Hollywood is like High School with Money

( 21 )

Overview

Twenty-four-year old Taylor Henning has just landed her dream job as an assistant at a major movie studio. But when her catty coworkers trick her into almost getting fired, she realizes that the old saying "Hollywood is like school with money" just may be true. The thing is, Taylor wasn't exactly a social butterfly in high school-how is she supposed to do any better the second time around?

That's when she meets her boss's popular sixteen-year-old daughter Quinn, and has an ...

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Hollywood is like High School with Money

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Overview

Twenty-four-year old Taylor Henning has just landed her dream job as an assistant at a major movie studio. But when her catty coworkers trick her into almost getting fired, she realizes that the old saying "Hollywood is like school with money" just may be true. The thing is, Taylor wasn't exactly a social butterfly in high school-how is she supposed to do any better the second time around?

That's when she meets her boss's popular sixteen-year-old daughter Quinn, and has an epiphany: maybe this teenager can teach her how to use her queen bee tactics to succeed in the Hollywood popularity contest. Quinn comes up with a plan to teach Taylor one lesson a week-everything from "Fake it 'til you make it" to "It's *never* your fault"—and soon Taylor finds herself winning the war against rival assistant Kylie. Until, that is, she's directed to steal Kylie's boyfriend, and something happens that's not in the game plan: Taylor falls for the guy. Now she must do the impossible— harness her inner mean girl while staying true to herself.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Daily News
"Great fun."
Philadelphia Examiner
"The New York Times bestselling author of The A-List series entertains with the tale of a 24-year-old second assistant (yes, an assistant to an assistant) in the movie industry who learns how to fake it 'til she makes it in Hollywood...all under the tutelage of the 16-year-old daughter of her boss. Definite guilty pleasure with plenty of US Weekly-esque references to celebrity culture and designer name dropping."
Booklist
"A fun and frothy summer read for anyone with an interest in the behind-the-scenes workings of Hollywood."
Romantic Times Book Reviews
"Dean knows her way around plotting and a good literary scandal (or two). Paralying that ability into the chick lit genre, she succeeds in telling a Mean Girls story. . . a lot of fun."
From the Publisher
"Great fun."—New York Daily News

"The New York Times bestselling author of The A-List series entertains with the tale of a 24-year-old second assistant (yes, an assistant to an assistant) in the movie industry who learns how to fake it 'til she makes it in Hollywood...all under the tutelage of the 16-year-old daughter of her boss. Definite guilty pleasure with plenty of US Weekly-esque references to celebrity culture and designer name dropping."—Philadelphia Examiner

"A fun and frothy summer read for anyone with an interest in the behind-the-scenes workings of Hollywood."—Booklist

"Dean knows her way around plotting and a good literary scandal (or two). Paralying that ability into the chick lit genre, she succeeds in telling a Mean Girls story. . . a lot of fun."—Romantic Times Book Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Dean delivers another pop artifact in her latest riff on the Gossip Girl generation, this time dressing up the goings-on with a very Devil Wears Prada vibe. Landing a job as second assistant to Iris Whitaker, a Metronome Studios hotshot, sounds like a dream come true for Ohio native Taylor Henning, who naturally wants to make it big in Hollywood. But this fish out of water needs to learn quickly how to swim with the sharks, as Iris's first assistant, Kylie Arthur, would prefer she drowns. Thankfully, a fairy godmother appears in the fierce form of Quinn, Iris's 16-year-old daughter, who suggests Taylor follow her surefire high school rules: fake it till you make it; speak up in class; make one cool friend; and realize lunch is a battleground. But there are unforeseen consequences for Taylor, who remembers some age-old advice just in time. It's a slick little novel: catty, glitzy and just mean enough. (July)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446697194
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/23/2009
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Hollywood is Like High School with Money is based in part on Zoey Dean's experiences as an assistant in Hollywood after college. She now divides her time between Los Angeles and New York City, her constant companion her shih tzu, Miss Vivien. (Named after Vivien Leigh-who doesn't love Gone with the Wind?) She is currently at work on her next novel.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2014

    Kacyboo<3

    I love this book thnx to the author for writing it I enjoyed it to the very last word:-))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    Ms.Jackie

    Have some choclate shhhh dont tell yu can leave early

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    Comic, heartwarming

    This is a cute, fast-paced read about a girl who loses her way on her climb to the top. The writing is sharp and funny, and the feel-good ending hits just the right note.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2011

    A

    The series on youtube was great.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Quick Reading

    Taylor gets her dream job, but its at the bottom of the pile in the hamper known as Hollywood. But this is a quirky, fun book where the heroine gets help from her boss's teenage daughter(who has her own reasons for helping) and along the way Taylor gets to move out of the bottom, but along the way, she has to be sure she dosent burn any bridges she might need to cross again later. I thought it was great and alot like Privleged(which means it could be an awesome show or movie).

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  • Posted July 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Funny and Quirky

    "Hollywood is Like High School with Money" by Zoey Dean is a charming story about trying to break into the film business and staying there without getting stabbed in the back. Again, another story about Hollywood I had to read; but this time from the viewpoint of an assistant (the lowest of the lowest in that world). This one is funny and quirky and an easy read. Certainly, a good book to escape to the beach with!

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  • Posted July 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Fun, satisfying summer read - this would be a wonderful movie!

    Synopsis:

    Taylor Henning started her dream job at a major Hollywood studio. For as long as she can remember, Taylor has loved movies. The reclusive director Michael Deming and his seminal work Journal Girl have been a particular inspiration for Taylor. Although she's never received a response, Taylor sends Deming updates on her Hollywood experience.

    Taylor soon finds that life as a second assistant involves small tasks and not the selection and producing of "great films," at least to start. But more than the type of work, it's her co-workers that make Taylor miserable. It's like high school all over with the popular girls and their mean tricks. Taylor's too much of a nice girl to acclimatize. Outwitted one too many times by first assistant Kylie and with her job at risk, Taylor asks Quinn, her boss's popular teenage daughter, for tactical advice. It's not about being mean. It's about being confident. Not taking anyone's @#%$...Fake it till you make it...Speak up in class. When you're quiet, you're invisible...Make 1 cool friend...Lunch is a battleground...Enlist a faithful assistant. Taking Quinn's advice, Taylor wins victories against Kylie.

    As Taylor starts to come into her own, a creative executive position opens up. Competing against Kylie and the other assistants for the promotion, Taylor proves willing to use darker methods to advance.

    Review:

    Hollywood is Like High School With Money is the first Zoey Dean novel that I've read. Though the plot seems straightforward and predictable, Zoey Dean sets up the conflicts wonderfully. It may be that I'm inured to violence and too sensitive to female bullying, but when I got to where Kylie was setting the first trap for Taylor, I found the tension unbearable. I had to pause, put the book down, and come back to it. After that break from the book, I couldn't put it down. When Taylor seemed naive and too trusting, Dean gave her enough wit to make her likable. As Taylor grew accustomed to manipulation and was veering to the dark side, I still cared about her.

    Overall, Hollywood is Like High School With Money is a light, satisfying read. I highly recommend it as a fun escape.

    Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (July 23, 2009), 288 pages.

    Courtesy of Hatchette Books Group.

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  • Posted July 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    FUN, LIGHT READING

    HOLLYWOOD IS LIKE HIGH SCHOOL
    WITH MONEY
    Zoey Dean
    Grand Central Publishing
    $13.99 - Paperback
    ISBN: 978-0-446-69719-2
    288 Pages
    Reviewer: Annie Slessman

    Taylor Henning is headed for Hollywood to work at Metronome where she hopes to find great manuscripts that she can make into hit movies. Starting as the second assistant to Iris Whitaker, President of Production at Metronome, she finds herself in competition with Iris's first assistant, Kylie. Kylie is street smart and knows how to work the system to get what she wants. She treats Taylor as an irritation she has to contend with and intimidates Taylor at the get go.

    Taylor soon realizes she hasn't the know-how to compete with Kylie and enlists the help of Iris's teen daughter, Quinn. Quinn is a with-it teen who manages to get what she wants in life and leads Taylor on a journey that takes her to unexpected places.

    Just when Taylor thinks she has it made, Iris discovers she has partnered with Quinn. When Taylor makes a big mistake at work, she finds herself struggling for composure as Iris reads her the riot act. At that point in the story she finds herself in jeopardy of losing her job, her new found boyfriend and the only true friend she has in Los Angeles.

    The ending of the story is a surprising one that will satisfy readers. This is not the great masterpiece. However, it is fun, light reading that fills in a dreary, rainy afternoon.

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  • Posted July 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A quick fun read

    Fresh from Connecticut, Taylor Henning lands a dream job at a major movie studio. Okay, so she's not a Creative Executive whose job it is to read and recommend screenplays for the studios to produce. No. she's just an assistant to the assistant of the powerful Iris Whitaker, President of Production.

    When first assistant Kylie Arthur sabotages Taylor at the first opportunity she almost gets fired. That's when Taylor realizes that Hollywood is just like high school. If you're not in, no one wants to be your friend.

    In order for Taylor to survive in this environment she enlists the help of Iris' sixteen year old daughter Quinn. Irritated to no end Quinn nevertheless takes on the challenge and begins texting Taylor "rules" to get ahead in the cut throat world of the movie business and amazingly enough her tips are working! That is until Quinn's next rule is to steal Kylie's boyfriend. Torn between doing the right thing and securing her real dream job Taylor has some tough decisions to make.

    I LOVE, LOVE, LOVED this book!! It was so much fun. Yes it did remind me a lot of The Devil Wears Prada but Taylor became a cherished character and I very much wanted her to succeed. I even loved the snarky Quinn. She was a spoiled brat but she had a good heart and I was rooting for her too. This is a fun breezy read that I recommend to all chick lit lovers.

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  • Posted July 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    great novel

    Quick, fun to read novel. I was laughing out a few times when I read this book. This is a good beach read. I am looking forward to read more from this author.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Quick fun read

    Taylor Henning is about to fulfill her dreams of making it in the movie business. Inspired by his movie Journal Girl to pursue film, she's been writing to the reclusive director of the movie for 7 years about her life and receiving nothing back in return but that doesn't stop her. She's landed the job as second assistant to a creative exec at a studio, and is determined to succeed. What she doesn't realize is the atmosphere is permeated with cattiness and assistants willing to set others up for termination. Taylor's never been popular, but she's never been unpopular either. She was categorically the "nice girl" in school, getting along with everyone. After being set up to be fired after only her first week, Taylor realizes she needs help to play the game. So she enlists Iris' daughter Quinn, the head of the popular girls in her elite school, to help make her over. Quinn agrees with the stipulation that she may call on a favor anytime.

    Quinn's lessons involve faking it 'til you make it, never accepting blame, and stealing first assistant Kylie's (she of the firing attempts) boyfriend Luke. What she doesn't anticipate is falling for Luke. When a really good script falls into Taylor's lap, she sees an opportunity for promotion all of the assistants are vying for, and leaps in without thinking it all through. What she doesn't realize is for as much as she loathes Kylie's mean girl attitude, Taylor's slipped into her shoes pretty easily.

    This was a really cute novel. Quick, easy, fun to read. Again, even during the periods of Taylor becoming more Hollywood and cocky, you really root for Taylor to succeed as Taylor. The story arc with Taylor and Michael, the director of Journal Girl, is interesting, as is the storyline with the first-time screenwriter who is so eager to get notes for her script and make something good.
    The story dragged me in more than expected too. I really wondered if Taylor had burned all her bridges, work, love, and friendship wise and was pleasantly surprised at the ending, even though I should have anticipated it. I really enjoy Zoey Dean, and I loved the show Privileged which was based on her novel How to Teach Filthy Rich Girls. I look forward to much more from her!

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  • Posted April 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    lol

    I love all books by Zoey dean and I have a feeling this one will be awesome tooo

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    Posted March 15, 2011

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    Posted July 3, 2011

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    Posted December 24, 2010

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    Posted October 1, 2009

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