History of the Thirty-ninth Congress of the United States

History of the Thirty-ninth Congress of the United States

by William Horatio Barnes
     
 

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Subjects: United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1869
Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be numerous typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes.
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Overview


Subjects: United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1869
Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be numerous typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes.
When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940026449057
Publisher:
Harper & brothers
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER H. LOCATIONS OF THE MEMBERS AND CAST OF THE COMMITTEES. Importance Of Surroundings—Members Sometimes Referred To Bv Their Seats—Senator Andrew Johnson—Seating Of The Senators—Drawing In The House—The Senate-chamber As Seen From The Gallery—DisTinguished Senators—The House Of Representatives—Some Prominent Characters—Importance Of Committees—Difficulty In Their AppointMENT—Important Senate Committees—Committees Of The House. THE localities and surroundings of men have an influence on their actions and opinions. A matter which, to the casual observer, seems so unimportant as the selection and arrangement of the seats of Senators and Representatives, has its influence upon the legislation of the country. Ever since parties have had an existence, it has been considered of vital moment that those of one political faith in a deliberative body should occupy, as nearly as possible, the same locality. It is sometimes of service to a reader, in attempting to understand the reported proceedings of Congress, to know the localities of the members. Each seat has a sort of history of its own, and becomes in some way identified with its occupant. Members are frequently alluded to in connection with the seats they occupy. Sometimes it happens that, years after a man has gone from Congress, it is convenient and suggestive to refer to him by his old place in the chamber. As an illustration, Mr. Trumbull, in his speech on the veto of the Civil Rights Bill, desiring to quote Andrew Johnson, Senator, against Andrew Johnson, President, referred to "a speech delivered in this body by a Senator occupying, I think, the seat now occupiedacross the chamber by my friend from Oregon (Mr. Williams)." A necessary and important part of the adjustment of themachinery, at the opening of eac...

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