Hits I Missed...And One I Didn't

( 3 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The idea for Hits I Missed...And One I Didn't is a good one: George Jones looks back over the years and picks songs that he originally declined to record, only to see other artists having hits, sometimes very big hits, with them. This is a clever concept in a couple of ways, since it not only gives a glimpse at what could have been not just for George, but for the artists who had the hits -- imagine if Bobby Bare never had a big break into the country charts with "Detroit City", but it gives a strong, cohesive theme for an album, which is something George has occasionally lacked in his veteran years. Working with producer Keith Stegall, who has helmed his ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The idea for Hits I Missed...And One I Didn't is a good one: George Jones looks back over the years and picks songs that he originally declined to record, only to see other artists having hits, sometimes very big hits, with them. This is a clever concept in a couple of ways, since it not only gives a glimpse at what could have been not just for George, but for the artists who had the hits -- imagine if Bobby Bare never had a big break into the country charts with "Detroit City", but it gives a strong, cohesive theme for an album, which is something George has occasionally lacked in his veteran years. Working with producer Keith Stegall, who has helmed his records since his lean neo-traditional comeback The Cold Hard Truth, George sticks to simple, straightforward hard country arrangements played by such stalwarts as pianist Pig Robbins and guitarist Brent Mason, and there's a warm, relaxed vibe to this house band of Music City pros that not only gives Jones a comfortable setting, but enhances the material. The songs may span several eras, yet they're all firmly within classic country tradition and while most are well-known standards, there are a couple of nice left-field choices a version of Hank Jr.'s "The Blues Man" performed as a duet with Dolly Parton; Jack Moran and Glenn Tubb's sublime "Skip a Rope," which was popularized by Henson Cargill that keep this from sounding overly familiar. The nicest thing about the album is that the arrangements are pure enough that it's easy to envision how these songs would have sounded if Jones had sung them first, but George's performances are those of a veteran who has paid his dues several times over, giving the album a comfortably worn, lived-in feel. Nowhere is that better heard than the one hit that he didn't miss, "He Stopped Loving Her Today," which Jones was not eager to record in 1980 and only cut upon the insistence of his producer, Billy Sherrill. He revisits it here, claiming in his nice track-by-track liner notes that he's "learned to sing it better," and while that point is debatable -- and certainly this recording, as strong as it is, can't compare to the epic original -- it is true that George sings it differently here, finding new meanings in lines that he's sung countless times before. Only the greatest singers can do that, and Jones once again proves here that he is truly one of America's best singers. What's nice about Hits I Missed is that, apart from the clever concept, he's finally given a consistent set of songs to showcase his skills as a veteran singer, and the result is a subdued little gem.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/13/2005
  • Label: Bandit Records
  • UPC: 015707979221
  • Catalog Number: 79792
  • Sales rank: 26,020

Album Credits

Performance Credits
George Jones Primary Artist, Vocals
Rhonda Vincent Vocals, Background Vocals
Dolly Parton Vocals
John Wesley Ryles Background Vocals
Eddie Bayers Drums
Larry Franklin Fiddle, Mandolin
Paul Franklin Dobro, Steel Guitar
Liana Manis Background Vocals
Brent Mason Electric Guitar
Hargus "Pig" Robbins Piano
Bruce Watkins Acoustic Guitar
Glenn Worf Bass, Bass Guitar
Marty Slayton Background Vocals
Sheri Copeland Background Vocals
Technical Credits
Vern Gosdin Composer
Merle Haggard Composer
Willie Nelson Composer
Paul Overstreet Composer
Mel Tillis Composer
Max D. Barnes Composer
Bobby Braddock Composer
Bobby Harden Composer
Harlan Howard Composer
Alan Jackson Composer
John Kelton Engineer
Bonnie Owens Composer
Curly Putman Composer
Keith Stegall Producer, Audio Production
Hank Williams Jr. Composer
Jack Moran Composer
Danny Dill Composer
Don Schlitz Composer
Mark Irwin Composer
Glenn Tubb Composer
H.B. Hall Composer
Matt Rovey Engineer
Jeff Crump Graphic Design
Susan Nadler Executive Producer
Evelyn Shriver Executive Producer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    George Jones is the best

    Even though he was not the one to originally record these songs, it is great that he has put his own spin on them. I don't think he is trying to steal the limelight from the original artists, since older country music singers are rarely played on today's country music radio. I am glad to see that George Jones and other legenday artists are still able to make new albums with new music and have the albums go gold or platinum with out any help from country radio. These legendary singers do not get the radio time that they deserve, today. The country music media would rather do a 30 minute interview with a new one hit wonder instead of a legend. I think that the country music industry is trying way to hard to keep up with POP music. They need to keep it real, and that's what George Jones and other legends are attempting to do. But can they continue to compete with the likes of Carrie Underwood or Kellie Pickler, who have a billion dollar industry behind them and unlimited media and radio exposure? I hope that the country legends continue to make new music, someone has to show the one hit wonders what this business is all about.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    He missed them let it go

    George Jones is just attempting to steal the spotlight away from the artists who were smart enough to record songs that weren't good enough for him at the time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews