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Home Game: An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood [NOOK Book]

Overview

The New York Times bestseller: “Hilarious. No mushy tribute to the joys of fatherhood, Lewis’ book addresses the good, the bad, and the merely baffling about having kids.”—Boston Globe


When Michael Lewis became a father, he decided to keep a written record of what actually happened immediately after the birth of each of his three children. This book is that record. But it is also something else: maybe the funniest, most unsparing account of ordinary daily household life ever ...
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Home Game: An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood

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Overview

The New York Times bestseller: “Hilarious. No mushy tribute to the joys of fatherhood, Lewis’ book addresses the good, the bad, and the merely baffling about having kids.”—Boston Globe


When Michael Lewis became a father, he decided to keep a written record of what actually happened immediately after the birth of each of his three children. This book is that record. But it is also something else: maybe the funniest, most unsparing account of ordinary daily household life ever recorded, from the point of view of the man inside. The remarkable thing about this story isn’t that Lewis is so unusual. It’s that he is so typical. The only wonder is that his wife has allowed him to publish it.
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Editorial Reviews

Janet Maslin
Like Christopher Buckley writing, at the other end of the life cycle, about his parents' deaths in Losing Mum and Pup, Mr. Lewis buffers any discomfort with urbane polish and storytelling skill. Both books manage to be bright and blithe while describing some of the most earthshaking events in their authors' lives.
—The New York Times
Amy Joyce
From the first laugh-out-loud anecdote about his toddler daughter fending off bully boys with words that make Lewis blush and beam, to his wife's nightmarish postpartum depression, he illustrates the life of a modern-day dad who is, yes, much more hands-on than his father, but who still tries to justify not spending time with his second infant after birth…it's similar to Anne Lamott's wonderful Operating Instructions. It's hard to believe anything could compare to her painfully and wonderfully honest book about the first year of her son's life. But here it is. And in a dad's voice, no less. How so not our father's generation.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

After the birth of his first child, bestselling writer Lewis (Moneyball) felt he was a stranger in a strange land, puzzled at the gap between what he thought he should be feeling and what he actually felt. While he expected to be overcome by joy, he often felt puzzled; expecting to feel worried over a child's illness or behavior, he often felt indifferent. Lewis attempts to capture the triumphs, failures, humor, frustration and exhilaration of being a new father during the first year of each of his three children's lives. In one especially hilarious moment, Lewis is in a hotel pool in Bermuda distantly observing his children. When some older boys start teasing his oldest daughter, the youngest daughter, three years old at the time, lets fly a string of profanities at the top of her lungs. The boys retreat and then regroup for a second attack; when they return, she lets fly another string and tells them that she has peed in the pool, causing the boys to go away. All the while, Lewis watches from afar, too embarrassed to claim this youngster as his own but also proud that she has handled herself so smartly. Although Lewis is correct that his fatherhood moments might be more interesting to him than to anyone else, his reflections capture both the unease and the excitement that fatherhood brings. (June)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal
While other authors of parenting memoirs have shown that fathers are vital and needed, Lewis (The Blind Side) here takes pains to celebrate his ineptitude and lack of involvement as a father. Listeners promised an analysis of "the persistent and disturbing gap" between what Lewis was expected to feel and what he actually felt are instead subjected to boring, cranky anecdotes common to new fatherhood. The narration by Dan John Miller (Generation Text) is fine, if a bit bland. Not even those who appreciated Neal Pollack's Alternadad are likely to enjoy this; instead, try Bruce Stockler's I Sleep at Red Lights. [The Norton hc, published in May, was a New York Times best seller.—Ed.]—Douglas C. Lord, Connecticut State Lib., Middletown
Kirkus Reviews
Lewis (The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game, 2006, etc.) updates and expands his Slate series on the business of parenting. After the birth of each of his three children, the author promptly drew up notes on how he tried manfully to fill the demanding job of fatherhood. As wife and family CEO Tabitha provided guidance, the generally inattentive and distracted Lewis recorded the nuttiness of raising daughters Quinn and Dixie and their little brother Walker. It's an engaging journal that selectively details how Dad grew up as well, as caution replaced airy hope and emotion displaced rationality. The first child was, for a while, subjected to the vicissitudes of living in Paris and Gallic notions of childrearing; the French experience seems to have made her a cool analyst of any situation. Back stateside, a second girl was born and sibling rivalry erupted. In California, the couple's third child arrived, and Dad elucidates the effects of scant sleep, management of Mom's postpartum melancholy and infant Walker's frightening illness. "If you want to feel the way you're meant to feel about the new baby," writes Lewis, "you need to do the grunt work." Only with eternal vigilance can fathers insure the well-being and personal development of their progeny. Lewis also follows the trail explored by Dr. Cosby and others investigators of fatherhood, and he includes a riff on his personal surgery-no more children are expected in the Lewis household. Brief, clever and frank-a good gift for Father's Day. Author tour to New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Los Angeles, New Orleans, Denver, Portland, Ore., Washington, D.C.
The Onion A.V. Club
Home Game, which was adapted from a series of Slate essays and is an accordingly zippy read, is hilarious but painfully candid,
one man’s uneasy reckoning with the potentially devastating consequences of parenting. It’s unsparing, but Lewis is as honest with himself as he’s been with his subjects. Grade: A-.
The Los Angeles Times
Lewis's style is funny, frank, and engaging, and he gets a lot of comic mileage telling tales at his own expense....it's refreshing to hear a dad describe so vividly the uglier aspects of the job.— Christopher Noxon
The New York Times Book Review
Lewis writes memorable, insightful, yet simple and brisk sentences as easily as the rest of us breathe.— Marc Tracy
BookPage
Unabashedly frank, hilarious and sweetly sentimental....a somewhat daring and in many ways groundbreaking book about what it’s like to be a father in modern America....intensely honest.— Amy Scribner
Slate
Lewis is an insouciant raconteur who can spin out even standard dad stories (about, say, sending a kid to school dressed outlandishly) without making them sound stale.— Ann Hulbert
People Magazine
He captures serious issues with a warmth that shows he's a pretty good dad after all.— Kyle Smith
Los Angeles Times
“Funny, frank, and engaging. It’s refreshing to hear a dad describe so vividly the uglier aspects of the job.”
People
“His failings amuse . . . and he captures serious moments with a warmth that shows he’s a pretty good dad after all.”
The Onion AV Club
“Home Game, which was adapted from a series of Slate essays and is an accordingly zippy read, is hilarious but painfully candid, one man’s uneasy reckoning with the potentially devastating consequences of parenting. It’s unsparing, but Lewis is as honest with himself as he’s been with his subjects. Grade: A-.”
Marc Tracy - The New York Times Book Review
“Lewis writes memorable, insightful, yet simple and brisk sentences as easily as the rest of us breathe.”
Amy Scribner - BookPage
“Unabashedly frank, hilarious and sweetly sentimental....a somewhat daring and in many ways groundbreaking book about what it’s like to be a father in modern America....intensely honest.”
Ann Hulbert - Slate
“Lewis is an insouciant raconteur who can spin out even standard dad stories (about, say, sending a kid to school dressed outlandishly) without making them sound stale.”
People
“His failings amuse . . . and he captures serious moments with a warmth that shows he’s a pretty good dad after all.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393071382
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 6/7/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 349,366
  • File size: 669 KB

Meet the Author

Michael  Lewis
Michael Lewis, the best-selling author of Liar’s Poker, The Money Culture, The New New Thing, Moneyball, The Blind Side, Panic, Home Game, The Big Short, and Boomerang, among other works, lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife and three children.

Biography

Twenty-four year-old Princeton graduate Michael Lewis had recently received his master's degree from the London School of Economics when Salomon Brothers hired him as a bond salesman in 1985. He moved to New York for training and witnessed firsthand the cutthroat, scruple-free culture that was Wall Street in the 1980s. Several months later, armed only with what he'd learned in training, Lewis returned to London and spent the next three years dispensing investment advice to Salomon's well-heeled clientele. He earned hundreds of thousands of dollars and survived a 1987 hostile takeover attempt at the firm. Nonetheless, he grew disillusioned with his job and left Salomon to write an account of his experiences in the industry. Published in 1989, Liar's Poker remains one of the best written and most perceptive chronicles of investment banking and the appalling excesses of an era.

Since then, Lewis has found great success as a financial journalist and bestselling author. His nonfiction ranges over a variety of topics, including U.S./Japanese business relations (Pacific Rift), the 1996 presidential campaign (Trail Fever), Silicon Valley (The New New Thing), and the Internet boom (Next: The Future Just Happened). He investigated the economics of professional sports in Moneyball (2003) and The Blind Side (2006); and, in 2008, he edited Panic, an anthology of essays about the major financial crises of 1990s and early "oughts."

Good To Know

Michael Lewis attended Isidore Newman School in his native New Orleans, LA -- a private college prep school that counts among its more distinguished alumni historian Walter Isaacson, children's book author Mo Willems, singer Harry Connick, Jr., and famous pro-football siblings Peyton and Eli Manning.
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    1. Date of Birth:
      October 15, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      New Orleans, LA
    1. Education:
      Princeton University, B.A. in Art History, 1982; London School of Economics, 1985

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 41 )
Rating Distribution

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(15)

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(12)

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(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Home Game Hits a Home Run

    HOME GAME:An Accidential Guide
    To Fatherhood
    Michael Lewis
    W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.
    500 Fifth Avenue
    New York, NY 10110
    ISBN: 978-0-393-06901-3
    $23.95 - Hardback
    190 pages

    HOME GAME: An Accidential Guide to Fatherhood by Michael Lewis is an honest account of one father's experience with raising his children. While most fathers' would "think" what Lewis is saying, most of them would mute the actual words.

    This work is written in three parts, each part dedicated to one of Lewis's children. His account of the birthing process is hilarious. He states, "A woman in labor needs to believe, however much evidence she has to the contrary, that the man in waiting beside her bed is directing every ounce of his concern toward her. He learns to camouflage trips to the john as grape juice-fetching missions, When he is hungry he waits until his wife dozes off, then nips furtively down to the hospital vending machine for his supper of Ring Dings and Nacho Cheese Doritos." He continues to say that no one really cares how Dad is doing, nor, do they care about his fatigue, his worries, his tedium, his disappointment at the contents of the hospital vending machine - these are better unmentioned. Above all, he must know that if his mask of perfect selflessness slips for even a moment he will be nabbed.

    His account of his daughter's encounter with older boys who try to ruin her and her sister's day at the pool is so funny that I had to put the book down until I could get control of my laughter.

    What Lewis actually says is what we all have felt at some period in parenting our children. However, we are not brave enough to put our feelings in print. So, I am awed by Michael Lewis's ability to just put it all out there for his readers.

    Any new parent should read this book, male or female. It will help you to realize that there is no wrong way to parent, just do your best and the children usually become reasonable people.

    This would make a good gift for new parents, anyone wanting to read a light-hearted family book or a man who has been asked by his wife to have a vasectomy. Don't ask, just read the book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 2, 2009

    Too funny for words!

    I admit i am a huge fan of michael lewis and a father of 4. therefore i am obviously the bullseye on the target for the book. that being said this is a fine book with fantastic images and his usual very insightful way of looking at things. i was literally gut-laughing at times. it is a quick read and worth it. i am already making a list of folks to whom i will send the book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 27, 2009

    Terrible.

    What a piece of fluff.A great waste of a wonderful author's talents.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    Just got it

    Its very funny !!!! Get of ur nuts!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2012

    Very funny, quick read

    Read this at the recommendation of a colleague in August, and ended up reading this on the beach and getting some looks from my family because i was laughing out loud so much. Great book for anyone who has been through this, or is about to.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2012

    Easy read, hilarious parenting experience!

    Not his typical subject matter, Home Game was light-hearted fun. I couldn't stop crying from laughter.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 6, 2011

    Underwhelming

    I'm a big Michael Lewis fan, but this was by far the least interesting of his works. Although definitely humorous at times, I thought it lacked the 'laugh out loud' stories promised by other reviews.

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