Home Economics: Fourteen Essays

Home Economics: Fourteen Essays

by Wendell Berry
     
 

“My work has been motivated,” Wendell Berry has written, “by a desire to make myself responsibly at home in this world and in my native and chosen place.” In Home Economics, Mr. Berry explores this process and continues to discuss what it means to make oneself “responsibly at home.” His title reminds us that the very root

Overview


“My work has been motivated,” Wendell Berry has written, “by a desire to make myself responsibly at home in this world and in my native and chosen place.” In Home Economics, Mr. Berry explores this process and continues to discuss what it means to make oneself “responsibly at home.” His title reminds us that the very root of economics is stewardship, household management. To paraphrase Confucius, a healthy planet is made up of healthy nations that are simply healthy communities sharing common ground, and communities are gatherings of households. A measure of the health of the planet is economics—the health of its households. Any process of destruction or healing must begin at home. Mr. Berry speaks of the necessary coherence of the “Great Economy,” as he argues for clarity in our lives, our conceptions, and our communications. To live is not to pass time, but to spend time. Whether as critic or as champion, Wendell Berry offers careful insights into our personal and national situation in a prose that is ringing and clear.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Novelist and poet Berry offers an eclectic group of essays on subjects ranging from economics and education to agriculture and the feminist movement. In ``Six Agricultural Fallacies,'' for example, he argues in his typically individualistic way, that agriculture cannot be considered an industry because industry centers on machinery, which is not alive, while agriculture is a matter of living and breathing organisms. He also maintains that a factory may break down and machinery will fall into disrepair, but that soil, when properly used, will never ``wear out.'' Elsewhere he praises the art of working by hand. Noting that he is not an authority on many of his subjects, he gives his opinions nonetheless, which help make this collection quirky and amusing. (June)
Library Journal
Berry, poet, essayist, novelist, and Kentucky farmer, writes insightfully about the passing of community and farm life, the inherent value of hand labor and well-made objects, the uses of wild lands, the decadence of the university, and, especially, the sacred economic order of nature, to which human economies must necessarily be subordinate. Berry's genius for drawing profound lessons from everyday observations shines forth in these powerful essays. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries. Judith Eannarino, George Washington Univ. Lib., Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582434858
Publisher:
Counterpoint Press
Publication date:
05/01/2009
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
301,802
Product dimensions:
5.28(w) x 8.12(h) x 0.45(d)

Meet the Author

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >