Home Is Where We Start From

Home Is Where We Start From

by D. W. Winnicott
     
 

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One of the most gifted and creative psychoanalysts of his generation, D. W. Winnicott made lasting contributions to our understanding of the minds of children.
His ideas have influenced the diverse psychoanalytic schools of Anna Freud, Melanie Klein, and Hans Kohut. But his reach extends far beyond professional circles: his talks to general audiences over

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Overview

One of the most gifted and creative psychoanalysts of his generation, D. W. Winnicott made lasting contributions to our understanding of the minds of children.
His ideas have influenced the diverse psychoanalytic schools of Anna Freud, Melanie Klein, and Hans Kohut. But his reach extends far beyond professional circles: his talks to general audiences over the years won him enormous numbers of followers among parents and teachers who have found his observations rich in penetrating insight.
This collection brings together many of Winnicott's most important pieces, including previously unpublished talks and several essays from books and journals now difficult to obtain. They range widely in topic—from "The Concept of a Healthy Individual" and "The Value of Depression" to "Delinquency as a Sign of Hope"—and elucidate some of Winnicott's seminal ideas, such as the "transitional object" and the concept of false self. All convey Winnicott's vision of the ways in which the developing self interacts with the family and the larger society.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
It's unusual for find a psychotherapist with a Freudian approach arguing that men's envy of women may be as strong as women's phallic envy. But Winnicott, who died in 1971, was no ordinary therapist. An original, idiosyncratic, occasionally crotchety writer and lecturer, the British psychoanalyst, we learn here, speculated freely and sometimes prophetically on teenage conflicts and suicide, people who erect a ``false self,'' birth control, feminism, the Berlin wall and the family's changing role. In these essays and talks, he views adolescence as a life-or-death struggle for maturity, discusses the positive value of depression as a means of coping, explores creative ways to teach mathematics, and argues that men are risk-takers because they are denied the experience of childbirth. The essays are marked by earnestness, colloquial informality and shrewd insights into personal and social ills that afflict us today. January 27
Library Journal
Among the best loved of modern psychoanalysts and perhaps most accessible of Britain's object relations school was Winnicott, a pediatrician turned psychoanalyst. The pieces in this collection (most previously unpublished and derived from talks to nonpsychiatrists) illustrate the scope of his concerns, the simplicity of his ideas about complex matters, and his inspired metaphorical linking of concepts. The essays range widelyfrom the healthy individual and family to a lovely piece on the ``value of depression'' and to some of his more basic concepts about the false self and the transitional object. The absence of jargon makes this work particularly inviting for laypersons. More informed readers may object to the lack of scholarly notes and to some of more ``creative'' intuitive leaps, but will soon be drawn in by Winnicott's many profound insights. Paul Hymowitz, Psychiatry Dept . , Cornell Medical Ctr.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393306675
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
06/01/1990
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
1,369,549
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.65(d)

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