Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities

Overview


The social practice of forming, shaping, expressing, contesting, and maintaining personal identities makes human interaction, and therefore society, possible. Our identities give us our sense of how we are supposed to act and how we may or must treat others, so how we hold each other in our identities is of crucial moral importance. To hold someone in her identity is to treat her according to the stories one uses to make sense of who she is. Done well, holding allows individuals to flourish personally and in ...
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Overview


The social practice of forming, shaping, expressing, contesting, and maintaining personal identities makes human interaction, and therefore society, possible. Our identities give us our sense of how we are supposed to act and how we may or must treat others, so how we hold each other in our identities is of crucial moral importance. To hold someone in her identity is to treat her according to the stories one uses to make sense of who she is. Done well, holding allows individuals to flourish personally and in their interactions with others; done poorly, it diminishes their self-respect and restricts their participation in social life. If the identity is to represent accurately the person who bears it, the tissue of stories that constitute it must continue to change as the person grows and changes. Here, good holding is a matter of retaining the stories that still depict the person but letting go of the ones that no longer do. The book begins with a puzzling instance of personhood, where the work of holding someone in her identity is tragically one-sided. It then traces this work of holding and letting go over the human life span, paying special attention to its implications for bioethics. A pregnant woman starts to call her fetus into personhood. Children develop their moral agency as they learn to hold themselves and others in their identities. Ordinary adults hold and let go, sometimes well and sometimes badly. People bearing damaged or liminal identities leave others uncertain how to hold and what to let go. Identities are called into question at the end of life, and persist after the person has died. In all, the book offers a glimpse into a fascinating moral terrain that is ripe for philosophical exploration.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"In this wonderfully wise book Hilde Lindemann weaves stories into theory to help us see how we weave stories into lives, and how through these stories we hold each other in personhood-for good and for ill. Her stories put flesh on the dry bones of much-discussed, overly-abstracted philosophical problems; and in so doing she makes a case for philosophical theorizing as an embodied, engaged, emotionally and socially responsive practice."--Naomi Scheman, University of Minnesota

"With her characteristic lucid and engaging prose, Hilde Lindemann combines philosophical depth with richness of concrete detail in her new book -- a book that significantly extends and deepens the narrative approach to bioethics that she founded in her Damaged Identities; Narrative Repair. In Holding and Letting Go, she compellingly demonstrates how identity and personhood are substantial achievements that often depend upon the help and participation of others. This important book shows the complexity of issues concerning personal identity, intimacy, and embodiment, and their centrality to key debates in the ethics of health care throughout the life cycle."--Rebecca Kukla, Georgetown University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199754922
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 1/3/2014
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 435,462
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Hilde Lindemann is Professor of Philosophy at Michigan State University. A Fellow of the Hastings Center and a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, she is also a former editor of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, and the Hastings Center Report. She has written widely on narrative approaches to bioethics, feminist ethics, the ethics of families, and the social construction of persons and their identities.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1. What Child Is This? The Practice of Personhood
2. The Architect and The Bee: Calling the Fetus into Personhood
3. Second Persons: The Work of Identity Formation
4. Ordinary Identity-Work: How We Usually Go On
5. Struggling to Catch Up: Challenges to Identity-Work
6. What and When to Let Go: Identities at the End of Life
7. What Does It All Mean?
References
Index

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