AND THE ROLE OF STANDARDS FOR DESIGN
  • THE EQUALITY OF THE ARTS
  • DESIGN FOR MECHANIZED PRODUCTION
  • "GOOD" DESIGN AND POPULAR CULTURE
  • PLURALISM AND DESIGN

In preparing this History of Modern Design I have benefited from a number of previous studies, beginning with most students' (of my generation anyway) introduction to modern design history, Sir Nikolaus Pevsner's Pioneers of Modern Design, and including more recent titles such as Penny Sparke's An Introduction to Design and Culture in the Twentieth Century (1986), Adrian Forty's Objects of Desire (1986), and Richard Woodham's Twentieth-Century Design (1997). There is also the excellent series of books by a range of specialists published by Oxford University Press. These include a number of volumes devoted to period styles (Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Bauhaus, for example), as well as John Heskett's excellent Industrial Design (i98o). Also, Phillip Meggs's History of Graphic Design is a most informative survey of that material with a strong emphasis in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

As I began teaching the history, of modern design, I found myself drawn to the period room and decorative arts galleries of museums rather than to their Painting and sculpture galleries. As a result I've been pleased to observe, in my adopted city of Philadelphia,, that the Philadelphia Museum of Art has redesigned its galleries to merge fine with decorative art in a way which can only aid in the appreciation of our subject. It is also encouraging to note the recent increase in art-historical journals that have devoted issues to the applied arts, and those monographs that have done much to promote interest in the history of design. It is necessary to ma few of the latter, as they greatly aided in formulating many of the sections for the individual chapters that follow: Nancy Troy's Modernism and the Decorative Arts in France. Art Nouveau to Le Corbusier, the Guggenheim Museum's massive catalogue for The Great Utopia. The Russian and Soviet Avant-garde, 1915-1932 exhibition, the American Craft Museum's catalogues for their series of exhibitions on domestic design entitled The Ideal Home beginning with the period from 1890-1910, and Debora Silverman's Art Nouveau in Fin-de-Siecle France: Politics, Psychology, and Style. Many of these books incorporate ideas drawn from a significant literature on the study of consumption, stemming less from art history than from social anthropology and the field of popular and mass culture.

Aside from those mentioned above, a number of exhibitions and their accompanying catalogues introduced me to a wide range of material that has been incorporated into this text. These include German Graphic Design (2001), Godwin (2000), and Swedish Glass (1997) at the Bard Graduate School in New York; Henry Dreyfuss at the Cooper Hewitt (1998), the traveling collection of chairs and other furniture from the Vitra Museum in Switzerland (1999-2ooo) at the Allentown Museum and the Cooper Hewitt; Mackintosh (1994) and American Modernism (2000) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1994); the Aluminum by Design exhibition at the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh and the Cooper Hewitt (2000-2001); the Art in Rome in the Eighteenth Century exhibition in Philadelphia (2000); Will Price at the small Arthur Ross Gallery in the Fine Arts Library at the University of Pennsylvania; and the extensive Art Nouveau exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (2000).

Recent monographs stemming from renewed interest in A. W N. Pugin, Christopher Dresser, Russel Wright, C. R. Mackintosh and others are filling gaps in our knowledge and bringing new material to light, including the publication of primary source material and a wide range of visual material: they are among the numerous healthy signs of growing public and scholarly interest in an area with wide-ranging appeal to students, artists and designers, art historians, and collectors. Great Britain remains most active in the field of design history, through a variety of conferences, the Journal of Design History, the Design Research Society and its on-line publication Design Research News (DRN), and the number of courses offered at colleges and universities. Finally, the journal Design Issues not only contributes articles on the methods of designers but also frequently offers historical perspectives and reviews. It is my hope that the approach to this introductory text will be viewed as balanced and tolerant, and that the analyses will promote appreciation and suggest the synthesis of description and a framework based upon the interconnections of social, commercial, esthetic, and technological perspectives on design. In addition, as a teacher I have always enjoyed the challenge of comparing works of art from different or even successive time periods that share formal or ideological similarities. I am happy for the students in the College of Media Arts & Design who have made the study of design history part of their education and hope that what they have learned will in some way be incorporated into the contributions they are certain to make to their chosen design professions.

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