The Hittite

( 9 )

Overview

Bova offers an exciting new take on the timeless legend of Troy. Lukka travels across Greece seeking the brutal slave traders who kidnapped his wife and sons. He tracks them to war-torn Troy, where he proves himself a warrior to rank with Hector and Achilles.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (3) from $41.37   
  • New (1) from $126.04   
  • Used (2) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$126.04
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(920)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
The Hittite

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$7.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Bova offers an exciting new take on the timeless legend of Troy. Lukka travels across Greece seeking the brutal slave traders who kidnapped his wife and sons. He tracks them to war-torn Troy, where he proves himself a warrior to rank with Hector and Achilles.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Excellent.  A thrilling and inventive retelling of the legend of Troy."
--David Hagberg, New York Times bestselling author of The Expediter

"Completely convincing and emotionally satisfying; the adventure and warfare are gripping enough to keep me awake to finish the book in a single night.  I hope that when I'm [Bova's] age, I'll be doing--as he is--the best work of my career."
--Orson Scott Card, New York Times bestselling author of Ender's Game

"A cast of stars, all seen through the eyes of a Hittite warrior. With authentic battle scenes and the reality of siege warfare, THE HITTITE is an adventure you'll want to undertake."
--Barbara D'Amato, Mary Higgins Clark award-winning author of Foolproof

“Bova gets better and better, combining plausible science with increasingly complex fiction.”
—Daily News (Los Angeles)
 

“Bova proves himself equal to the task of showing how adversity can temper character in unforeseen ways.”
—The New York Times
 
“[A] cautionary but hopeful thriller… modern twists and a genuinely surprising ending.”
—Publishers Weekly on The Green Trap

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441728135
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/13/2010
  • Format: CD
  • Pages: 9
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Ben Bova is the author of more than a hundred works of science fact and fiction. He is a six-time winner of science fiction's Hugo Award, a former editor of Analog and former fiction editor of Omni, and a past president of the Nation Space Society and the Science Fiction Writers of America.

Stefan Rudnicki, a Grammy-winning audiobook producer, has narrated more than one hundred audiobooks. A recipient of multiple AudioFile Earphones Awards, he was awarded the coveted Audie® Award for solo narration in both 2005 and 2007, and was named as one of AudioFile's Best Voices of the Year in 2008.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

1

The dreadful news reached us when we were less than a day’s march from the capital, returning home after a long, hard campaign against the wily Armenians, in the mountains far to the north. The gods had turned their backs on our rightful emperor; he had been poisoned by his own scheming sons. Now, lusting for the power their father had wielded, the sons made war on one another.

The empire of the Hatti stretched from beyond the twin peaks of Mount Ararat in the northeast to the shores of the Great Sea. Our armies sacked Babylon and fought the prideful Egyptians at Qadesh and Megiddo in the gaunt lands of Canaan. With swords of iron and discipline even stronger we conquered all that we encountered.

Except ourselves.

Now Hattusas, our capital, had crumbled into chaos. Even before we reached its outer wall we could hear the tumult of terrified voices wailing to the gods for protection. It seemed as if the city’s entire population was streaming out of the gates: white-bearded men, aged grandmothers, children wide-eyed with fear, whole families pushing carts loaded with their meager possessions, mothers with crying babies in their arms, all blindly fleeing. Smoke was rising from the citadel up on the hill in the center of the city, an ugly black plume staining the clouded sky.

I knew what each of my men was thinking: what’s happened to my family, my wife, my children, my mother and father? I felt that fear clutch at my own heart as we reached the city’s main gate.

“Stay together,” I commanded my squad. “March in step.”

I knew that we would need iron discipline now more than ever. They obeyed, good soldiers that they were. Instinct born of hard training made us move as one unit, spears at the ready.

Once inside the gates the stream of fleeing populace turned into a torrent of people ashen with panic, all rushing to get away from the city. And we saw why. Gangs of young men were marauding drunkenly through the twisting streets, breaking into houses and shops, stealing all that they could carry, brutally raping any women they found. Screams and pleas for mercy filled the air.

“Where are the constables?” one of my men cried.

Gone, I realized. With the emperor dead and his sons warring against each other, order and safety had collapsed into lawlessness.

A woman with a baby in her arms and two more little ones trailing behind her rushed up to me, her face twisted by fear.

“Soldiers! Help us! Protect us!”

My instinct was to fight these drunken looters, to safeguard the defenseless people they were preying upon. But all I had was my squad of twenty. Twenty men against hundreds, one squad of soldiers against a city in anarchy. It was hopeless.

“Leave the city while you can,” I told her. “Get away until this madness burns itself out.”

She stared at me, disbelieving. Then she spat on me. My hand flew to the pommel of my sword. I told her through gritted teeth, “Get away while you can. Leave while you’re still alive.”

She turned and hurried to rejoin the stream of people fleeing for the city’s gates.

“Stay in order,” I shouted to my squad. “We can’t fight them all.”

The men grumbled but we marched on, eyes forward, shields on our arms and spears upright, up the narrow street that led to the citadel and to the home of my father, where my wife and sons lived. Three of my men had family in the city, I knew. The rest came from elsewhere in the empire.

“We’re going to the citadel. From there you can go to your families or to the barracks,” I told my men.

We marched toward the citadel, toward the house of my father.

The gangs gave us wide berth as we marched in step up the cobbled main street toward the citadel. Twenty men in the emperor’s gear, each armed with a nine-foot spear and killing sword were enough to make most of them melt away from us. Someone threw a rock that bounced off my shield. When the twenty of us wheeled and leveled our spears in that direction, the looters scattered away like the vermin they were, scurrying for safety.

“Stay together,” I repeated, resuming our march up the street. As usual, I stayed on the right end of our line, since I am left-handed and wear my shield on my right arm. Thus we presented a solid line of shields from end to end.

It was hard to watch the rioters looting and roaring, staggering from house to house, dragging out shrieking terrified women, and do nothing. Dead bodies lay in the street. Blood ran in the gutter down its middle. Young toughs in knots of four and five lurched from shop to shop, flagons of wine in their blood-soaked hands. I even saw bands of soldiers, still wearing the emperor’s leather and iron, smashing and looting alongside the wild-eyed gangs.

“We’ll tend to our own families,” I repeated to my men. “There’s nothing we can do for the others.”

Truly, the city was in anarchy. Twenty soldiers would not be able to restore order. Twenty hundred were needed. The streets smelled of blood and panic. Smoke was thickening in the sky.

The stone tower of the citadel, up atop the hill, was in flames. Fire and death are ever the twin sons of war, and the black smoke rising from the royal palace told me that the gods had turned their backs on the Hatti. My home was hard by the high wall that encircled the citadel. My father, my wife, my two little sons were there. So I hoped.

“Stay in order,” I called to my men. “I’ll drub the man who breaks ranks.”

We marched onward toward the burning citadel. None of the drunken looters came near us. Brave they were with their clubs and daggers against cringing women and quaking old men; against a disciplined squad of armed spearmen they made no opposition. We marched upslope along the cobbled street and everyone gave us a wide berth.

Most of my men were too young to be married. They lived in the barracks inside the citadel wall. The three who had homes to go to I released once we reached the wall, with orders to rejoin the squad before nightfall. The others milled about uncertainly.

“Stay together,” I told them. “Go to the barracks and save what you can. Then form up again here, by this house.”

It was the house of my father, the house where I had been born. And my sons, as well.

Like all the others along the street, my father’s house was braced along the citadel wall. Built of well-fitted stone, it leaned slightly aslant. Its one window was tightly shuttered, but the door was ajar, leaning crookedly on its hinges. Not a good sign, I thought. The roof thatch was smoldering, probably from a spark wafted on the breeze. The very air was thickening with smoke from the burning citadel.

I stepped into the shadowy interior of the house, my eyes quickly adjusting to the gloom. My heart sank. The room had been ransacked; table overturned, chairs smashed to splinters. The fireplace was cold and dark. I looked up to the loft where the beds were; silent, empty. The bedclothes had been torn off and ripped.

Then, in the far corner where my father had often told me tales of war and conquest, I saw his withered body on the packed earthen floor, huddled beneath a bloodstained cloak.

I had seen dead bodies before, by the score, by the hundreds. Yet the sight of my father there in the shadows made my throat go dry. I sank to my knees beside him and gently, gently turned him so I could see his face.

They had battered him terribly. Yet his eyes fluttered, then focused on me.

“Lukka . . .” His voice was a tortured sigh.

“Don’t try to speak. Let me—”

He clutched at my arm, his aged fleshless fingers still as strong as a hawk’s talons. “I knew you would return.” He coughed painfully. “I knew . . .”

“Quiet, Father. Quiet. I’ll get a healer, a priest.”

“No need. No use.”

He coughed blood.

“Your sons,” he gasped. “Gone . . .”

“Gone? Where?”

“They fled.” He coughed again, his frail body spasming in my arms. “Your wife was mad with panic. Slavers were breaking into the houses . . .”

“Slavers?”

“She feared them . . . she took my grandsons . . .”

The third child of war, I thought. The poor wretches who were not killed or maimed were made into slaves.

“Find them!” my father commanded me. Gripping my arm even harder, he hissed, “Find them. My grandsons. They are my flesh. Find them, Lukka. Find them!”

Those were his last words to me. He died in my arms, his blood soaking into the earthen floor while smoke from the burning thatch made my eyes sting and water.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Not What I Expected

    Considering that books of this type are really fictionalized history I was hoping for a different perspective on a infamous event in history. What you get is yet another misogynistic point of view. All women are worthless unless they can bear sons. Helen almost gets a pass because she is supposedly the most beautiful woman in the world. But Bova's Helen has learned to survive in a world where women are chattel by being manipulative, inconstant and incredibly self-centered. She becomes exactly what the men of this age believe women to be. But considering the fate that awaits the wife of the Hittite for doing what is necessary to preserve the lives of her children who can really blame Helen. If the point of the book was to expose the injustices women faced during this time in history then it succeeded. However I found I truly didn't care about what the 2 main characters went through or if they survived at all.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    interesting retelling of the Trojan Horse

    The Empire of the Hatti had defeated the Babylonians, Egyptians and many more, but face defeat from within by treachery. The emperor was stripped of his clothing by his sons and hence the Gods abandoned Hatti. Lukka leads his military unit home seeing the capital Hattusas ablaze from a distance. When they arrive inside the burning city they see gangs of drunken youths looting and killing. Lukka finds his dying father who informs him that his wife and sons might live, but are gone as property of the slavers.

    He concludes his family would be sold in Troy. Leading his force to Troy, he finds the city under seize by the Achaians, whose lack of discipline makes Lukka ill to need them as an ally. He learns his spouse is a slave and vows to rescue her anyway he can and to learn the fate of his sons. Thus he begins the construct of a wooden horse that if he understands human nature should enable him to see "the face that launched a thousand ships".

    This is an interesting retelling of the Trojan Horse with the above description only the beginning as the reader also for instance obtains Helen's side of the saga instead of the usual male machismo as she is all these super hunks' Achilles heel. Lukka is a fascinating military leader who understands war has three offspring: death, maiming and slavery. He knows when his men fight, some will die, some will be maimed, and maybe a few captured and tortured as slaves. Fans will enjoy Ben Bova's rendition of part of Homer's the Iliad

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)