The History of the Knights Templars

( 46 )

Overview

The history of the Knights Templars is a remarkable story of triumphs and defeats, marked with controversies and tragedy.  From their rise to their demise, Charles G. Addison captivatingly chronicles the various characters that played a role in shaping this powerful military order that reigned for almost two centuries during the Middle Ages.

Having examined scores of documents and texts, and traveled to many of the ruined fortresses and castles of the order, Addison was an ...

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The History of the Knights Templars

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Overview

The history of the Knights Templars is a remarkable story of triumphs and defeats, marked with controversies and tragedy.  From their rise to their demise, Charles G. Addison captivatingly chronicles the various characters that played a role in shaping this powerful military order that reigned for almost two centuries during the Middle Ages.

Having examined scores of documents and texts, and traveled to many of the ruined fortresses and castles of the order, Addison was an expert on the Templars’ history. He insightfully details their plight in this volume, first published in 1842. Starting with the origins of the brotherhood, the foundations and ideals of the order, and their chosen symbol of the red cross, the author explains their role in protecting pilgrims traveling to the Holy Land, their feats during the Crusades, the relationships they held with various kings and church leaders, their contributions to protecting Europe from Turkish conquest and preserving Christianity in Europe and Asia, and their tragic end: stripped of their lands, tortured, and burned at the stake.  

Addison provides a clear and comprehensible account of this great religious and military fraternity of knights and monks that will engross anyone interested in their history and the Middle Ages.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616088460
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/1/2012
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 427,933
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles G. Addison was an English barrister and historical,
travel, and legal writer during the nineteenth century. He is the author of Damascus and Palmyra, The Temple Church, and two legal textbooks, A Treatise on the Law of Contracts and Wrongs and their Remedies, and A Treatise on the Law of Torts. He lived in England.

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Table of Contents

Chapter I 1

Origin of the Templars

The piligrimages to Jerusalem

The dangers to which pilgrims were exposed

The formation of the brotherhood of the poor fellow-soliders of Jesus Christ to protect them

Their location in the Temple

A descriptions of the Temple

Origin of the name Templars

Hugh de Payens chosen Master of the Temple

Is sent to Europe by King Baldwin

Is introduced to the Pope

The assembling of the Council of Troyes

The formation of a rule for the government of the Templars

Chapter II Regula Pauperum Commilitonum Christi et Cempli Salomonis 10

The most curious parts of the rule displayed

The confirmation of the rule by the Pope

The visit of Hugh de Payens, the Master of the Temple to England

His cordial reception

The foundation of the Order in this country

Lands and money granted to the Templars

Their popularity in Europe

The rapid increase of their fraternity

St. Bernard takes up the pen in their behalf

He displays their valour and piety

Chapter III 25

Hugh de Payens returns to Palestine

His death

Robert de Craon made Master

Success of the Infidels

The second Crusade

The Templars assume the Red Cross

Their gallant actions and high discipline

Lands, manors, and churches granted them in England

Bernard de Tremelay made Master

He is slain by the Infidels

Bertrand de Blanquefort made Master

He is taken prisoner, and sent in chains to Aleppo

The Pope writes letters in praise of the Templars

Their religious and military enthusiasm

Their war banner called Beauseant

The rise of the rival religio-military order of the Hospital of St. John

Chapter IV 41

The contests between Saladin and the Templars

The vast privileges of the Templars

The publication of the bull, omme datum optimum

The Pope declares himself the immediate Bishop of the entire Order

The different classes of Templars

The knights

Priests

Serving brethren

The hired soldiers

The great officers of the Temple

Punishment of cowardice

The Master of the Temple is taken prisoner, and dies in a dungeon

Saladin's great successes

The Christians purchase a truce

The Master of the Temple and the Patriarch Heraclius proceed to England for succour

The consecration of the Temple Church at London

Chapter V 55

The Temple at London

The vast possessions of the Templars in England

The territorial divisions of the Order

The different preceptories in this country

The privileges conferred on the Templars by the kings of England

The Masters of the Temple at London

Their power and importance

Chapter VI 79

The Patriarch Heraclius quarrels with the king of England

He returns to Palestine without succour

The disappointments and gloomy forebodings of the Templars

They prepare to resist Saladin

Their defeat and slaughter

The valiant deeds of the Marshal of the Temple

The fatal battle of Tiberias

The captivity of the Grand Master and the true Cross

The captive Templars are offered the Koran or death

They choose the latter, and are beheaded

The fall of Jerusalem

The Moslems take possession of the Temple

They purify it with rose-water, say prayers, and hear a sermon

The Templars retire to Antioch

Their letters to the king of England and the Master of the Temple at London

Their exploits at the siege of Acre

Chapter VII 97

Richard Cœur de Lion joins the Templars before Acre

The city surrenders, and the Templars establish the chief house of their order within it

Cœur de lion takes up his abode with them

He sells to them the island of Cyprus

The Templars form the van of his army

Their foraging expeditions and great exploits

Cœur de Lion quits the Holy Land in the disguise of a Knight Templar

The Templars build the Pilgrim's Castle in Palestine

The state of the Order in England

King John resides in the Temple at London

The barons come to him at that place, and demand Magna Chart a

The exploits of the Templars in Egypt

The letters of the Grand Master to the Master of the Temple at London

The Templars reconquer Jerusalem

Chapter VIII 113

The conquest of Jerusalem by the Carizmians

The slaughter of the Templars, and the death of the Grand Master

The exploits of the Templars in Egypt

King Louis of France visits the Templars in Palestine

He assists them in putting the country into a defensible state-*Henry II., king of England, visits the Temple at Paris

The magnificent hospitality of the Templars in England and France

Benocdar, sultan of Egypt, invades Palestine

He defeats the Templars, takes their strong fortresses, and decapitates six hundred of their brethren

The Grand Master comes to England for succour

The renewal of the war

The fall of Acre, and the final extinction of the Templars in Palestine

Chapter IX 132

The downfall of the Templars

The cause thereof

The Grand Master comes to Europe at the request of the Pope

He is imprisoned, with all the Templars in France, by command of king Phillip

They are put to the torture, and confessions of the guilt of heresy and idolatry are extracted from them

Edward II. king of England stands up in defence of the Templars, but afterwards persecutes them at the instance of the Pope

The imprisonment of the Master of the Temple and all his brethren in England

Their examination upon eighty-seven horrible and ridiculous articles of accusation before foreign inquistors appointed by the Pope

A council of the church assembles at London to pass sentence upon them

The curious evidence adduced as to the model of admission into the Order, and of the customs and observances of the fraternity

Chapter X 162

The Templars in France revoke their rack-extorted confessions

They are tried as relapsed heretics, and burnt at the stake

The progress of the inquiry in England

The curious evidence adduced as to the mode of holding the chapters of the Order

As to the penance enjoined therein, and the absolution pronounced by the Master

The Templars draw up a written defence, which they present to the ecclesiastical council

They are placed in separate dungeons, and put to the torture

Two serving brethren and a chaplain of the Order then make confessions

Many other Templars acknowledge themselves guilty of heresy in respect of their belief in the religious authority of their Master

They make their recantations, and are reconciled to the church before the south door of Saint Paul's cathedral

The order of the Temple is abolished by the Pope

The last of the Masters of the Temple in England dies in the Tower

The disposal of the property of the Order

Observations on the downfall of the Templars

Chapter XI The Temple Church 195

The restoration of the Temple Church

The beauty and magnificence of the venerable building

The various styles of architecture displayed in it

The discoveries made during the recent restoration

The sacrarium

The marble piscina

The sacramental niches

The penitential cell

The ancient Chapel of St. Anne

Historical matters connected with the Temple Church

The holy relics anciently preserved therein

The interesting monumental remains

Chapter XII The Temple Church 208

The Monuments Op the Crusaders

The tomb and effigy of Sir Geoffrey de Magnaville, earl of Essex, and constable of the Tower

His life and death, and famous exploits

Of William Marshall, earl of Pembroke, Protector of England

Of the Lord de Ross

Of William and Gilbert Marshall, earls of Pembroke

Of William Plantagenet, fifth son of Henry the Third

The anxious desire manifested by king Henry the Third, queen Eleanor, and various persons of rank, to be buried in the Temple Church

Chapter XIII The Temple 231

Antiquities in the Temple

The history of the place subsequent to the dissolution of the Order of the Knights Templars

The establishment of a society of lawyers in the Temple

The antiquity of this society

Its connexion with the ancient society of the Knights Templars

An order of knights and serving brethren established in the law

The degree of free serjen, or frater serviens, borrowed from the ancient Templars

The modern Templars divide themselves into the two societies of the Inner and Middle Temple

Chapter XIV The Temple 252

The Temple Garden

The erection of new buildings in the Temple

The dissolution of the Order of the Hospital of Saint John

The law societies become lesses of the crown

The erection of the magnificent Middle Temple Hall

The conversion of the old hall into chambers

The grant of the inheritance of the Temple to the two law societies

Their magnificent present to his Majesty

Their ancient orders and customs, and ancient hospitality

Their grand entertainments

Reader's feasts-Grand Christmasses and Revels

The fox-hunt in the hall

The dispute with the Lord Mayor

The quarrel with the custos of the Temple Church

Errata

for infinitus read infinits 6

for carrissime, read carissime 29

for Angli, read Anglia 42

for promptia, read promptior 79

for principos, read principes 79

for Patriarcha, read patriarcham 80

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 46 )
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(6)

4 Star

(14)

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(12)

2 Star

(7)

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(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 46 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 24, 2011

    Great History of the Knights Templars

    The detail is minute. I have read several short accounts of the group, but nothing as close to "first hand" as this. The work gives a multitude of references to support the author's deductions about the Knights. He pretty much substantiates the Knights got screwed by the later Pope and the Kings in order to get their money and possessions that were given to them by the Popes and the Kings that previously supported them.

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 28, 2011

    Text Book

    This was dry reading. It reads like a text book. With that said I enjoyed the readind and recommend it as formal and enlightning. I believe that the writter would have been better to give input as to the battles that took place. The author had mind made up that the templers were bad to begin with, and by discribing the lossing battles and in most cases left out the winning battles. You must approach the book as politically correct, but not wholly accurate.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2011

    Not high on my reading list

    This may be a historically accurate account of the Knights Templar (I have no way of knowing), but it reads like a text book on quantum physics. But then, I've never read a text book on that subject.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 29, 2011

    A tough read

    This book was not what I expected. It is very very involved and is writen in an old style. NOT RECOMMENTED!

    3 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    The Knights Templars started out as holy men loyal to Rome, but

    The Knights Templars started out as holy men loyal to Rome, but as often happens, they grew greedy and corrupt in Palestine.
    The Templars amassed great wealth through one of the first systems of profit banking, though usury was and is forbidden by the
    Catholic Church. Finally, after being infiltrated by other profiteers in the Holy Land, they presumed to use their wealth to command
    the Pope himself, and extort kings and queens in other lands. So they were disbanded and excommunicated, after which they fled and
    because they had such skills building castles and banking houses, joined the masons guilds. They quickly influenced the guilds and soon became a secret society dedicated to the overthrow of Catholicism in revenge for their excommunication. They became known as Freemasons. They continued their banking and used their wealth to buy kings and queens to do their bidding, and evil men to infiltrate the Church posing as priests, to try to destroy her from within. They use these tactics to this very day. The reader is wise to recognize these things.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2012

    Hate it

    I Hate it

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    What is known already

    This is certainly not the most complete research about the subject but since everybody wants to make a book we are not finding anymore the unique book.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2013

    Very interesting

    Very interesting

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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