The Holocaust Is Over; We Must Rise From its Ashes

( 9 )

Overview

Modern day Israel, and the Jewish community, is strongly influenced by the memory and horrors of Hitler and the Holocaust. Burg argues that the Jewish nation has been traumatized and has lost the ability to trust itself, its neighbors or the world around it. He shows that this is one of the causes for the growing nationalism and violence that are plaguing Israeli society and reverberating through Jewish communities worldwide. Burg uses his own family history—his parents were Holocaust survivors—to inform his ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (50) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $6.69   
  • Used (38) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Modern day Israel, and the Jewish community, is strongly influenced by the memory and horrors of Hitler and the Holocaust. Burg argues that the Jewish nation has been traumatized and has lost the ability to trust itself, its neighbors or the world around it. He shows that this is one of the causes for the growing nationalism and violence that are plaguing Israeli society and reverberating through Jewish communities worldwide. Burg uses his own family history—his parents were Holocaust survivors—to inform his innovative views on what the Jewish people need to do to move on and eventually live in peace with their Arab neighbors and feel comfortable in world at large. Thought-provoking, compelling, and original, this book is bound to spark a heated debate around the world.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This is an important book by a very courageous man. The shadow of the Shoah and its abusive application to the contemporary Middle East have been a catastrophe for Jews, Israelis and Arabs alike. In Burg's view Israel must move beyond Hitler's poisoned legacy. If they cannot or will not do this, the Middle East will never see peace and Israel has no future.” — Tony Judt, bestselling author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 and Professor at New York University

“An Israeli-born son of Holocaust survivors, Burg addresses a heartfelt plea to his countrymen: remember the past, but do not be its slaves; pathology is neither patriotism nor statescraft.  A compelling and eloquent cri de coeur from a veteran of Israel's wars and politics.” — Howard M. Sachar, bestselling author of A History of the Jews in the Modern World and A History of Israel

"Burg takes a blunt, loving, painful and desperately important look at the state of the Jewish soul today. Anyone who cares about the future of the Middle East and the fate of victimized peoples needs to read this book and think hard." — J.J. Goldberg, author of Jewish Power: Inside the American Jewish Establishment and Editorial Director of The Forward

“This fascinating and thought-provoking book should be read by every person who cares about Israel. Burg's central theme is that Israeli leaders use the memory of the Holocaust in ways that are warping the country's soul, creating unnecessary fear, and making it impossible to achieve peace with the Palestinians.” — John J. Mearsheimer, bestselling author of The Israel Lobby and US Foreign Policy and Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago 

"[An] assured and provocative polemic. . . . [A] lecture with much wisdom . . . worthy of global consideration." — Kirkus Reviews

“An honest reflection of a tormented man searching for the universal values in Judaism.” — Le Figaro

“In this book of memories and reflections, the former Knesset Speaker delivers his disquieting findings about Israel that 'became a Kingdom without a prophesy.'... Foremost a book of hope from a man who wants to find ways to return Judaism to its universal calling.” —Le Monde

“Short of being Prime Minister, Burg could not be higher in the Zionist establishment.” David Remnick, The New Yorker

 

"Mr. Burg...wrote a powerful book, an indictment of how Zionism and the Holocaust have been used."—Globe and Mail

 

"Avraham Burg has great faith in the creative power of argument.  His book has already provoked much controversy and now that it has been translated is certain to provoke more.  At a time when crass, catchpenny titles pour from the presses, it is that unusual thing: A new book that matters."  —Neil Berry, Arab News

Kirkus Reviews
An activist Israeli politician challenges his native country to be more than just the progeny of the Shoah and to chart a renewed course as a light unto the nations-to be an Israel in which Hitler's ghost is finally exorcised. In his assured and provocative polemic, Burg sees obsession with The Six Million as a burden. Genocide is a human crime not confined to Nazism, he reminds us. The Holocaust may represent civilization's nadir, but it must no longer be the sole event in Jewish collective memory that dictates policy, education, private anxiety or public discourse. Selectively reviewing history, the author notes that the Yishuv, the settlement that became Israel, was not overly concerned with the Jews of Europe before World War II ended. Participants in the Warsaw uprising are humanity's heroes, he states, not just those of Zionism. Burg sees a hubristic turning point for Israel during the 1960s in both the Six-Day War and the trial of Adolf Eichmann, whom he maintains should have been indicted and tried by an international tribunal. Supplied in that connection are minutes of a cabinet meeting attended by the author's father, at that time a member of the Knesset. (The author served as that organization's speaker from 1999 to 2003.) "Israel must leave Auschwitz," Burg writes, "because Auschwitz is a mental prison." Now, with the Middle East still embroiled in a contest of violence, he proposes that the Law of Return, which maintains Israel as the Jewish state, be reconsidered. It is time, he asserts, to establish a "World Religion Organization," part of his audacious prescription for utopia in the Holy Land and across the world. Many of Burg's co-religionists will view this highlyimprobable fix with alarm. A sharp, appropriately tendentious lecture with much wisdom, a bestseller in Israel and worthy of global consideration.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780230607521
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2008
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 1,241,132
  • Product dimensions: 6.46 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

Avraham Burg is the former Speaker of the Knesset in Israel (1999-2003). He has been active in politics as a leader in the Labor Party and the One Israel party. His article in The Guardian called "The End of Zionism" was widely read and debated. He lives with his wife in Nataf, a small village outside Jerusalem.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    AshClaw

    Padded in.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2014

    Vapour

    Took one last look around before padding to camp with his vole

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    Stellarwind to snowy and below

    IMPOSTER!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2014

    Stellarwind

    "I....dont want yo be flarestrikes mate abymore."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2014

    Snowyheart

    Yes?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2014

    Flameheart

    Ok

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 16, 2009

    A Tour de Force!

    'The Holocaust is Over; We Must Rise From its Ashes' is an outstanding book. Avraham Burg loves Israel passionately and completely. Its this love of country that inspired his fearless examination of present day Israel. He offers an opposing view that is sorely needed and badly lacking in Israeli politics today.

    The controversy generated by this book demonstrates a side of Israel I, for one, hope to see more of: the open Israel where freedom of expression allows for lively discussions without banishing the voice of dissent. Its a beautiful thing and that's just one of countless reasons why this book is so tremendous.

    Whatever side of the fence you're on, its hard not to be moved by Burg's brave vision for peace, by his proposal for a revolution of the national consciousness. I came away fairly certain that Avraham Burg has more Chuzpah in his little finger than the rest of the Knesset combined.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2008

    Lament of a fickle

    The book ¿The Holocaust is over; We must raise from its ashes¿ by Avraham Burg, the former Chairman of the Jewish Agency and former Speaker of the Knesset came as a surprise to many Israelis. A former paratrooper officer, a Talmudic scholar and a longtime ¿peacenik¿, he lost several years ago the bid for leadership of the Labor party. Disappointed and angry, Burg fled to France (his wife is a French citizen) where in an interview to the TV channel France 24 he declared the ¿end of the Jewish State¿ and called on Israelis to take out foreign passports and leave their country. He than reappeared in Israel to start a business and to write this book full of Eurocentristic condemnations and recommendations for the Israeli society. <BR/> It often feels like the Israeli public figures compete with each other in verbal abuse of their fellow citizens. Avraham Burg placed himself high on the scolders list. He complains that the Shoah (Holocaust) legacy is cynically exploited to justify the alleged belligerence of Israeli politics. He claims that the Shoah studies in Israeli high-schools promote the feelings of victim-hood and ¿the world against us¿ mindset of young Israelis. Burg¿s complaints are unfair because, while the Shoah is not forgotten in Israel, it did not become one of the facets of Israeli identity. Even the older generation does not live by memory of Shoah anymore, if they ever did. Israeli identity, like that of any other people, might have faults, but the complex of victim-hood is not one of them. The memory of Shoah serves Israelis a lesson of what might happen to people without a land of their own, forced to live among other nations. <BR/> Burg scolds Israelis for failing to match up to the pacifist ideals that the Israeli ¿peaceniks¿ dreamt up for them. His pacifism takes a bizarre turn when, referring to the uprising in the Byalostock ghetto, Burg writes: ¿As for myself, if I lived in a ghetto today, I am not certain that I would resort to arms. I would ask myself until my last moment on earth whether rebelling is like lightning a flame to gods of war; once lit, the flames might go out of control and destroy everybody¿. There is scarce mentioning of the enormous external and internal pressures Israeli society is subjected to by terrorist attacks and propaganda war against Israel. Nevertheless, despite being a society under siege, the Israelis did not develop a xenophobic outlook. ¿The whole world against us¿ mindset exists only as a butt of Israeli jokes. <BR/> The Eurocentristic tenor of the book is difficult to miss. Himself of partly European parentage, Burg is praising the passivity (or non-belligerence) of the German Jewish Reform movement failing to recognize that passivity was among the reasons for demise of German Jewry. He idealizes the contemporary European society attributing to it a Universalist mindset and pacifist politics. Seeing, apparently, himself European, Burg is unhappy about the Levantine attitudes supposedly prevalent in Israeli society. He fails to understand the simple fact that the Israel of the 21st century is a Mid-Eastern nation similar in mentality to the rest of the region. The Palestinians did not escape the condescending bias either. With Quixotic impracticality Burg proclaims: ¿If I was a Palestinian today, I would put down my weapon and hug Israel in the only embrace from which it cannot free itself: the embrace of peace.¿ Too bad the Palestinians wouldn¿t listen.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)