Hittite Warrior

Hittite Warrior

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by Joanne S. Williamson
     
 

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When Uriah Tarhund's Hititte home is destroyed by invading Greeks, his dying father tells him to go seek a Canaanite named Sisera, "He will help you. For my sake...." When Uriah reaches Judea and saves a young boy from being sacrificed to Molech, he is given succor for a time by the Hebrews. Later, he finds Sisera and joins him in war against these same people. When

Overview

When Uriah Tarhund's Hititte home is destroyed by invading Greeks, his dying father tells him to go seek a Canaanite named Sisera, "He will help you. For my sake...." When Uriah reaches Judea and saves a young boy from being sacrificed to Molech, he is given succor for a time by the Hebrews. Later, he finds Sisera and joins him in war against these same people. When the Canaanites arc defeated, the young Hititte has the opportunity to come to a peace with himself, the Hebrew people and their God.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Uriah-Tarhund, a teenage warrior orphaned by the conquering Achaean army, flees his homeland in the Hittite Empire to find his way among hostile armies and kind strangers in this coming-of-age tale set in the Middle East in 1200 B.C. The novel blends archeological sources, fictional characters, and the story of a great battle between the Canaanites and the Hebrews recounted in the fourth chapter of the Bible's Book of Judges. Sometimes by accident, sometimes by design, Uriah journeys from one ancient city to the next, from friend to foe, as he seeks a safe refuge, and to uphold the honor of the Hittites, while keeping promises to his late father and to friends made along the way. Place names and characters names are so exotic that to young readers they may sound like monikers from modern books of fantasy and science fiction. The only thing that holds this book back from mainstream appeal as a historical adventure story is its heavy use of both biblical and historical references, which sometimes overload the plot, especially in the later chapters. First published in 1960 by Knopf, this reprinted edition includes an introduction for Christian home-educators that suggests how to teach the book and also how to extend its learning value with readings from the Bible. Uriah's engaging story will have value both to students interested in ancient civilizations and to students of the Bible; it does not read like a book aimed exclusively at a religious audience. The author wrote six other historical novels for children, including books set during the French Revolution, Julius Caesar's Rome, and a retelling of Shakespeare's Henry VI trilogy. 1999 (orig. 1960), Bethlehem Books, Ages 10 up.
—J. H. Diehl

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883937386
Publisher:
Bethlehem Books
Publication date:
04/28/1999
Series:
Living History Library
Pages:
237
Sales rank:
233,809
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
11 - 17 Years

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Hittite Warrior 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
The story, set in the 12th century before Christ when Deborah was judge in Israel, is about a Uriah, a thirteen-year-old Hittite youth, who is driven from his home when his family was killed by the invading Greeks, given aid by a Canaanite boy of Tyre and his family, flees to the Jews with an Israelite boy when they rescue a child who is to be sacrificed to Moloch, runs away from there to find a Canaanite friend of his father's at Harosheth, is forced to fight with the Canaanites against the Jews at Mt. Tabor when Deborah and Barak muster the Hebrews, and is finally received by the Israelites as a scribe. The author weaves into her narrative a great deal of accurate historical information about the important events, geography, and interactions among the nations of that time. It is a gripping story. I had trouble putting the book down and finished its 28 chapters in less than a week. One of the things that I liked about it was that to those who are familiar with the account of Deborah and Barak in Judges chapter 4 it is interesting to come across the foreshadowings of that in the plot and to have that feeling that our older son Mark often expressed when I would be reading aloud some story with which he may be a little familiar, "Oh, I think I know where this is going." Also, the book emphasizes the importance of keeping promises and chronicles the changes in Uriah's life as he is influenced by the monotheistic teaching of the Israelites.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hittite Warrior tells about a Hittite boy, Uriah Tarhaund, and his adventures after his family is killed by the Greeks, or as they are referred to, the 'Sea People'. Told by his father, he promised to go to Siseria, a man in Canaan. He is brought to Tyre to be rewarded for saving a merchant from thieves. He is 'adopted' into the family. One of the servants of the merchants father, Ethbaal, saves a child from being sacrificed to their God, Moloch. Forced by the servant, Jotham, to come with him, he lives with Jotham's Hebrew tribe for a while. Keeping his promise, Uriah went to Siseria but was captured on the way. After being released he took part in defending Canaan from the Hebrews. He looses the battle and retreats across the river Kishon to Dor in the company of another soldier. He returns to Ethbaal to save his daughter, Mehitable, from the Philistines. The end of the story is very touching. I found the tale extremely intriguing. It had some facts regarding the structures of buildings, the chariots, etc... There is, for those of you who like war, a battle in the story. I find it a very good book for a person in their early teens.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is revolting in every way. It was very confusing and disapointing. I do not reccomend this book to anyone!