Hitler's Japanese Confidant: General Oshima Hiroshi and Magic Intelligence, 1941-1945

Overview

In 1940 the U.S. Army Signal Intelligence Service broke the Japanese diplomatic code, but Oshima Hiroshi, Japan's ambassador to Berlin during World War II, never discovered that the hundreds of messages he transmitted to Tokyo were being fully decoded by the Americans and whisked off to Washington. Carl Boyd resurrects Oshima's decoded communications, which had remained classified for several decades. In them Oshima reveals the thoughts and strategies of Adolf Hitler and other high-ranking Nazis with whom he ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $14.95   
  • New (4) from $19.64   
  • Used (2) from $14.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

In 1940 the U.S. Army Signal Intelligence Service broke the Japanese diplomatic code, but Oshima Hiroshi, Japan's ambassador to Berlin during World War II, never discovered that the hundreds of messages he transmitted to Tokyo were being fully decoded by the Americans and whisked off to Washington. Carl Boyd resurrects Oshima's decoded communications, which had remained classified for several decades. In them Oshima reveals the thoughts and strategies of Adolf Hitler and other high-ranking Nazis with whom he associated. In addition to providing illuminating insight into Nazi activities and attitudes, Boyd demonstrates how the intelligence gathered by teams of American cryptographers influenced Allied strategy and helped bring about the downfall of Hitler and his Japanese confidant.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Allied cryptographers broke the Japanese diplomatic code in 1941, after which Ambassador Oshima Hiroshi's messages from Berlin to Tokyo were intercepted, deciphered, translated and passed along to U.S. and British intelligence operatives. Gen. George Marshall, the U.S. Army chief of staff, called the Oshima intercepts the ``main basis of information regarding Hitler's intentions in Europe.'' Oshima inadvertently provided the Allies with advance information about Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union, the Axis buildup in North Africa and the Wehrmacht's defensive system along the Normandy coast (which proved vital to the success of the Allied invasion of June 1944). In this valuable study, Boyd carefully analyzes Oshima's messages and reports, places them in political and military contexts, and sheds new light on Germany's strategies during the war as well as on German-Japanese relations. Oshima died in 1975, never having learned that the enemy had read his mail throughout WW II. Boyd is a history professor at Old Dominion University in Virginia. Photos. (Mar.)
Library Journal
General Oshima, Japan's ambassador to Berlin throughout World War II, sent detailed reports to Tokyo on his Axis partner. Oshima was an intelligent observer, and from his notes we are able to obtain a new view of Germany. Unbeknownst to Oshima, the Japanese diplomatic code had been broken by the United States, and the ambassador's comments proved to be of great value to the Allies. Indeed, the information gathered from deciphered Japanese codes was called Magic. Author Boyd (history, Old Dominion Univ.) here presents two works: one deals with observations on Germany and the other with the uses of military intelligence. Because there is little available on Magic during the conflict, this book fills a definite need. Combined with Ronald Lewin's The American Magic: Codes, Ciphers, and the Defeat of Japan (Farrar, 1982), this will give readers a good understanding of Magic. Recommended for academic libraries and large public libraries. Smaller libraries may also want to purchase in order to give their users a background on intelligence work in World War II.-- Dennis L. Noble, Lewistown P.L. , Mont.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780700611898
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas
  • Publication date: 3/28/1993
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations, Tables, and Maps
Foreword
Preface
List of Abbreviations
Introduction 1
1 Oshima and the MAGIC Road to Pearl Harbor 17
2 Oshima's MAGIC Messages in the Aftermath of Pearl Harbor 40
3 The MAGIC Perspective of Strategic Change in 1942 57
4 MAGIC and the Enigma of the Eastern Front 75
5 MAGIC Intelligence during the President's Travels in 1943 96
6 The MAGIC of OVERLORD and the Surprise of the Ardennes 117
7 MAGIC and the Question of a German-Soviet Separate Peace 140
8 MAGIC and the End of the Third Reich 162
Appendix 1: MAGIC Messages Concerning a Visit of the Japanese Ambassador in Berlin to the German Defenses in France 185
Appendix 2: Letter from Eisenhower to Major General Sir Stewart Menzies 193
Appendix 3: Intelligence Agreement between the United States and Great Britain 195
Appendix 4: Letter from Marshall to Eisenhower 199
Notes 203
Bibliography 243
Index 263
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)