The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse

The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse

3.9 14
by Robert Rankin
     
 

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A hilarious comic fantasy from the bestselling cult creator of the Brentford Triangle Trilogy

Once upon a time Jack set out to find his fortune in the big city. But the big city is Toy City, formerly known as Toy Town, and it has grown considerably since the good old days and isn't all that jolly any more. And there is a serial killer loose on the streets.

Overview

A hilarious comic fantasy from the bestselling cult creator of the Brentford Triangle Trilogy

Once upon a time Jack set out to find his fortune in the big city. But the big city is Toy City, formerly known as Toy Town, and it has grown considerably since the good old days and isn't all that jolly any more. And there is a serial killer loose on the streets. The old, rich nursery rhyme characters are being slaughtered one by one and the Toy City police are getting nowhere in their investigations. Meanwhile, Private Eye Bill Winkie has gone missing, leaving behind his sidekick Eddie Bear to take care of things.

Eddie may be a battered teddy with an identity crisis, but someone's got to stop the killer. When he teams up with Jack, the two are ready for the challenge. Not to mention the heavy drinking, bad behaviour, car chases, gratuitous sex and violence, toy fetishism and all-round grossness along the way. It's going to be an epic adventure!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Although the story is wickedly clever and the payoff is a great and satisfying surprise, the real delight comes from watching Rankin work his linguistic magic: characters talk in hilariously circular and self-aware dialogue, and puns and wordplay are packed into the prose like sardines in a tin."  —Publishers Weekly

"Rankin more than lives up to his deliriously inventive title."  —Entertainment Weekly

Publishers Weekly
Like a mad toymaker's fever dream, Rankin's uproarious book imagines a town where toys and nursery rhymes come to life and pursue human activities: they walk, talk, eat, drink and commit heinous crimes. Thirteen-year-old Jack goes to the City to find his fortune, unaware that the City is in fact Toy City, where legends and fables walk (or stumble, if they've had too much to drink). He meets up with detective teddy bear Eddie, who is investigating the murder of Humpty Dumpty. When Little Boy Blue is offed, it's clear that a serial killer is prowling Toy City, leaving behind the titular chocolate bunnies as his calling card. Rankin doesn't just drop names of familiar characters but gives them riotous back stories: Miss Muffett hosts a daytime TV talk show called "The Tuffet"; Mother Goose (who prefers to be called Madame Goose) runs a brothel; Humpty Dumpty was likely a failed television stuntman named Terry Horsey. Although the story is wickedly clever and the payoff is a great and satisfying surprise, the real delight comes from watching Rankin work his linguistic magic: characters talk in hilariously circular and self-aware dialogue, and puns and wordplay are packed into the prose like sardines in a tin. Although substantially darker and edgier than the Hitchhiker's series, this gem will appeal to Douglas Adams fans, as well as lovers of British humor in general. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780575085435
Publisher:
Gollancz, Victor Limited
Publication date:
06/01/2010
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Robert Rankin is an unrepentant Luddite who writes his bestselling novels by hand in exercise books. He lives with his wife in Brighton.

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The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
easyreader50SV More than 1 year ago
LOL!! Beyond the nursery characters and live toys is the philosophy and religeous commentaries woven arround the delightful detective story.Full of alliteration, puns, innuendo, and clever concepts this unusual story left me wanting more. The Toyminator? I'm all over it.
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Rioghan_Celt More than 1 year ago
This is the perfect book for parents that are bored stiff reading nursery rhymes to their kids. Definitely not a book to be read to the kids though! In search of a life in the city, Jack falls into a world where the high society consists of Nursery Rhyme characters. And Jack finds himself investigating their murders with an alcoholic teddy bear named Eddie Bear. This book puts a criminal spin on all the characters you know from your childhood! I have to say that this is the funniest book that I've ever read!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
No, not realy. While it does have it's moments, if you like long winded british humor, it does tend to drag on at the end. If you only manage to read the first third of the book consider it time well spent. Anything after that is filler. While the writing is not going to win any awards, the story is well thought out and even though you could get by with the first part of the story, I didn't feel cheated by finishing it up. Anyway, I have read all of Douglas Adams' books and all of Pratchetts' that interested me. If you haven't read them I would try those out first and if you really like them, then this is for you. Just don't expect greatness, do expect some chuckles and light entertainment.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not only was this story hilarious, but it had a great plot. The characters were lovable and there were too many one-liners to count. This book is something to be admired. I LOVED IT.