The History of the Supreme Court of the United States

The History of the Supreme Court of the United States

by William M. Wiecek
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521848202

ISBN-13: 9780521848206

Pub. Date: 01/31/2006

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

1941-1953 marked the emergence of legal liberalism, in the divergent activist efforts of Hugo Black, William O. Douglas, Frank Murphy, and Wiley Rutledge. The war and early Cold War years of the Court in reality marked the birth of the constitutional order that dominated American public law in the later twentieth century. That legal outlook emphasized judicial

Overview

1941-1953 marked the emergence of legal liberalism, in the divergent activist efforts of Hugo Black, William O. Douglas, Frank Murphy, and Wiley Rutledge. The war and early Cold War years of the Court in reality marked the birth of the constitutional order that dominated American public law in the later twentieth century. That legal outlook emphasized judicial concern for civil rights, civil liberties, and reaction to the emergent national security state. This book recounts the history of United States Supreme Court in the momentous yet usually overlooked years between the constitutional revolution that occurred in the 1930s and Warren-Court judicial activism in the 1950s.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521848206
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/31/2006
Series:
Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise History of the Supreme Court of the United States Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
752
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 1.73(d)

Table of Contents

Part I. The Roosevelt Court: 1. American Public Law in 1941; 2. A new Court; 3. Carolene Products (1938): prism of the Stone Court; Part II. First Amendment Freedoms: 4. Freedom of speech in the Stone Court; 5. Freedom of speech in the Vinson Court; 6. The free exercise of religion; 7. The establishment of religion; Part III. World War Two and the Constitution: 8. Total war and the constitution; 9. Military courts and treason; 10. Silent Leges: Japanese internment; 11. National authority during and after the war; Part IV. The Truman Court: 12. The Truman Court; 13. American jurisprudence after the war: 'reason called law'; 14. The problem of incorporation; 15. Adamson v. California (1947): prism of the Vinson Court; Part V. The Cold War: 16. Anticommunism and the Cold War: Dennis v. United States; 17. The Cold War cases; Part VI. Civil Rights: 18. Civil Rights and the Stone Court; 19. Civil Rights and the Vinson Court.

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