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Holy Terror
     

Holy Terror

2.5 4
by Frank Miller
 
There's a deadly menace somewhere in Empire City, and The Fixer only has until dawn to save his town - and civilization as we know it! Legendary Comics presents an all-out, head-busting, bone-breaking, neck-snapping brawl of a tale from Frank Miller, one of the most celebrated storytellers of the medium. Years in the making, HOLY TERROR features the desperate and

Overview

There's a deadly menace somewhere in Empire City, and The Fixer only has until dawn to save his town - and civilization as we know it! Legendary Comics presents an all-out, head-busting, bone-breaking, neck-snapping brawl of a tale from Frank Miller, one of the most celebrated storytellers of the medium. Years in the making, HOLY TERROR features the desperate and brutal quest of a hero as he is forced to run down an army of murderous zealots in order to stop a crime against humanity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781937278007
Publisher:
Legendary Comics LLC
Publication date:
10/11/2011
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 12.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Meet the Author

Frank Miller is one of the seminal creative talents who sparked today's onslaught of motion pictures featuring comic book characters and concepts. He single-handedly re-defined the presentation of comic book characters and heroic fiction with his grand-daddy of graphic novels, THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS. Then his graphic novels turned box-office hits, including 300 and SIN CITY (the film version of which Miller co-directed with Robert Rodriguez), proved that success does not always come wrapped in spandex. Miller also created RONIN, and wrote BATMAN: YEAR ONE, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT STRIKES AGAIN and ALL-STAR BATMAN AND ROBIN THE BOY WONDER for DC Comics. At Dark Horse Comics, Miller wrote THE BIG GUY AND RUSTY THE BOY ROBOT, HARD BOILED, and MARTHA WASHINGTON. The motion picture, THE SPIRIT, marked Miller's solo feature film directorial debut.

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Holy Terror 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
TheClockworkOwl More than 1 year ago
Who cares about the politics? Fools, that's who. This is artistic expression, pure and simple, albeit expression of an emotionally explosive nature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
"Holy Ter­ror" by Frank Miller is a new graphic novel which has our heroes fight­ing Al-Qaeda. The book was writ­ten after 9/11 and it feels like it. The book intro­duces The Fixer chas­ing after cat bur­glar Natalie Stack, if you're think­ing Bat­man and Cat­woman you got it right. After they beat each other up the blood filled intro­duc­tion ends. Then ter­ror strikes in Empire City, The Fixer and Stack go on a rage fueled mis­sion after those responsible. To say that "Holly Ter­ror" by Frank Miller is an angry graphic novel would be an under­state­ment. In a recent inter­view Mr. Miller said that he hopes the book will "really piss peo­ple off", I think he achieved his goal. This is a wrath­ful book and it seems like it was writ­ten right after 9/11 when the nation was in an ass-kicking mood, Miller's rage towards Al-Qaeda is lit­er­ally spilling off the pages. How­ever, ten years later the book is some­times funny, some­times dis­turb­ing, yet sim­plis­tic and could cer­tainly be inter­preted as hate­ful. That being said, a lit­tle of Mr. Miller's sto­ry­telling genius shines through. "Holy Ter­ror" was orig­i­nally sup­posed to be a story about Bat­man, but even for Bat­man this book is far too vio­lent. But the two main char­ac­ters, The Fixer and cat bur­glar Natalie Stack, rep­re­sent Bat­man and Cat­woman, they have dif­fer­ent names and look a lit­tle dif­fer­ent, but there really is no mis­tak­ing who they're sup­pose to be. As in many of his books, Mr. Miller tells a sub­tle story, allows the book to breath in between pan­els and cer­tainly makes strong state­ments about world pol­i­tics with few, if any, words. The art, in Milleresque style, works only for the first quar­ter of the book. It seems to me that the last three quar­ters or so of the book the art became sloppy. The dia­log, some bril­liant, some ridicu­lous but mostly pro­pa­ganda, which, in my opin­ion, is about a decade too late. My prob­lem with the book is that it crosses a fine line. The book infers, inten­tion­ally or not, that Al-Qaeda rep­re­sents Islam. That's like say­ing that the Ku Klux Klan rep­re­sents Chris­tian­ity. Both groups have aspects of their reli­gion in their hate­ful pro­pa­ganda but I would say that the vast major­ity of Chris­tians I met dur­ing my life despise the KKK. The mes­sage in the book, crys­tal clear by the way, is not con­vinc­ing, not bal­anced with weak reasoning. Frank Miller is a won­der­ful artist and an intel­li­gent writer, but this book felt as if a Miller fan wrote it, not the man him­self. The art is all over the place, some pages are absolutely bril­liant, while some are just a mass. How­ever, with all its pos­i­tives, this is an over­sim­pli­fied book with a resent­ful message. There are a few exam­ples which are obvi­ous, The Fixer calls the ter­ror­ists "Mohammed" because "you've got to admit that the odds are pretty good it's Mohammed"