A History of Postcolonial Lusophone Africa

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" . . . useful, timely, and important . . . a good and informative book on the Lusophone countries, Portuguese colonialism, and postcolonial influences." —Phyllis Martin, Indiana ... University "This book, produced by the obvious—and distinguished—corps of country specialists . . . fills a real gap in both state-level and 'regional' (broadly defined) studies of contemporary Africa." —Norrie MacQueen, University of Dundee Although the five Portuguese-speaking countries in Africa that gained independence in 1974/75—Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau, Cape Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe—differ from each other in many ways, they share a history of Portuguese rule going back to the 15th century, which has left a mark to this day. Patrick Chabal and his co-authors assess the nature of the Portuguese legacy, using a twofold approach. In Part I, three analytical, thematic chapters by Chabal examine what the five countries have in common and how they differ from the rest of Africa. In Part II, individual chapters by leading specialists, each devoted to a specific country, survey the histories of those countries since independence. The book places the postcolonial experience of the Lusophone countries within the context of their precolonial and colonial past and compares and contrasts their experience with that of non-Lusophone African states. The result is a comprehensive, readable, and up-to-date text and reference work on the evolution of postcolonial Portuguese-speaking Africa. Read more Show Less

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Overview

Historical and comparative in its approach, this book places the postcolonial experience of the Lusophone countries within the context of their precolonial and colonial past, comparing and contrasting their experience with that of non-Lusophone African states. The result is a comprehensive, readable, and up-to-date text and reference work on the evolution of postcolonial Portuguese-speaking Africa within the context of the historical experience of African states since independence.

Author Biography: Patrick Chabal is Professor of Lusophone African Studies, University of London, and Head of the Department of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies at King's College, London. He is co-author (with Jean-Pascal Daloz) of Africa Works: Disorder as Political Instrument (Indiana University Press) and author of Amílcar Cabral: Revolutionary Leadership and People's Wars.
David Birmingham is Professor of History, University of Kent at Canterbury. His books include Portugal and Africa and Frontline Nationalism in Angola and Mozambique.
Joshua Forrest is Professor of Politics at the University of Vermont and author of Guinea-Bissau: Power, Conflict and Renewal in a West African Nation.
Malyn Newitt is Charles Boxer Professor of Portuguese History, University of London. His books include Portugal in Africa and A History of Mozambique (Indiana University Press).
Gerhard Seibert, a researcher on contemporary Lusophone Africa, is the author of Comrades, Clients, and Cousins: Colonialism, Socialism, and Democratization in S&atildeo Tomé e Príncipe.
Elsa Silva Andrade, an economist who is currently a researcher and consultant in her homestate of Cape Verde, is the author of Les Îles du Cap Vert: De la Découverte à l'indépendance.

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Editorial Reviews

Foreign Affairs
The first half of this useful book is Chabal's comparative survey of Africa's five Lusophone countries, and the second half consists of chapters by country experts who focus on Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Cape Verde, and S‹o Tome and Principe, respectively. Chabal identifies the commonalities and differences among the five countries, pinpoints the characteristics that result specifically from their Portuguese heritage, and assesses how each today shares common features with African countries formerly ruled by other colonial powers. The focus is on the years 1975-2000, but all the authors take precolonial and colonial historical conditions into account. Bringing a sophisticated analytical perspective to his introduction, Chabal measures each postcolonial government against the now-fashionable neopatrimonial paradigm (boss-run regimes built on patronage), makes allowances for the varying political skills of nationalist leaders, considers the effects of anticolonial wars in three of the five countries, and looks at the failure of socialist experiments in each. This work fills an important gap.
K. W. Grundy

"This history of five African Portuguese—speaking countries since they gained independence from Portugal in 1974—75 is a challenge for two major reasons. First, the countries defy easy comparison, being different in size, geography, and socioeconomic profile. Second, they frequently have more in common with their regional neighbors than with one another. This volume slices into the project from two angles. In part 1, Chabal (Univ. of London) writes three thematic chapters that analyze what these countries have in common and how they differ from and are similar to the rest of Africa. They cover the end of empire (wars and decolonization), the construction of the nation—state (nationalism, power relationships, socialism and international affairs), and the limits of nationhood (partisan and political rivalries). These three chapters are concise, well organized, balanced, perceptive, critical, and insightful. Part 2 provides five country chapters, each by a different scholar of the area. The chapters on Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea—Bissau are well written, especially on the wars, politics, and the economy. Less successful are the two chapters on Cape Verde and São (Sao) Tomé (Tome) e Príncipe (Principe), which tend to lack critical analysis and be too dependent on official reports and data sources. A useful bibliography is organized by country. Upper—division undergraduates and above." —K. W. Grundy, Case Western Reserve University, 2003feb CHOICE

From the Publisher

"Bringing a sophisticated analytical perspective to his introduction, Chabal measures each postcolonial government against the now—fashionable neopatrimonial paradigm (boss—run regimes built on patronage), makes allowances for the varying political skills of nationalist leaders, considers the effects of anticolonial wars in three of the five countries, and looks at the failure of socialist experiments in each. This work fills an important gap." —Foreign Affairs

Indiana University Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253341877
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2002
  • Pages: 346
  • Product dimensions: 5.66 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Patrick Chabal is Professor of Lusophone African Studies, University of London, and Head of the Department of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies at King’s College, London. He is co-author (with Jean-Pascal Daloz) of Africa Works: Disorder as Political Instrument (Indiana University Press).

Indiana University Press

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Notes on the Co-Authors
Glossary
Abbreviations
Preface
Map of Lusophone Africa
Pt. I Lusophone Africa in Historical and Comparative Perspective
1 The end of empire 3
2 The construction of the nation-state 29
3 The limits of nationhood 88
Pt. II Country Studies
4 Angola 137
5 Mozambique 185
6 Guinea-Bissau 236
7 Cape Verde 264
8 Sao Tome e Principe 291
Bibliography 316
Index 333
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