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Holmes Sweet Holmes
     

Holmes Sweet Holmes

3.0 1
by Dan Andriacco
 

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Writer-actor-director Peter Gerard's latest film was a smash hit, but some fans of Sherlock Holmes were outraged. Why? Because 221 B Bourbon Street portrayed the beloved detective as a goateed, saxophone-playing southern American working in 1920s New Orleans!

Was it a disgruntled Sherlockian or someone else who hated Gerard enough to kill him - twice? That's what

Overview

Writer-actor-director Peter Gerard's latest film was a smash hit, but some fans of Sherlock Holmes were outraged. Why? Because 221 B Bourbon Street portrayed the beloved detective as a goateed, saxophone-playing southern American working in 1920s New Orleans!

Was it a disgruntled Sherlockian or someone else who hated Gerard enough to kill him - twice? That's what mystery writer and college professor Sebastian McCabe, assisted by brother-in-law Jeff Cody, must find out before McCabe's own disgraceful involvement in the affair comes to light. And it will take a little stage magic to do it.

Amidst this challenging mystery, Jeff's complicated relationship with the lovely journalist Lynda Teal seems to be reaching a definitive resolution just as Jeff approaches his birthday.

Readers who so enjoyed the best-selling No Police Like Holmes will find this sequel packed with the same suspense, surprises, and sharp humor that characterized the debut adventure of Sebastian McCabe and Jeff Cody.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780921402
Publisher:
MX Publishing
Publication date:
05/01/2012
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.57(d)

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Holmes Sweet Holmes 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Philip_K_Jones More than 1 year ago
This book is the second Sebastian McCabe – Jeff Cody mystery, following his earlier "No Police Like Holmes." This book lacks the impressive character set of eccentric Sherlockians encountered in the first, but it does present a dandy mystery and a new set of eccentrics. This group are a bit more difficult to categorize, but they tend to come from the world of entertainment, if anywhere in particular. Much of the narrative concentrates on academic in-fighting, with our heroes "in medias res." We are treated to a double murder with theories obscured by facts and suspects just oozing both motives and lies. Telling the white hats from the black takes more than an eye for color. Our hero, Jeff Cody, worries his way through the entire process and professor McCabe claims to have every thing almost in hand for most of the book. Personally, I miss the rich Sherlockian atmosphere of the earlier book, but the author did come up with at least one good line from "The Maltese Falcon" as well as few other mystery references. Jeff’s true love, reporter Lynda Teal, turns out to have an educated taste in Bourbon but the chief of police seems to be a “throw ‘em back” fisherman. The femme fatale of this little opus seems to have an uneducated taste for whatever or whoever is offered. The battle between Jeff and his boss, Ralph, moves into new territory and the seamy side of the ivory tower gets exposed for all to see. This is a worthy second volume and it continues the tradition of crimes in an academic setting. The setting, a small town on the Ohio River, with a small private University and a semi-rural population continues to provide enough contrasts to maintain interest. Large cities are close enough to hand to add contrast to the mix and the faculty and student bodies offer a wide selection of characters for manipulation. Reviewed by: Philip K. Jones, June 2012