Hitler's War: World War II as Portrayed by Signal, the International Nazi Propaganda Magazine

Hitler's War: World War II as Portrayed by Signal, the International Nazi Propaganda Magazine

by Jeremy Harwood
     
 

The downfall of Nazi Germany, as seen through its own media. The first issue of Signal magazine, Germany's biweekly army propaganda publication, hit the newsstands in April of 1940. The magazine's readership grew dramatically as the Nazi empire expanded across Europe, and by 1943 its circulation was roughly 2.5 million. At its outset,

…  See more details below

Overview

The downfall of Nazi Germany, as seen through its own media. The first issue of Signal magazine, Germany's biweekly army propaganda publication, hit the newsstands in April of 1940. The magazine's readership grew dramatically as the Nazi empire expanded across Europe, and by 1943 its circulation was roughly 2.5 million. At its outset, Signal was brashly optimistic, packed full of photographs celebrating the Third Reich's triumph over its enemies—but the last issue would appear on April 12, 1945, just weeks before the Reich's surrender. In Hitler's War, historian Jeremy Harwood charts the downfall of the Nazi regime through the lens of Signal magazine, from the heady days of the Blitzkrieg—when a German victory seemed to be just around the corner—to the way the publication faced up to the Reich's ultimate decline and fall. Harwood's fascinating commentary supplements reproduced page spreads from actual issues of the magazine, placing modern analysis next to authentic period writing from the German military. As the tide of war swings inexorably against Nazi Germany, with no more victories to celebrate, Harwood traces the shifting of Signal's editorial emphasis from confident news and gossip to desperate, sensationalist heroism. Offering a brand-new window into the Third Reich's public strategy, Hitler's War puts the magazine content into accurate historical context, showing how, after 1943, the picture of Nazi Germany that Signal presented was ever more increasingly at odds with reality.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"

Paging through this well-wrought collection can be slightly surreal, like looking into an alternative past, but also fascinating" - World War II magazine

STARRED REVIEW "Modeled after Picture Post in Britain and Life and National Geographic in the United States, Signal magazine was Nazi ­Germany's most successful wartime propaganda publication; its peak circulation reached 2.5 million copies per issue. This chronicle of the magazine's life span, which mirrors that of the Third Reich (April 1940-March 1945), ­offers a fascinatingly rich and detailed German civilian-centric account and viewpoint of the war, world, and culture. In both full pages and snippets clipped from the publication, every front of the spectacle of war and the German perspective is examined and framed chronologically-the battles and conquests, articles, ads, graphics, human-interest stories, and entertainment/society coverage-with that selective intonation and controlled word choice we've become fascinated with in propaganda and that no doubt propels its enduring intrigue. Owing dually to the effective production value of the publication and Harwood's (The Secret History of Freemasonry) deft presentation of the material, though the story is understood (and it's impossible not to measure the text retrospectively, knowingly aware of the gravity and sensational delusion), this book feels immediate and intimate. ­VERDICT Carrying an organic empirical quality rarely facilitated by a historical text, this rich and fascinating study is for World War II enthusiasts, historians, socioculturalists, and journalists." - Library Journal

Library Journal
★ 06/15/2014
Modeled after Picture Post in Britain and Life and National Geographic in the United States, Signal magazine was Nazi Germany's most successful wartime propaganda publication; its peak circulation reached 2.5 million copies per issue. This chronicle of the magazine's life span, which mirrors that of the Third Reich (April 1940–March 1945), offers a fascinatingly rich and detailed German civilian-centric account and viewpoint of the war, world, and culture. In both full pages and snippets clipped from the publication, every front of the spectacle of war and the German perspective is examined and framed chronologically—the battles and conquests, articles, ads, graphics, human-interest stories, and entertainment/society coverage—with that selective intonation and controlled word choice we've become fascinated with in propaganda and that no doubt propels its enduring intrigue. Owing dually to the effective production value of the publication and Harwood's (The Secret History of Freemasonry) deft presentation of the material, though the story is understood (and it's impossible not to measure the text retrospectively, knowingly aware of the gravity and sensational delusion), this book feels immediate and intimate. VERDICT Carrying an organic empirical quality rarely facilitated by a historical text, this rich and fascinating study is for World War II enthusiasts, historians, socioculturalists, and journalists.—Benjamin Malczewski, Toledo-Lucas Cty. P.L.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760346211
Publisher:
Zenith Press
Publication date:
06/15/2014
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
952,021
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Jeremy Harwood will be bringing together a team of academic experts headed by Dr. Bendall. Jeremy studied history at Christ Church, Oxford. He has conceived, edited, and authored books including the Dictionary of Battles (Henry Holt), The Secret History of Freemasonry (Lorenz), and Command (Crown), as well as being head of History and General Reference Publishing for Reader's Digest in the United Kingdom.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >