The History Of Rome (Volume 2)

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28 CHAPTER II. THE WAR BETWEEN ROME AND CARTHAGE CONCERNING SICILY. state of Fob upwards of a century the feud between the Cartha- Sicily. ginians and the rulers of Syracuse had devastated the beautiful island of Sicily. On both ...
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The History of Rome

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
28 CHAPTER II. THE WAR BETWEEN ROME AND CARTHAGE CONCERNING SICILY. state of Fob upwards of a century the feud between the Cartha- Sicily. ginians and the rulers of Syracuse had devastated the beautiful island of Sicily. On both sides the contest was carried on with the weapons of political proselytism, for, while Carthage kept up communications with the aristocratico- republican opposition in Syracuse, the Syracusan dynasts maintained relations with the national party in the "Greek cities that had become tributary to Carthage. On both sides armies of mercenaries were employed to fight their battles —by Timoleon and Agathocles, as well as by the Phoenician generals. And as like means were employed on both sides, so the conflict had been waged on both with a disregard of honour and a perfidy unexampled in the history of the west. The Syracusans were the weaker party. In the peace of 314. 440, Carthage had still limited her claims to the third of the island to the west of Heraclea Minoa and Himera, and had expressly recognized the hegemony of the Syracusans over all the cities to the eastward. The expulsion 275. of Pyrrhus from Sicily and Italy (479) left by far the larger half of the island, and especially the important city of Agrigentum, in the hands of Carthage ; the Syracusans re- tamed nothing but Tauromenium and the south-east of the Campanian island. In the second great city on the east coast, Messana, mercenaries, a band of foreign soldiers had established themselves and held the city, independent alike of Syracusans and Carthaginians. These new rulers of Messana were Campanian mercenaries. The dissolute habits that had become prevalent among the Sabellians settled in and around Capua (i. 364), had made Campania in the fourth and fifth centuries—what Etolia, Crete...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217298728
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 10/14/2010
  • Pages: 190
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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CHAPTER IX ART AND SCIENCE The growth of art, and of poetic art especially, in antiquity was intimately, associated with, the deveIopmcatQf jiauoaal festiyals. The thanksgiving-festival of the Roman com munity, which had been already organized in the previous period essentially under Greek influence and in the first instance as an extraordinary festival,—the ludi maximi or Romani (L 293),—acquired during the present epoch a longer duration and greater variety in the amusements. Originally limited to one day, the festival was prolonged by an additional day after the happy termination of each of 609. 494. the three great revolutions of 245, 260, and 387, and thus at the close of this period it had already a duration of four days.1 1 The account given by Dionysius (vL 95; comp. Niebuhr, ii. 40) nd by Plutarch (Camill. 42), deriving his statement from another passage in Dionysius regarding the Latin festival, must be understood to applv rather to the Roman games, as, apart from other grounds, is strikingly evident from comparing the latter passage with Liv. vi. 43 (Ritschl, Parerg. i. p. 313). Dionysius has—and, according to his wont when in error, persistently—misunderstood the expression ludi maximi. There was, moreover, a tradition which referred the origin of the national festival not, as in the common version, to the conquest of the Latins by the first Tarquinius, but to the victory over the Latins at the lake Regillus (Cicero, dt Div. i. 26, 55; Dionys. vii. 7i). That the important statements preserved in the latter passage from Fabius really relate to the ordinary thanksgiving-festival, and not to any special votive solemnity, is evident from the expressallusion to the annual recurrence of the celebration, and from the exact agreement of the sum of the expense...
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