Hollywood's Chosen People: The Jewish Experience in American Cinema

Overview

As studio bosses, directors, and actors, Jews have been heavily involved in film history and vitally involved in all aspects of film production. Yet Jewish characters have been represented onscreen in stereotypical and disturbing ways, while Jews have also helped to produce some of the most troubling stereotypes of people of color in Hollywood film history. In Hollywood's Chosen People: The Jewish Experience in American Cinema, leading scholars consider the complex relationship between Jews and the film industry,...

See more details below
Paperback
$31.95
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $33.39   
  • New (3) from $33.39   
  • Used (3) from $61.60   
Sending request ...

Overview

As studio bosses, directors, and actors, Jews have been heavily involved in film history and vitally involved in all aspects of film production. Yet Jewish characters have been represented onscreen in stereotypical and disturbing ways, while Jews have also helped to produce some of the most troubling stereotypes of people of color in Hollywood film history. In Hollywood's Chosen People: The Jewish Experience in American Cinema, leading scholars consider the complex relationship between Jews and the film industry, as Jews have helped to construct Hollywood's vision of the American dream and American collective identity and have in turn been shaped by those representations.

Editors Daniel Bernardi, Murray Pomerance, and Hava Tirosh-Samuelson introduce the volume with an overview of the history of Jews in American popular culture and the American film industry. Multidisciplinary contributors go on to discuss topics such as early Jewish films and directors, institutionalized anti-Semitism, Jewish identity and gossip culture, and issues of Jewish performance on film. Contributors draw on a diverse sampling of films, from representations of the Holocaust on film to screen comedy; filmmakers and writers, including David Mamet, George Cukor, Sidney Lumet, Edward Sloman, and Steven Spielberg; and stars, like Barbra Streisand, Adam Sandler, and Ben Stiller.

The Jewish experience in American cinema reveals much about the degree to which Jews have been integrated into and contribute to the making of American popular film culture. Scholars of Jewish studies, film studies, American history, and American culture as well as anyone interested in film history will find this volume fascinating reading.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Daniel Bernardi is professor and chair at the Department of Cinema of San Francisco State University. He is the author of Star Trek and History: Race-ing toward a White Future and co-author of Narrative Landmines: Rumors, Islam Extremism, and the Struggle for Strategic Influence.

Murray Pomerance is a Canadian film scholar, author, and professor who teaches in the Department of Sociology at Ryerson University and in the joint program in communication and culture at Ryerson University and York University. He has written extensively on film, cinematic experience, and performance. Most recently he authored Michelangelo Red Antonioni Blue: Eight Reflections on Cinema and Edith Valmaine. Pomerance is the editor and co-editor of a dozen books and the editor of several book series on film at Rutgers University Press and at the State University of New York Press.

Hava Tirosh-Samuelson is professor of history, director of Jewish studies, and Irving and Miriam Lowe Chair of Modern Judaism at Arizona State University. She specializes in Jewish intellectual history, Judaism and science, and Judaism and ecology. In addition to numerous essays and book chapters, she is the author of the award-winning Between Worlds: The Life and Thought of Rabbi David ben Judah Messer Leon and Happiness in Premodern Judaism: Virtue, Knowledge and Well-Being and is the editor of five books.

Contributors: Daniel Bernardi, Vincent Brook, Wheeler Winston Dixon, Lucy Fischer, Lester D. Friedman, Sumiko Higashi, Sarah Kozloff, Peter Krämer, Murray Pomerance, Catherine Portuges, William Rothman, Vivian Sobchack, David Sterritt, Hava Tirosh-Samuelson

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction: The Hollywood Question Hava Tirosh-Samuelson Daniel Bernardi Murray Pomerance 1

A Forgotten Masterpiece: Edward Sloman's His People Lester D. Friedman 19

Jewish Immigrant Directors and Their Impact on Hollywood Catherine Portuges 35

"A Rotten Bunch of Vile People with No Respect for Anything Beyond the Making of Money": Joseph Breen, the Hollywood Production Code, and Institutionalized Anti-Semitism in Hollywood Wheeler Winston Dixon 53

Stardom, Intermarriage, and Consumption in the 1950s: The Debbie-Eddie-Liz Scandal Sumiko Higashi 73

Hats off for George Cukor! William Rothman 91

Notes on Sontag and "Jewish Moral Seriousness" in American Movies Sarah Kozloff 111

The Good German?: Oskar Schindler and the Movies, 1951-1993 Peter Kraämer 125

Representing Atrocity: September 11 through the Holocaust Lens David Sterritt 141

David Mamet's Homicide: In or Out? Lucy Fischer 159

Boy-Man Schlemiels and Super-Nebishes: Adam Sandler and Ben Stiller Vincent Brook 173

Who Was Buddy Love?: Screen Performance and Jewish Experience Murray Pomerance 193

Assimilating Streisand: When Too Much Is Not Enough Vivian Sobchack 211

Works Cited 229

Contributors 245

Index 251

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)