Holman Bible Atlas: A Complete Guide to the Expansive Geography of Biblical History

Holman Bible Atlas: A Complete Guide to the Expansive Geography of Biblical History

4.8 6
by Thomas V. Brisco
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1558197095

ISBN-13: 9781558197091

Pub. Date: 01/01/1999

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group


The Holman Bible Atlas offers a visual feast through which the reader can explore the world of the Bible. Utilizing 140 full color maps key to biblical events and 140 full color photographs illustrating the land, sites, and archaeology of the biblical world, the Atlas draws the reader into the biblical story.The Holman Bible Atlas begins with an introduction to

Overview


The Holman Bible Atlas offers a visual feast through which the reader can explore the world of the Bible. Utilizing 140 full color maps key to biblical events and 140 full color photographs illustrating the land, sites, and archaeology of the biblical world, the Atlas draws the reader into the biblical story.The Holman Bible Atlas begins with an introduction to the geography of the biblical world emphasizing the major physical features of the Ancient Near East with special attention given to the geographical regions of Palestine. Information about daily life and the role of archaeology in recovering ancient cultures are discussed.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558197091
Publisher:
B&H Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/01/1999
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
8.81(w) x 11.31(h) x 0.82(d)

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Holman Bible Atlas: A Complete Guide to the Expansive Geography of Biblical History 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I did some research before buying a good Bible atlas, and this one consistantly floated to the top of the pile. I purchased it, and after reading it I can say that without a doubt it has done far more to further my understanding of the Bible than any other book. Fantastic maps and pictures, but so much more. It is as much a concise history of the Near East as it is an atlas. It is presented chronologically, from pre-history through AD 135, and does a wonderful job of walking you through the political, ecomonic, religious and cultural highlights of each era. I bought it as a reference, but read it cover to cover. A prized reference and a must buy for serious bible study.
Olivetreeann More than 1 year ago
I was introduced to the Holman Bible Atlas as a student and am now using it as a teacher. The maps are arranged in chronological order following the order of the books of the Bible. Geography, history, local background and culture and biographical information along with color pictures, charts and additional essays enhance the text explaining each significant segment in Biblical and world history all in language which is easy to read and understand. Maps are both topographical and geographical, and are easy to read with keys and Biblical references. An interesting feature is the timeline that runs continuously across the top of each page throughout the book helping you to correlate the map and its time period with the people of the Bible. This book is an excellent reference book for the home, school libraries and the classroom. The essays are great for additional reading to suppliment Bible curriculum. This book is also a great asset for personal Bible study since it follows the Bible in its layout and chronological order. It will help you to understand the lands of the Bible and the role geography plays in the world of Biblical people. Its a wonderful tool for underscoring the fact that the Bible is about real people in real places.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An excellent quick atlas reference for any student of the Word.
HomeSchoolBookReview 8 months ago
When I enrolled in Florida College at Temple Terrace, FL, in 1972, our first year required Bible History and Geography class (“Freshman Bible”) used the Baker’s Bible Atlas by Charles F. Pfeiffer as our textbook. Fast forward some forty years, and when our son Jeremy enrolled at F. C. in 2014, that same required class used the Holman Bible Atlas by Thomas V. Brisco, who is Provost, Chief Academic Officer, and Professor of Old Testament and Archaeology at Hardin-Simmons University. He formerly served at Baylor University where he taught in the Department of Religion. Prior to that, he taught for 21 years at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he was also the Associate Dean for the Doctor of Philosophy Program. Dr. Brisco specializes in ancient near eastern history and archaeology particularly as these subjects relate to the historical, cultural, and geographical setting of the Bible. His archaeological field experience includes work at Tel Aphek and Tel Batash in Israel. Jeremy’s class used the original 1998 edition, but a newer version was published in 2014. The 21 chapters of Holman Bible Atlas, which won the ECPA Gold Medallion Book Award and is considered the leading Bible atlas of today in the English language, are divided into three main parts. Part I (Chapters 1-3) details the physical geography of the Ancient Near East. Part II (Chapters 4-14) covers the Old Testament history from the beginning to the Hellenistic period. And Part III (Chapters 15-21) discusses the New Testament era from the rise of Rome to around A. D. 300. The use of 132 full-color maps, more than 100 color photographs, timelines, chart summaries, and helpful sidebars places readers in the geographical, historical, and cultural contexts of the Bible, enabling them to see the key events of the Bible and Christianity with exceptional clarity and to experience its perennially relevant message. There is a wealth of written and visual information regarding various people groups (Aramaeans, Moabites, Phoenicians, etc.), great empires (Egypt, Babylonia, Rome, etc.), and the economic life of ancient civilizations based on archaeological recoveries. Here are just a few notes garnered from my browsing through the book. The author apparently accepts the view that the history of the Bible should be taken back to the “Paleolithic (Old Stone Age)” period that supposedly goes beyond 18,000 B.C., apparently to fit it in with human devised dating schemes. Also, he expresses (pretty much as fact) the view that Sheshbazzar and Zerubbabel were two different people, calling Zarubbabel a “nephew of Sheshbazzar,” as opposed to the idea which we were always taught that these were just two different names, one Persian and the other Aramaic, for the same person. Of course, there always have been and ever will be differences of opinion among Bible scholars regarding many somewhat unclear details of Bible history. There is an index for reference, but, unfortunately, none of t he pages in the text are numbered. Personally, I happen to prefer the Baker’s Bible Atlas (it has been updated), primarily because it is more what I am used to, but also because I think that it is a little more conservative. But the Holman Bible Atlas is still a good reference.
TonyRiv More than 1 year ago
If you really desire to understanding the biblical settings of how GOD dealt with His first chosen people- the Hebrews- then this book is the one to read upon. Without a doubt, BIBLE ATLAS has to offer more than just maps and illustrations on biblical perspective, but it gives you a rich background of historical information that produces pure fascination of how, where, and why it is important to understand the Holy Scriptures.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago