Hitler Sites: A City-by-City Guidebook (Austria, Germany, France, United States)

Overview

This work provides a unique service to historians by identifying over 150 places in Austria, Germany, France and the United States that are in some way associated with Adolf Hitler. The entry on Braunau am Inn (upper Austria) gives information on Hitler's birthplace, which is now a school for handicapped children. The entry for Klesheim Palace, built in 1700-1709 and renovated to Hitler's tastes for his guests, details such visitations as that of Benito Mussolini on April 22, 1941, the two dictators met at the ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (4) from $41.57   
  • New (2) from $41.57   
  • Used (2) from $72.60   
Sending request ...

Overview

This work provides a unique service to historians by identifying over 150 places in Austria, Germany, France and the United States that are in some way associated with Adolf Hitler. The entry on Braunau am Inn (upper Austria) gives information on Hitler's birthplace, which is now a school for handicapped children. The entry for Klesheim Palace, built in 1700-1709 and renovated to Hitler's tastes for his guests, details such visitations as that of Benito Mussolini on April 22, 1941, the two dictators met at the palace to discuss the Italian contribution to the war effort and German influence in Italy.

Each entry contains background information on the site and Hitler's connection to it, including relevant biographical data. Much of the information is translated from German sources and has never been printed in English before. The sites are grouped within their cities and are thoroughly indexed for easy access to information on every site.

Steven Lehrer is an associate professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Also the author of The Reich Chancellery and F├╝hrerbunker Complex (2005) and Wannsee House and the Holocaust (2000), he lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786424542
  • Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/14/2005
  • Pages: 228
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Steven Lehrer is an associate professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Also the author of The Reich Chancellery and F├╝hrerbunker Complex (2005) and Wannsee House and the Holocaust (2000), he lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2005

    Blaine Taylor review of Hitler Sites (Militaria International Vol 8 No. 6. p 64, June 2004)

    This is a fantastic, educational and well-written handy guidebook for all those readers either interested in World War II and Nazi Germany and wishing to know more or as a quick reference work for those more adventurous souls who want to visit these locations. If either desire is your goal, then this is definitely the book for you. Having been reading and writing articles and books myself about the Third Reich for the last four decades, I found this little volume (218 pages and 130 black and white photographs) delightfully entertaining and I¿m sure that you will, too. I found the book particularly interesting in its myriad of details on the various locations of places that Hitler lived before the Nazi Party came into governmental office on Jan. 30, 1933, and also of the many and varied early NSDAP headquarters buildings--and this is before the Brown House opened in Munich! Once that city was designated as the 'Capital of the Movement' by the Führer (Leader), there came the new Führerbau (Leader Building) where the Munich Conference of 1938 was held, and it is still possible today to visit the very building and room in which the Munich Agreement was signed. There is also featured the birthplace of the Party, Hitler's Prince Regent Street apartment where his romantic interest niece Geli Raubal shot herself (or was murdered by Hitler) in September 1931, and the tea rooms where the Führer liked to relax, such as the Carlton and his favorite, the Cafe Heck. There is also his favorite restaurant, the Ostaria Bavaria, where one can still eat today. One can also see the Beer Hall Putsch courtroom where he and the other co-conspirators were tried in 1923, as well as the jail where Hitler was incarcerated during it. Then there is Heinrich Hoffmann's studio where Adolf met Eva (Braun), a photographic sales shop girl and Hoffmann employee. Where did Pvt. Hitler take his basic training during the First World War ? It's here, plus the apartment of Ernst 'Putzi' (Cutie) Hanfstängl, who played the piano for him, wrote Nazi marching songs and was an early Party press secretary. Lance Corporal Hitler's Army barracks (in which he lived after the war as a spy on the tiny Nazi Party), and also the Landsberg am Lech prison where he was imprisoned following the failure of the putsch are included, too. It was there that he and fellow inmate Rudolf Hess (later Deputy Führer) wrote Mean Kampf (My Battle) which still sells worldwide today. Then there is Stadelheim Prison, where the arrested Storm Trooper leaders were first kept and then shot during the Nazi 'Blood Purge' of June 30-July 2, 1934. Outside Berlin there is the Kehlstein teahouse, the famous Eagle's Nest, presented to Hitler on Apr. 20, 1939 as a 50th birthday present by Reich Leader Martin Bormann. At Nuremberg, there are the various Party Congress buildings erected by architect Albert Speer, as well as the Deutscher Hof (German Hotel) in the city's downtown, where the Führer stayed each year during the mammoth Nazi rallies. Hitler's military headquarters are only briefly mentioned, but what is presented herein is interesting nonetheless. What I have presented here is only a tasty slice of a giant pie that you will want to eat in full. In closing, I will leave you with this teaser: what possible Hitler sites could there be in the US? I'm not going to tell you! For that, you'll just have to buy the book and read it for yourself. You'll be glad that you did.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)