×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Hochelaga: Or, England in the New World
     

Hochelaga: Or, England in the New World

by George Warburton
 

See All Formats & Editions

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. QUEBEC—HISTORICAL SKETCH OF CANADA. Take mountain and plain, sinuous river and broad tranquil waters, stately ship and tiny boat, gentle hill and shady

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. QUEBEC—HISTORICAL SKETCH OF CANADA. Take mountain and plain, sinuous river and broad tranquil waters, stately ship and tiny boat, gentle hill and shady valley, bold headland and rich fruitful fields, frowning battlement and cheerful villa, glittering dome and rural spire, flowery garden and sombre forest—group them all into the choicest picture of ideal beauty your fancy can create, arch it over with a cloudless sky, light it up with a radiant sun, and, lest the sheen should be too dazzling, hang a veil of lightest haze over'all, to soften the lines and perfect the repose—you will then have seen Quebec on this September morning. The river St. Charles, winding through low, rich grounds, empties itself into a wide basin, closed in, to the north-east, by the island of Orleans. In the angle it makes with the St. Lawrence is a lofty promontory; there stands the city, walled and hastioned round. On an undulating slope, rising gradually from the margin of the smaller stream to the foot of the hattlements, lie the suburbs of St. Roch and St. Valier; St. John's spreads up the shoulder of the height, along the land face of the defences; St. Louis is the continuation; thence, to the river St. Lawrence, is open ground. On the highest point of the promontory, and the most advanced into the stream, is Cape Diamond, the strongest citadel in the New World. On the river side, a hundred yards of perpendicular rock forbid the foot of man; another is fenced off from the town by a massive fortification and broad glacis; the third side of the grim triangle looks out upon the plains of Abraham, in a line of armed ramparts. The lower town is built upon a narrow strip of land, saved from the water, under the lofty cliffs of the promontory, stretching from the suburb of St. Roch to...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026565207
Publisher:
Wiley & Putnam
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
856 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. QUEBEC—HISTORICAL SKETCH OF CANADA. Take mountain and plain, sinuous river and broad tranquil waters, stately ship and tiny boat, gentle hill and shady valley, bold headland and rich fruitful fields, frowning battlement and cheerful villa, glittering dome and rural spire, flowery garden and sombre forest—group them all into the choicest picture of ideal beauty your fancy can create, arch it over with a cloudless sky, light it up with a radiant sun, and, lest the sheen should be too dazzling, hang a veil of lightest haze over'all, to soften the lines and perfect the repose—you will then have seen Quebec on this September morning. The river St. Charles, winding through low, rich grounds, empties itself into a wide basin, closed in, to the north-east, by the island of Orleans. In the angle it makes with the St. Lawrence is a lofty promontory; there stands the city, walled and hastioned round. On an undulating slope, rising gradually from the margin of the smaller stream to the foot of the hattlements, lie the suburbs of St. Roch and St. Valier; St. John's spreads up the shoulder of the height, along the land face of the defences; St. Louis is the continuation; thence, to the river St. Lawrence, is open ground. On the highest point of the promontory, and the most advanced into the stream, is Cape Diamond, the strongest citadel in the New World. On the river side, a hundred yards of perpendicular rock forbid the foot of man; another is fenced off from the town by a massive fortification and broad glacis; the third side of the grim triangle looks out upon the plains of Abraham, in a line of armed ramparts. The lower town is built upon a narrow strip of land,saved from the water, under the lofty cliffs of the promontory, stretching from the suburb of St. Roch to...

Meet the Author

1816-1857

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews