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History of the Manufacture of Iron in All Ages: And Particularly in the United States from Colonial Time to 1891

Overview

James Moore Swank (1832–1914) was a US expert on iron and steel, and wrote widely about the industry. In 1873 he became secretary of the American Iron and Steel Association. This second edition (1892) of his influential book on iron manufacture was significantly expanded compared to the 1884 original, with 132 more pages, 15 extra chapters, and revisions throughout the text. Swank aimed to move away from the highly technical approach and European focus that had dominated previous works. Instead, he would ...

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Overview

James Moore Swank (1832–1914) was a US expert on iron and steel, and wrote widely about the industry. In 1873 he became secretary of the American Iron and Steel Association. This second edition (1892) of his influential book on iron manufacture was significantly expanded compared to the 1884 original, with 132 more pages, 15 extra chapters, and revisions throughout the text. Swank aimed to move away from the highly technical approach and European focus that had dominated previous works. Instead, he would emphasise names, dates, facts and results, and give special attention to the growth of the industry in the United States while providing an international context. He includes every country and US state that produced iron. The book is organised chronologically, and provides a fascinating account of the manufacture of iron from the ancient Egyptian period through early modern Britain to late nineteenth-century America.

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Table of Contents

Preface; 1. The earliest use of iron; 2. The early use of iron in Europe; 3. Beginning of the British iron industry; 4. The British iron industry from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century; 5. The iron industry of Wales, Ireland, and Scotland; 6. The British iron industry built up by British inventive genius; 7. Early processes in the manufacture of iron and steel; 8. Mediaeval and early modern processes in the manufacture of iron and steel; 9. First attempt by Europeans to manufacture iron in the United States; 10. Beginning of the manufacture of iron in the New England colonies; 11. Extension of the manufacture of iron in New England; 12. Early iron enterprises in New York; 13. Early iron enterprises in New Jersey; 14. Beginning of the manufacture of iron in Pennsylvania; 15. The manufacture of iron in Pennsylvania extended to the Susquehanna; 16. Characteristics of the early iron industry of Pennsylvania; 17. The manufacture of iron in Pennsylvania after the Revolution; 18. The manufacture of charcoal iron in the Juniata Valley; 19. The early manufacture of iron in western Pennsylvania; 20. Early iron enterprises in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; 21. The early manufacture of iron in Delaware; 22. Early iron enterprises in Maryland; 23. The iron industry established in Virginia; 24. The manufacture of iron in North Carolina; 25. The manufacture of iron in South Carolina; 26. The early manufacture of iron in Georgia; 27. The early manufacture of iron in Kentucky; 28. The early manufacture of iron in Tennessee; 29. The manufacture of iron in Alabama; 30. Primitive characteristics of the southern iron industry; 31. The early manufacture of iron in Ohio; 32. Early iron enterprises in Indiana; 33. Early iron enterprises in Illinois; 34. Early iron enterprises in Michigan; 35. The early manufacture of iron in Wisconsin; 36. Early iron enterprises in Missouri; 37. The manufacture of iron in Texas; 38. The manufacture of iron in various western states; 39. The iron industry of the Pacific Coast; 40. The first iron works in Canada; 41. The manufacture of iron with anthracite coal; 42. The manufacture of iron with bituminous coal; 43. Statistics of pig iron production in the United States; 44. The manufacture of blister and crucible steel in the United States; 45. The invention of the Bessemer process; 46. The Bessemer process in the United States; 47. The manufacture of open-hearth steel; 48. The early history of iron rails in the United States; 49. Iron shipbuilding in the United States; 50. The history of cut and wire nails; 51. Improvements in American blast furnace practice; 52. The manufacture of tinplates in the United States; 53. Miscellaneous facts relating to the American iron and steel industries; 54. Early discoveries of coal in the United States; 55. British efforts to prevent the development of the American iron industry; 56. The American iron industry long depressed by foreign competition; 57. Impediments to the cheap production of iron and steel in the United states; 58. Washington and Lincoln the descendants of colonial ironmasters; 59. Production and prices of iron and steel in the United States; 60. Imports and exports of iron and steel by the United States; 61. Miscellaneous statistics of iron, steel, iron ore, and coal; 62. Important uses of iron and steel in the United States; 63. Conclusion; Index.

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