Hitler and the Occult [NOOK Book]

Overview

Journalist Ken Anderson analyzes claims made by historian Trevor Ravenscroft and others that the Holy Lance, which is said to have pierced the side of Jesus Christ, took center stage in Hitler's life and was the focal point of Hitler's ambitions to conquer the world. In addition to pointing out the flaws in this theory, Anderson questions the veracity of the biblical story of the lance.

Was there some meaning behind the flight of Hitler deputy Rudolf Hoss to Britain, Hitler's ...

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Hitler and the Occult

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Overview

Journalist Ken Anderson analyzes claims made by historian Trevor Ravenscroft and others that the Holy Lance, which is said to have pierced the side of Jesus Christ, took center stage in Hitler's life and was the focal point of Hitler's ambitions to conquer the world. In addition to pointing out the flaws in this theory, Anderson questions the veracity of the biblical story of the lance.

Was there some meaning behind the flight of Hitler deputy Rudolf Hoss to Britain, Hitler's supposed extrasensory perception, his choice of the swastika as the Nazi symbol, the "superman" who haunted the Fuhrer, the use of Nostradamus in propaganda, the way Americans were taken in by the astrological propaganda war, and strange similarities between Hitler and Charlie Chaplin? Anderson offers rational explanations for these alleged strange events and powers, demonstrating that they cannot be attributed to Hitler.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
In this touching, if modest, memoir, Fuykschot recalls the daily problems her family endured during the WWII German occupation of Holland, which stretched from her 11th to her 15th year. She conveys the effect on the populace when Queen Wilhelmina fled to London-"We had lost our Queen, we were no longer a nation, we were nobodies..."-and the more devastating impact on the Fuykschot family when her father, an insurance inspector, was held in a hostage camp. After his release, the family suffered the increasing privation that was common across Holland: the absence of running water and electricity and the relentlessly diminishing food supply. During the grim winter of 1944-1945, children were sent into the countryside to beg for food at farmhouses. Fuykschot provides a dramatic account of the liberation of Utrecht by Canadian troops, who made such a favorable impression in ensuing weeks that scores of Dutch citizens ultimately moved to Canada ("Moving to Canada seemed to many like going to live with your big brother), including the author herself. Photos.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this touching, if modest, memoir, Fuykschot recalls the daily problems her family endured during the WWII German occupation of Holland, which stretched from her 11th to her 15th year. She conveys the effect on the populace when Queen Wilhelmina fled to London-``We had lost our Queen, we were no longer a nation, we were nobodies...''-and the more devastating impact on the Fuykschot family when her father, an insurance inspector, was held in a hostage camp. After his release, the family suffered the increasing privation that was common across Holland: the absence of running water and electricity and the relentlessly diminishing food supply. During the grim winter of 1944-1945, children were sent into the countryside to beg for food at farmhouses. Fuykschot provides a dramatic account of the liberation of Utrecht by Canadian troops, who made such a favorable impression in ensuing weeks that scores of Dutch citizens ultimately moved to Canada (``Moving to Canada seemed to many like going to live with your big brother), including the author herself. Photos. (Apr.)
Booknews
Takes a critical look at the evidence that Hitler may have been involved in the occult, and, disappointingly, finds that Winston Churchill had more ties to the occult through the Freemasons than did Hitler. Anderson analyzes various claims that Hitler believed the Holy Lance would help him conquer the world, and addresses other aspects of occult influence on the dictator, explaining the origins of his choice of the swastika as a symbol and the use of the predictions of Nostradamus in Nazi propaganda. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
Dennis Winters
Some of the most persistent myths about Hitler connect him with mysticism, occultism, and the supernatural. Anderson provides much-needed debunking of these legends, tracing most of the longest-lived to their sources and refuting them. The members of the secret Thule Society may have had something to do with the early Nazi Party, Anderson grants, but Hitler suppressed it once he was in power. A supposed relic of the Crucifixion, the Holy Lance, may have helped inspire the Grail legends and others, but there is no evidence that Hitler ever saw it. The man presented as the fuhrer's favorite astrologer both by himself and the Allies never met Hitler, much less consulted him. Many Nazis most notably, Himmler were obsessed by occultist mumbo jumbo, but Hitler laughed it off. "Und so weiter". Anderson's point is that Hitler was in the grip not of any supernatural force, but of his own twisted mind. He was an opportunist who exploited the superstition of others to further his own lust for power and destruction.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781615924004
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publication date: 4/1/1995
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Ken Anderson
KEN ANDERSON, of Georgetown, Texas, is Judge of the 277th District Court and the former longtime district attorney of Williamson County. He is a board-certified criminal law specialist and past president of the Texas District and County Attorneys Association. In 2000 he was named "Outstanding Prosecutor Upholding Victims' Rights" by the Texas Crime Victim Clearinghouse.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments 9
Introduction 11
Pt. 1 Hitler and the Occult 23
1 Springtime for Hitler 25
2 Hitler's Erratic Search 33
3 Hitler Discovers the Holy Lance 47
4 The Bible and the Holy Lance 55
5 Doubtful Sources 63
6 The Undergraduate Meets Hitler 71
7 Ravenscroft Meets Stein, and Goes to War 85
8 Hitler and the Opera 101
9 Hitler and Parsifal 107
10 Hitler and Providence 113
11 Secret Societies 125
12 The Swastika 141
13 Anschluss and the Lance 147
14 General Patton and the Holy Lance 153
15 Hitler and Occult Sex 159
16 Why? 167
Pt. 2 Hitler and the Cosmos 173
17 Astrology 175
18 De Wohl: The Man Behind the Man Behind Hitler 187
19 Nostradamus Goes to War 199
20 Hess: Hitler and His Deputy 207
21 Final Cosmic Predictions 221
22 Conclusions 231
Index 239
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 29, 2013

    I did not find anything compelling in this book. It was well doc

    I did not find anything compelling in this book. It was well documented, but hard to come to any conclusions. Sometimes it just seemed to meander. Chapter Four on the New Testament was very disappointing. He quotes and obscure religious writer obviously read The Passover Plot and The DaVinci code and regurgitates their time worn theories. Few people subscribe to those fantasies anymore. The most laughable theory he puts forth is that the Centurion was actually the Apostle John who speared Jesus in the right place so he could be easily resuscitated. Such drivel does not belong in a volume that presumes to be historical. If you really want to learn about Hitler and the occult this is not the book to read.

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