History of Pi

History of Pi

4.0 9
by Petr Beckmann
     
 

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The history of pi, says the author, though a small part of the history of mathematics, is nevertheless a mirror of the history of man. Petr Beckmann holds up this mirror, giving the background of the times when pi made progress -- and also when it did not, because science was being stifled by militarism or religious fanaticism.

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Overview

The history of pi, says the author, though a small part of the history of mathematics, is nevertheless a mirror of the history of man. Petr Beckmann holds up this mirror, giving the background of the times when pi made progress -- and also when it did not, because science was being stifled by militarism or religious fanaticism.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A pure delight . . . Entirely offbeat, which gives it its charm.” —The Denver Post

“A very readable account.” —Science

“A cheerful work.” —Scientific American

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312381851
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
07/15/1976
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
559,048
Product dimensions:
5.53(w) x 8.13(h) x 0.54(d)

Meet the Author

Petr Beckmann was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1924. Until 1963, he worked as a research scientist for the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, when he was invited as a Visiting Professor to the University of Colorado, where he decided to stay permanently as professor of electrical engineering. He has authored eleven books and more than fifty scientific papers, mostly on probability theory and electromagnetic wave propagation.

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History of Pi 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ET1SS More than 1 year ago
The subject could be of little interest to some , but the off subject comments and expressed opinions make the book a fun read for anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
And yes, some bias (he is not a fan of Aristotle, the Roman Empire or the Catholic Church). I suppose you could pick this book apart if you wished. I found a lot of information inside that I had never heard of before, and appreciated a different take. When you ask the average person about contributions the Roman Empire made to science and the arts, they talk about aqueducts and whatnot. As an example, he states that the Romans only measured a cross section of water to determine delivery of water, where previous cultures included velocity of the water flow as well. He also goes on and on about how Aristotle was an egotistical man who didn't know as much as supposed, favored and pushed by the Catholic Church for a thousand years.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author warns us he is not a mathematician, but does not warn us that he is not a writer either. We do learn of all the author's biases, but not a great deal more. On top of that, the book lacks organization.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Beckmann covers a lot of information in this seemingly small book. The book is well thought out and written in a way that is easy to understand. I must say I was more entertained than I anticipated being from a book on mathematics.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The title is interesting