BN.com Gift Guide

Holiday Visitor (Harlequin Super Romance #1527) [NOOK Book]

Overview


Marybeth Lawson has the life she's always wanted. And it all revolves around her cozy bed-and-breakfast. As busy as it keeps her, there is no room for romance, which is fine with her. Then one Christmas, the very good-looking Craig McKellips reserves a room--and everything changes. The attraction between them is intense and instant.

With each visit, the connection between them deepens and Marybeth marvels as the wall around her heart crumbles. Could Craig be the one? Then he ...

See more details below
Holiday Visitor (Harlequin Super Romance #1527)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.99
BN.com price

Overview


Marybeth Lawson has the life she's always wanted. And it all revolves around her cozy bed-and-breakfast. As busy as it keeps her, there is no room for romance, which is fine with her. Then one Christmas, the very good-looking Craig McKellips reserves a room--and everything changes. The attraction between them is intense and instant.

With each visit, the connection between them deepens and Marybeth marvels as the wall around her heart crumbles. Could Craig be the one? Then he reveals a shocking secret that threatens their relationship. Now Marybeth must pick up the pieces and discover what it means to really know someone...and love them anyway.


Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781426824562
  • Publisher: Harlequin Enterprises
  • Publication date: 4/1/2008
  • Series: Harlequin Super Romance Series , #1527
  • Sold by: HARLEQUIN
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 877,563
  • File size: 220 KB

Meet the Author




Tara Taylor Quinn's love affair with Harlequin began when she was fourteen years old and picked up a free promotional copy of a Harlequin Romance book in a hometown grocery store. The relationship was solidified the year she was suspended from her high school typing class for hiding a Harlequin Romance novel behind the keys of her electric typewriter. Unaware that her instructor loomed close by, Ms. Quinn read blissfully on with one finger resting on the automatic repeating period key. She finished the book in the principal's office. Forced to leave her romances in her locker after that, Ms. Quinn's typing skills improved, a fact for which she is eternally grateful.

Though she wrote her first story at the age of seven, Ms. Quinn's professional writing career didn't begin until ten years later when she was hired as a stringer with the Dayton Daily News in Dayton, Ohio. Ms. Quinn was certified to teach high school English and published several magazine articles before turning to writing as a full-time occupation. She sits at her keyboard ten hours at a stretch these days-- typing romances.

Harlequin published Ms. Quinn's first book, Yesterday's Secrets in October, 1993. It received two Reviewers choice nominations, and was a finalist for the Romance Writers of America's RITA Award for Best Long Contemporary. Her succeeding novels have continued to garner recognition and awards. April of 2001 marked the release of Ms. Quinn's first single title novel, Sheltered in His Arms, and May 2001 saw her debut on the USA TODAY Bestseller List. Most recently her works have been featured on the Waldenbooks Bestseller List and achieved finalist status in the National Readers' Choice Award, Holt Medallion, Bookseller's Best Award, as well as the RITA Award.

With more than 40 original sales over twelve years, Ms. Quinn's books are found worldwide, with many foreign translations and more than four million copies sold. In addition to her novels, the prolific author has written two novellas; two in a continuity series and the launch book for another; and an Internet story. She has had one of her books released in Rocketbook format. October of 2000 marked the debut of the Shelter Valley Stories, a Tara Taylor Quinn series set in the fictional town of Shelter Valley, Arizona. The series has grown to nine books.

Ms. Quinn began writing for the MIRA imprint in 2003 and these emotionally gripping, character-driven stories are keeping readers on the edge of their seats. Her most recent MIRA novel, Hidden, was released in July 2005 and the next, In Plain Sight, is due for release in October 2006.

When she's not writing or fulfilling speaking engagements, Ms. Quinn enjoys traveling and spending time with her family and friends.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Friday, September 4, 1992

Dear James Winston Malone,

They gave me your name as someone who wanted to write to someone else who had a parent that was a rape victim. My name is Marybeth Lawson. I am twelve years old. My mother was raped and killed last March. I just started eighth grade this year. If you want, we can write.

Sincerely, Marybeth Lawson

Tuesday, September 8, 1992

Dear Marybeth Lawson,

I just turned thirteen last week. When will you be thirteen? I am in eighth grade, too. Writing's cool if that's what you want.

Later, James Malone

Saturday, September 12, 1992

Dear James,

I only want to write if you do. But if you do, I do, too.

Sincerely, Marybeth Lawson

P.S. I turn thirteen in January. I'm the youngest in my class because I started kindergarten early.

Tuesday, September 15, 1992

Dear Marybeth,

Okay, yeah, I want to. What classes are you taking? I have shop. I like it. I make things out of metal. Right now I'm working on a shelf for the bathroom wall for my mom's birthday. There's no medicine cabinet in there. We just moved and the place isn't all that great. I have art, too, and that's cool. English and the rest of that stuff I'm not so good at. I get okay grades, I just don't like 'em. Like who's ever going to need to know that that Shakespeare dude wrote about some guy who killed a king to be king and then had his wife commit suicide and then was beheaded? What kind of crap is that?

Sorry. You probably like that stuff.

Later, James

Friday, September 18, 1992

Dear James,

I can't believe you're reading Shakespeare, too! In our school it's only the advanced classes who get it in eighth grade. Ididn't much like Macbeth, either, but I loved Romeo and Juliet. They were almost our age. Not that that means anything. I wouldn't be in love if they paid me a million dollars. I just liked that they were such good friends that they would die for each other.

Someday I want to have a friend like that. (I can tell you that because you're just a piece of paper in another city and I'll never have to meet you or anything. That's what they said in counseling.) You're in counseling, too, right? So your mom lived? You're very lucky.

Write back soon, Marybeth Lawson

Thursday, September 24, 1992

Marybeth,

Yeah, I'm in counseling just like you, but I don't like it much. And yes, my mom is alive. It's just me and her. I have to watch out for her, 'cause I'm all she's got. But, in case you're wondering, I'm pretty good at watching out so if you ever need to say something, go ahead. I won't make nothing of it. I could kinda be your good friend from far away, if you want. If you think that's corny then just forget I said it. I'm sorry your mom died.

Write back if you want, James

Saturday, September 26, 1992.

Dear James,

I just got your letter. It's been over a week and I thought you weren't going to write back. I don't think what you said is corny at all. Why don't you like counseling? I think it's okay, it just doesn't seem to change anything. They say talking makes it better, but it doesn't. I don't want to talk about it. I just want to forget it. My dad quit already. He didn't like it, either. But he won't let me quit, yet. He's a great guy. I love him a lot. He can't help that he's so quiet and sad all the time now. I'm all he's got, too, and I try my best to take care of him. I've learned to cook some stuff pretty good, and I already knew how to clean. I ruined some of his white shirts in the wash but he didn't yell or anything. He just told me not to cry and went out and got more. He was always good that way. In the olden days he would've given me a hug, but we don't do that around here anymore. Does your mom? Sorry, you don't have to answer that if you don't want to.

School's okay. I was in cheerleading last year but dropped out this year. I'm doing gymnastics, though. I got my back handspring. I used to be too chicken, but I'm not anymore. My coach says that I could probably compete in high school if I want to. I don't know if I want to. My dad wouldn't have the time to come see meets anyway.

I like English. And math. Home ec is dumb. I already do all that stuff. But it's a required class to pass eighth grade so my dad said to just try to find something to like about it. I tried, but so far, nothing.

My dad's a manager of a company that makes computer parts. He golfs a lot. What does your mom do?

Write back soon, Marybeth

Tuesday, September 29, 1992

Marybeth,

I came home from school today all bummed out 'cause I didn't make the baseball team and it was cool to have your letter here. I didn't really want to play baseball anyway. I like basketball better. I played that in my old school. But we just moved here to Colorado and I missed basketball tryouts. My mom says maybe next year. Your address says Santa Barbara, California. I looked it up on a map and it looks like it's right on the ocean. That's cool. I'd like to live on the ocean. My mom said it's a little town, not all rough and stuff like Los Angeles is on TV. I hope so and that you can be safe there.

My mom's a teacher. This year she has third grade. It's pretty cool. She likes kids and they seem to dig her pretty much, for a teacher and all.

Well, gotta go. Keep writing. James Malone

P.S. Yeah, my mom hugs a lot—kinda too much but I don't really mind. I'd only ever tell you that, though, 'cause anyone else'd think I was a sissy or something. Sorry 'bout your dad.

P.S.S. If you want to talk about what happened to your mom, that's okay. Remember I'm just sorta a piece of paper.

Saturday, October 3, 1992

Dear James,

I'm sorry you didn't make the baseball team but I think baseball's boring. Guys just stand around while one or two throw and try to hit the ball and then there's a lot more standing around and stuff. Once in a while something exciting happens, like the time last month when that Brett guy from Kansas got his 3000th hit. They were playing my dad's team, the Angels, so I heard all the cheering. Anyway that kinda stuff only happens once in a while. My dad's really into sports. He watches them all the time now that Mom's gone. Mostly I hate them. Basketball's okay, though. It's fast.

No, I don't want to talk about my mom. I just want to forget. But it was nice of you to ask.

Santa Barbara's cool. I used to love it here. I wanted to move after what happened, but Dad couldn't because of his job and anyway, it wasn't like moving was going to make the memories go away. You got to, though, huh? That's cool. Sometimes I think life would be so much better if I were someplace where no one knew me or about what happened. I hate that kids at school sometimes look at me strange because they know. Like they feel sorry for me but no one talks to me. My dad says it's because they don't know what to say.

I used to have a best friend, Cara Williams, but she's hanging with some other kids now. I think I made her feel too weird 'cause I cried a lot in the beginning. I don't cry at all anymore. She still invites me to stuff, but I think it's 'cause her mother makes her. Anyway, she's still nice. I just don't want to be best friends anymore. I have to take care of my dad and do stuff here at home. And besides, all anyone ever tells me is, it's okay. It's going to be okay. And it's not, you know? It's not okay.

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound nasty or anything. I made sloppy joes for dinner tonight. My dad's golfing and there's no telling what time he'll be home and sloppy joes can sit on the stove till he gets here. My mom used to do stuff like that. Tonight I might babysit for the little girl next door. I do that sometimes while her parents play cards with their friends. They're home, but I'm fully in charge of Wendy. She's a year old and adorable. Plus they always have good snacks, like pizza rolls and I get paid. I'd do it even if I didn't, but I'm saving for a new bike.

Well, bye for now. Marybeth Lawson

Wednesday, October 7, 1992

Marybeth Lawson,

Don't think I'm weird or anything and maybe I shouldn't say this, but I'm glad we're writing. I hope you are, too. My mom asked about you today when she saw that your letter came. She said to say hi. Don't worry, she doesn't see your letters and I don't tell her what we say. She's cool, though. She doesn't ask, except about how you are.

We went to court today. They changed our names. My mom and everyone said to do it. It's kind of like you said, people won't always be knowing about the past this way and we can live our lives here with all the new people who never knew us before. But they didn't know me by my name anyway, 'cause my mom wasn't married to my dad yet when she had me and so my name was different from theirs. I just don't think it's all that cool. I mean, it's like I have to pretend now. Like the old me was too rotten to live. Maybe, like Mom says, I'll understand when I'm older. I guess it's cool that she and I have the same last name now, instead of me having her maiden name. But anyway, if it's okay with you, I still want to be James Winston Malone here. That's who I really am and now you will be the only one who knows him. Unless that's too weird, then we don't have to.

See ya, James Winston Malone

Saturday, October 10, 1992

Dear James Winston Malone,

Of course I'll call you James, still. It doesn't really matter what we call each other, does it? I guess you'll get your letters if I address them that way. If you don't, I hope you write and tell me who to write to. But if you don't, you won't even get this anyway so, oh, well, anyway, tell your mom I said hi back.

Hey, I know what, why don't you call me something else, too? Then, with you, I can just be any old girl, 'cause unlike you, I'd kind of like to not have to be me anymore. I'm so sick of all those looks.

Anyway, how 'bout if you call me Candy? I'll be Candy Lawson. 'Kay?

My friend Cara likes a boy in the ninth grade. She saw him at the JV football game last night. I think she's dumb. I don't want to start liking boys for a really long time.

Well, I gotta go. My dad's golfing and I'm going with the people next door, the Mathers, they're Wendy's parents, you know the little girl I babysit, anyway I'm going with them to see Batman Returns. It's at the dollar theater. Have you seen it? Cara saw it this summer and said it's really cool.

Write back soon, 'kay? Candy Lawson

Saturday, December 16, 2006

Dear Candy,

It's going to be a hard Christmas for both of us. Would that I could send a hug through a letter, my sweet friend, for you would surely have one now and anytime you opened an envelope from me.

Hard to believe that our parents both passed in the same year. And so young. I guess it's true that someone can die of a broken heart. I watched Mom slowly dwindle over the years, losing whatever zest she'd once had for life. It seemed as though she had the energy to see me raised, but once I left for college, she had no reason left to live.

Much like you say it was for your father.

In answer to your question, no, I won't be alone for Christmas. I was very glad to hear that you wouldn't be, as well. I picture you surrounded by people you care about.

I agree with what you said about heart—that it is the only true source that we can trust to guide us through life.

At the same time, the whole heart thing has me perplexed. If it's damaged by life's trials and tribulations, how much can we trust it? How much does it control us and how much can we control it?

Will I ever be able to open up and fully feel my heart, fully give it, or did the "incident" irrevocably change my ability to experience love on the deepest levels? Will I always be as I am now, moving through life without ever being fully engaged? Is there something I'm doing that keeps me trapped? Am I sabotaging myself? Or is this just the inevitable result to what happened when we were kids and a way of life for me that I can do nothing about—much like if I'd been in a skiing accident and lost a leg.

Tough questions. I look forward to your thoughts on this one.

In the meantime, know that I will be thinking about you through the season.

Yours, James

***

Marybeth?

Stuffing the letter she was reading into the writing desk drawer, Marybeth turned, smiling as a spry, little woman came through the kitchen into her living area, petting Brutus, two hundred and ten pounds of flesh and fur lounging in the doorway, as she passed.

"Hey! I didn't expect you until later." Jumping up, Marybeth stepped over the two-year-old mastiff and hugged Bonnie Mather, her surrogate mother from the time she was twelve.

"My garden club luncheon finished earlier than I thought— the speaker canceled."

"Well, come on in. The cookies are cooling, but I should be able to frost them if you want to wait." She'd told Bonnie she'd bake six dozen cookies to take to the soup kitchen.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)