Home Networking with Microsoft Windows XP Step by Step

Overview

Experience learning made easy—and quickly teach yourself how to use the built-in networking features in Microsoft® Windows® XP. With STEP BY STEP, you drive the instruction. Work at your own pace through the clear, step-by-step directions. From installing hardware to setting up instant messaging, you’ll learn exactly what you need so you can do more and get more from your connected home!

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Overview

Experience learning made easy—and quickly teach yourself how to use the built-in networking features in Microsoft® Windows® XP. With STEP BY STEP, you drive the instruction. Work at your own pace through the clear, step-by-step directions. From installing hardware to setting up instant messaging, you’ll learn exactly what you need so you can do more and get more from your connected home!

  • Choose the right network solution for you—from Ethernet to wireless
  • Use an easy wizard to connect to the Internet
  • Quickly link your Windows-based computers, and create personalized user accounts
  • Make it easy for everyone in your house to share a single printer or Internet account
  • Share information, pictures, and music at home or over the Internet, but keep private files private
  • Use the built-in firewall to fend off hackers and other security threats
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
So you've got a brand-new Windows XP Home Edition computer (or you've just upgraded an older system). Now you'd like to network it with the older PC (or PCs) floating around your house. Windows XP Home Edition makes it easy: this concise, step-by-step book makes it easier.

The authors recognize that you're probably not networking two XP systems, and they walk you step-by-step through connecting PCs running older versions of Windows, especially Windows 98 and the somewhat trickier Windows 2000. There's briefer -- but adequate -- coverage of connecting Macs, as well.

You'll learn how to share your Internet connection; use XP's built-in firewall; set up Internet Explorer security zones, and use IE6's new privacy features. There's a full chapter on sharing files (including how to restrict access to a shared folder or file). There are detailed instructions for sharing printers and removable drives.

Most folks build home networks for prosaic reasons -- to share printers or web connections. But once your network's in place, you can get more creative -- and the final chapter of this book points the way. You're in the kitchen and want to get everyone downstairs for dinner? Use Windows Messenger's audio feature. Playing Minesweeper and want some help from the house expert? Share the app. Can't figure out how to use that obscure feature in Word? Use Remote Assistance.

Home Networking with Microsoft Windows XP Step by Step doesn't overburden you with theory or lingo: You learn all this in just 170 pages, glossary and all. Combine Windows XP Home Edition and this book, and Windows home networking is finally, almost, a no-brainer. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer with nearly 20 years' experience in helping technology companies deploy and market advanced software, computing, and networking products and services. He served for nearly ten years as vice president of a New Jersey–based marketing company, where he supervised a wide range of graphics and web design projects. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735614352
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2001
  • Series: Microsoft Step by Step Series
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 7.38 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Meet the Author

Heather Galioto is a technical writer and UA manager in the Connected Home Business Unit of Microsoft. She has many years of technical writing experience at Microsoft, the last two of which have been focused on home networking.

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Table of Contents

What's New with Networking in Microsoft Windows XP
Getting Help
Conventions and Features
1 Introduction to Home Networking 1
2 Connecting Your Computers Together 6
3 Connecting to the Internet 24
4 Installing the Home Networking Software 40
5 Securing Your Home Network 70
6 Sharing Data on the Network 86
7 Sharing Printers and Other Peripherals 112
8 Communicating and Collaborating with Others on Your Network 126
Glossary 159
Index 167
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First Chapter

Chapter 4.
Installing the Home Networking Software


  • Setting Up Your Windows XPComputer for Home Networking
  • Adding a Windows Computer to Your Home Network
  • Adding a Windows 2000 Professional Computer to Your Home Network
  • Adding Users to Your Windows XP Computer

Chapter 4   Installing the Home Networking Software

After completing this chapter, you will be able to:
  • Configure a Windows XP computer for home networking
  • Add additional Windows 98, Windows Me, and Windows XP computers to your home network
  • Add a Windows 95 computer to your home network
  • Add a Windows 2000 Professional computer to your home network
  • Add a Macintosh computer to your home network
  • Set up a Windows XP computer to connect to an existing home network

Now that you've installed your networking hardware and connected to the Internet, you're ready to take the final step to create a home network: installing the homenetworking software on each computer. Fortunately, the Network Setup Wizard in Microsoft Windows XP makes it easy by automatically configuring your computer to communicate on the network. In addition, you can run the Network Setup Wizard on the other computers that you want to add to your network, including Microsoft Windows 98, Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition, and Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me) computers. With the help of Windows XP, installing the home networking software and configuring your home network is a snap.

In this chapter, you will learn how to use the Network Setup Wizard to configure a Windows XP computer for home networking and to add additional Windows computers to your home network. You'll also learn how to add a Macintosh computer to your network. Finally, if you already have a home network, you'll learn how to set up a Windows XP computer to connect to an existing network.

To complete the exercises in this chapter, you will need to:

  • Install and configure the appropriate network hardware on each computer that you want to add to your network. (For more information, see Chapter 2, "Connecting Your Computers Together.")
  • Decide which computer to use as the Internet Connection Sharing host, and set up an Internet connection on that computer. It is highly recommended that you use a Windows XP computer as the Internet Connection Sharing host or a third-party gateway that supports Universal Plug and Play (UPnP). (For more information, see Chapter 3, "Connecting to the Internet.")
  • Make sure that all computers, printers, and other devices that you want to add to your network are set up and turned on.
  • Locate your Windows XP Installation CD-ROM or a blank 3.5-inch floppy disk, and keep it handy.

Setting Up Your Windows XPComputer for Home Networking

The Network Setup Wizard walks you step by step through the process of configuring your network. All you have to do to set up your home network is run the wizard on your Windows XP computer and then run the wizard on each additional Windows 98, Windows Me, or Windows XP computer that you want to add to your home network.
IMPORTANT:
If you want to add a Windows 95 or Windows 2000 Professional computer to your network, you won't be able to use the Network Setup Wizard. Instead, you'll have to configure the settings manually. The steps for connecting each of these operating systems are described later in this chapter.

The Network Setup Wizard helps you to perform the following tasks:

  • Configure a Windows XP computer for home networking.
  • Add additional Windows 98, Windows Me, and Windows XP computers to the home network.
  • Set up Internet Connection Sharing on the network with one computer as the Internet Connection Sharing host.
  • Set up a shared folder on each computer on the network.
  • Share printers that are attached to computers on the network.

In this exercise, you're setting up a home network using a Windows XP computer and several Windows 98 Second Edition computers. You've connected the computers together using Ethernet network adapters, a hub, and CAT5 UTP cable. You've made sure that all computers on the network are turned on. You've decided to use the Windows XP computer as the Internet Connection Sharing host, and you have already set up an Internet connection on that computer. To use the Network Setup Wizard to set up the Windows XP computer for home networking, complete the following steps:

  1. On the Start menu, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Network Setup Wizard.
  2. The Network Setup Wizard starts:

    (Image Unavailable)

  3. Click Next.
  4. The Before You Continue page appears, listing steps that you need to take before you proceed:

    (Image Unavailable)

  5. Make sure that you've completed the steps listed, and then click Next.
  6. The Select A Connection Method page appears.

  7. Select the This Computer Connects Directly To The Internet option, and then click Next.
  8. The Select Your Internet Connection page appears:

    (Image Unavailable)


    TIP:
    The options on your screen may be different than those in the examples shown. If you have multiple connections on your computer, there will be several connections to choose from. If your Internet connection is active, Windows XP will highlight the correct connection for you. If your Internet connection isn't active, make sure that you choose the connection that connects your computer to the Internet. This could be a modem or a local area connection (for broadband connections). If you use broadband, make sure you choose the local area connection that connects to your broadband modem.

    IMPORTANT:
    Keep in mind that for other computers on the network to be able to access the Internet through Internet Connection Sharing, the Internet Connection Sharing host must be turned on.
  9. Select your Internet connection in the list, and click Next.
  10. The Give This Computer A Description And Name page appears.

  11. In the Computer Description box, type a short description of your computer (such as Family Room Computer), and in the Computer Name box, type a name (such as Heather or Basement Office), and then click Next.
  12. The Name Your Network page appears.

  13. In the Workgroup Name box, leave the default name, and click Next.
  14. The Ready To Apply Network Settings page appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  15. Review the settings listed, and then click Next.
  16. The wizard configures the computer for home networking, including turning on the Internet firewall, sharing the Internet connection, sharing any printers connected to the computer, and sharing the computer's Shared Documents folder. This may take a moment. When the wizard is finished, the You're Almost Done page appears:

    (Image Unavailable)


    TIP:
    You can use a floppy disk instead of the Windows XP CD to run the Network Setup Wizard on the other computers on your network. To create a Network Setup Disk, select the Create A Network Setup Disk option on the You're Almost Done page. If you want to create a Network Setup Disk at a later time, run the Network Setup Wizard again on your Windows XP computer, and select all the same options for the network configuration, except on the You're Almost Done page, select the Create A Network Setup Disk option.
  17. Select the Use My Windows XP CD option, and then click Next.
  18. The To Run The Wizard With The Windows XP CD page appears.

  19. Review the instructions, and then click Next.
  20. The Completing The Network Setup Wizard page appears.

  21. Click Finish to close the wizard.
  22. Your Windows XP computer is now set up for home networking. Next you should use the Windows XP CD to run the wizard on each Windows 98, Windows Me, and Windows XP computer that you want to add to the network.

Adding a Windows Computer to Your Home Network

Once you have used the Network Setup Wizard to set up your Windows XP computer for home networking, you can use the wizard to add any of the following computers to your home network:
  • Windows XP
  • Windows Me
  • Windows 98 or Windows 98 Second Edition

In this exercise, you're setting up a home network using a Windows XP computer and several Windows 98 Second Edition computers. You've connected the computers together using Ethernet network adapters, a hub, and CAT5 UTP cable. You've made sure that all computers on the network are turned on. You've run the Network Setup Wizard on the Windows XP computer, and now you will run the Network Setup Wizard on a Windows 98 Second Edition computer.


IMPORTANT:
If you want to add a Windows 95 or Windows 2000 Professional computer to your network, you won't be able to use the Network Setup Wizard. Instead, you'll have to configure the settings manually. The steps for connecting each of these operating systems are described later in this chapter.

The following steps will work on a Windows 98, Windows Me, or Windows XPcomputer:

  1. Verify that the Windows XP computer that you are using as your Internet Connection Sharing host is turned on.
  2. Insert your Windows XP CD into the CD-ROM drive of the Windows computer that you want to add to your network.
  3. The Welcome To Microsoft Windows XP screen appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  4. In the What Do You Want To Do? list, click Perform Additional Tasks, and then click Set Up A Home Or Small Office Network.
  5. The Network Setup Wizard dialog box appears:

    (Image Unavailable)


    TIP:
    If you are running the Network Setup Wizard from a floppy disk, insert the disk into the disk drive of the computer that you want to add to the network. On the Start menu, click Run, and then type a:\netsetup, and press Enter.
  6. Click Yes.
  7. The Network Setup Wizard starts. If you are prompted to restart your computer, remove all floppy disks and CDs from the drives, and then click OK.

  8. To restart your computer, click Yes.
  9. The computer restarts, and the Network Setup Wizard appears.

  10. In the Network Setup Wizard, click Next.
  11. The Before You Continue page appears, listing steps that you need to take before you proceed.

  12. Make sure that you've completed the steps listed on the page, and then click Next.
  13. The Select A Connection Method page appears.

  14. Select the This Computer Connects To The Internet Through AnotherComputer In My Network Or Through A Residential Gateway option, and then click Next.
  15. The Give This Computer A Description And Name page appears.

  16. In the Computer Description box, type a short description of your computer, and in the Computer Name box, type a name (such as Heather or Basement Office), and then click Next.
  17. The Name Your Network page appears.

  18. In the Workgroup Name box, leave the default name, MSHOME, and then click Next.
  19. The Ready To Apply Network Settings page appears.


    IMPORTANT:
    Be sure to give each computer on the network a unique name.
  20. Review the settings listed, and then click Next.
  21. The wizard configures the computer for home networking, including sharing any printers connected to the computer and creating a folder called Shared Documents in each user's My Documents folder.

  22. Click Finish to close the wizard, and then click Yes to restart your computer.
  23. Repeat these steps for each additional Windows 98, Windows Me, or Windows XP computer that you want to add to your network.

IMPORTANT:
If you use a Windows 98 or Windows Me computer, be sure to click OK in theWindows Network Password dialog box whenever you log on to the computer, evenif you don't have a password assigned to your user account. If you click Cancel,Windows will start normally, but you won't have access to the network.

Adding a Windows 95 Computer to Your Home Network

The Network Setup Wizard does not support Windows 95 computers. To connect a Windows 95 computer to your home network, you have two options:

  • Upgrade the computer to Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Me, and then use the Windows XP Network Setup Wizard toconnect the computer to the network.
  • Manually configure the Windows 95 computer by using the Network dialog box available through Control Panel.

In this exercise, you have already set up your Windows XP computer for homenetworking. To add a Windows 95 computer to your home network and createand share a folder on the Windows 95 computer's hard disk, complete the fol-lowing steps:

  1. Verify that the Windows 95 computer's network adapter is installed and configured properly and that the computer is connected to the network.
  2. Refer to the documentation that came with the network adapter if you need additional information.

  3. On the Start menu, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  4. Control Panel appears.

  5. Double-click the Network icon.
  6. The Network dialog box appears. The settings that you see might be different from those shown on the facing page:

    (Image Unavailable)

  7. On the Configuration tab, make sure that the following network components appear in the The Following Network Components Are Installed list:
    • Client for Microsoft Networks
    • The network adapter used to connect to the network
    • File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks
    • TCP/IP

    To add any of these components, click the Add button. The Select Network Component Type dialog box appears, allowing you to select and add the necessary components.


    TIP:
    To add TCP/IP, in the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Protocol, click Add, click Microsoft in the Manufacturers list, click TCP/IP in the Network Protocols list, and then click OK.
  8. After you've added any required network components, click the File And Print Sharing button.
  9. The File And Print Sharing dialog box appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  10. Make sure that the I Want To Be Able To Give Others Access To My Files check box is selected, and then click OK.

  11. TIP:
    If you want to share a printer on your network, you should connect it to the computer that is being used as the Internet Connection Sharing host. In order for other computers on the network to gain access to a shared resource, the computer sharing the resource must be turned on. On your network, the Internet Connection Sharing host is the computer most likely to be turned on and available.
  12. Click the Identification tab of the Network dialog box, and type a name and description for the computer. Be sure that the computer name is unique on the network and less than 15 characters long.
  13. In the Workgroup box, type MSHOME.
  14. If the computers on your home network use a different workgroup name, type that name instead.

  15. Click OK to close the Network dialog box.
  16. If you are prompted to insert the Windows 95 CD-ROM, do so. When Windows 95 is finished copying files, you will be prompted to restart your computer.

    After restarting your computer, the Enter Network Password dialog box appears, prompting you to type a user name and password to log on to Windows.

  17. Make up a user name and type it in. You can either enter a password or leave the password box blank. Click OK.

  18. IMPORTANT:
    It is very important that you click OK in the Enter Network Password dialog box. If you click Cancel, Windows will start normally, but you will not have access to the network.
  19. To view the other computers on the network, double-click the Network Neighorhood icon on the Windows desktop.
  20. The Network Neighborhood window appears:

    (Image Unavailable)


    TROUBLESHOOTING:
    If you can't see any other computers on the network, make sure that on the Windows 95 computer, the cables are connected properly, the workgroup name is MSHOME (or whatever workgroup name the other computers on your network are using), and File And Print Sharing is enabled. In addition, try logging off of the computer and logging on again, making sure to click OK instead of Cancel in the Enter Network Password dialog box.
  21. Double-click the My Computer icon on the Windows desktop.
  22. In the My Computer window, double-click the computer's hard disk (probably the drive C).
  23. On the File menu, point to New, and then click Folder.
  24. A new folder appears, ready for you to type a name for it.

  25. Type Shared Docs, and press Enter.
  26. Right-click the Shared Docs folder, and click Sharing on the shortcut menu.
  27. The Properties dialog box appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  28. On the Sharing tab, select the Shared As option.
  29. In the Access Type area, select the Full option, and then click OK.
  30. The icon for the Shared Docs folder now displays a hand under it, indicating that the folder is shared on the network and that other computers can gain access to the files stored on it:

    (Image Unavailable)

    For more information on sharing files and folders on the network, see Chapter 6, "Sharing Data on the Network."


TIP:
Your Windows 95 computer can gain access to the Internet through a Windows XP Internet Connection Sharing host. To do this, change the settings of your Web browser so that it will connect to the Internet through the local area network. See the Help file of your Web browser for information about changing how your Web browser connects to the Internet.

Bringing a Laptop Computer Home from Work

If you use a Windows laptop computer at work, you may want to occasionally bring it home and connect it to your home network to share files or print documents. Your computer at work might already be set up for networking, which will simplify this process.

If both your home and office networks are Ethernet networks, you can use the laptop computer's existing network adapter to connect it to your home network. Just attach the Ethernet cable to your laptop's network adapter, and plug the other end of the cable into an available port on your network hub. If you have a different type of home network, such as a home phoneline (HomePNA) network, you can add your laptop computer to the network by first setting up a network bridge. The network bridge that is built into Windows XP makes it easy to connect two different types of networks. In this case, install an Ethernet network adapter on your home Windows XP computer, use it to connect to the Ethernet adapter on the laptop computer (with the appropriate hardware and cables), and then set up the Windows XP network bridge between the Ethernet and the phoneline connection. The network bridge will make sure that the Ethernet network used by your work laptop can communicate with the HomePNA network used by your home network. Network bridges are described in more detail in Chapter 2, "Connecting Your Computers Together."

If the laptop uses Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows Me, or Windows XP and is already set up for a corporate network, you won't need to run the Network Setup Wizard or otherwise change its network settings for it to communicate. Instead, just physically connect it to the network. To gain access to shared folders and files on the network, simply map a network drive or add a new network place (covered in Chapter 6, "Sharing Data on the Network," for Windows XP computers). To use a printer on your network, use the Add Printer Wizard (discussed in Chapter 7, "Sharing Printers and Other Peripherals," for Windows XP computers).


Tip:
If you have a WiFi wireless network at home, and you have a wireless card for your laptop computer, Windows XP Professional offers zero configuration networking. This means that if you bring a laptop with a wireless card home from work and take it within range of your wireless home network, your computer will automatically be able to use network resources on your home network.

If the laptop computer runs Windows 2000 Professional, follow the instructions given in the next section.

Adding a Windows 2000 Professional Computer to Your Home Network

Unfortunately, Windows 2000 computers can't be connected to a home network as quickly or easily as Windows XP, Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Me computers. The easiest way to connect a Windows 2000 computer to a home network is to upgrade the Windows 2000 computer to Windows XP, and then follow the instructions provided in this book for connecting a Windows XP computer to your network. However, this may not always be an option for you, especially if you plan to connect a computer that you don't own, such as a laptop computer from work, to your network. With some patience, however, you can still connect a Windows 2000 computer to your Windows XP home network. Windows 2000 exhibits the following traits on a Windows XP network:
  • For non–Windows 2000 computers on the network to be able to see shared folders on the Windows 2000 computer, you will have to manually configure each non–Windows 2000 computer to access shared files and folders on the Windows 2000 computer. To do this, on each Windows computer, double-click the My Network Places or Network Neighborhood icon, and then click the Add Network Place icon.
  • To access shared folders and printers on your home network, you will have to manually configure the Windows 2000 computer. To add a shared folder, double-click the My Network Places icon on the Windows desktop, and then click the Add Network Place icon. To add a printer, on the Start menu, point to Settings, click Printers, and click the Add Printer icon to start the Add Printer Wizard.
  • To modify certain settings on a Windows 2000 computer, you will need to be able to log on with Administrator privileges. See the sidebar "Logging on as Administrator in Windows 2000" on the following page for more information.

In this exercise, you have brought home the Windows 2000 laptop that you use at work so that you can connect it to your home network. Because the laptop was already set up for the corporate network, you didn't need to change its networksettings. Both your home network and corporate network use Ethernet, so you connected the Windows 2000 computer to an Ethernet cable that's plugged into the hub of the home network. Then you shared a folder on the Windows 2000 computer. To set up a Windows XP computer on your network so that it can gain access to the shared folder on the Windows 2000 computer, complete the following steps:

  1. On the Windows XP computer on your network, on the Start menu, click My Network Places.
  2. In the Network Tasks list, click Add A Network Place.
  3. The Add A Network Place Wizard starts.

  4. Click Next.
  5. The Where Do You Want To Create This Network Place? page appears.

  6. Click Choose Another Network Location, and then click Next.
  7. The What Is The Address Of This Network Place? page appears.

  8. Type the location of the shared folder that you want to access. This should be in the format \\computer name\shared folder name (for example, \\Workcomputer\Shareddocs). Click Next.
  9. The wizard locates the shared folder, and the What Do You Want To Name This Place? page appears.

  10. Type a name for the network place (for example, Shared docs on Work computer). Click Next.
  11. The Completing The Add Network Place page appears.

  12. Click Finish to close the wizard.
  13. The shortcut to the shared folder on the Windows 2000 computer is created. You can now double-click this shortcut to gain access to the shared folder:

    (Image Unavailable)

Logging on as Administrator in Windows 2000

Unlike with Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows 98 Second Edition computers, you will need to log on to the Windows 2000 Professional computer using an account with Administrator privileges to add a printer, add a network place, or map a network drive. If you are using a Windows 2000 computer from work, you may or may not have these privileges, depending on the network security policy of your employer. If you are unsure whether you have Administrator privileges, ask your company's network administrator.

All Windows 2000 computers have a built-in user account called Administrator that has Administrator privileges. If you know the password for the Administrator account, you can log on and change system settings, including adding a printer, adding a network place, or mapping a network drive. To log on to a Windows 2000 Professional computer with Administrator privileges:

  1. Turn on your Windows 2000 Professional computer.
  2. Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete to begin.
  3. In the User Name box, type Administrator.
  4. In the Password box, type the Administrator password for your computer.
  5. Click the down arrow to the right of the Log On To box, and in the drop-down list, click the name of the computer followed by (this computer).
  6. Click OK to log on.
  7. The Log On To Windows dialog box appears.

Now you can use the Add Printer Wizard on your Windows 2000 Professional computer to access shared printers on your home network. You can also access shared folders on the computers on your home network by mapping drives or adding new network places.

Adding a Macintosh Computer to Your Home Network

What if you have a Macintosh computer that you want to connect to your Windows XP home network? Although you cannot use Windows XP's Network Setup Wizard for this, you can still connect a Macintosh computer to a Windows home network. If you want to use your Macintosh computer only to take advantage of Windows XP's Internet Connection Sharing feature, you do not need to purchase any networking software. Just make sure that the TCP/IP networking protocol is installed on your Macintosh and that your network settings are configured to be automatic. Then configure your Internet browser to use the LAN to connect to the Internet. (See the documentation that came with your Macintosh computer for specific configuration instructions.) If you want to take advantage of shared files or shared printers, you need to purchase a third-party software product such as PC MACLAN or DAVE.

PC MACLAN, from Miramar Systems (www.miramar.com), makes it possible for Windows computers to understand Macintosh networking. This is a good solution if you are adding a Windows computer to a predominantly Macintosh network. This approach requires installing the PC MACLAN software on every Windows computer that you want to have access to your Macintosh computers.

DAVE, from Thursby Software (www.thursby.com), makes it possible for Macintosh computers to understand Windows networking. This is a good solution if you are adding a Macintosh computer to a predominantly Windows network. This approach requires installing the DAVE software on every Macintosh computer that you want to have access to your Windows computers.


TIP:
When combining Macintosh computers and Windows computers on the samenetwork, it is important to remember that some file formats do not work on both computers. For example, there are subtle differences between the Windows version and the Macintosh version of the TIFF format for graphic files, so file conversion is necessary if you want to be able to use a TIFF file on both Macintosh and Windows computers. However, if you have a graphic file in JPEG format, both Windows and Macintosh computers can use it without any conversion. Additionally, files created with Microsoft Word 2002 or Microsoft Excel 2002 can be seamlessly transferred between a Macintosh and a Windows computer. See the documentation that came with your application to find out more about Windows and Macintosh file format compatibility.

Adding a Windows XP Computer to an Existing Windows Network

You can add a new Windows XP computer to an existing home network by simply connecting the computer to the network and then running the Network Setup Wizard. The wizard will walk you through the process of configuring your Windows XP computer for the existing network.


TIP:
If your network is using a protocol called IPX/SPX instead of TCP/IP, you may need to reconfigure your network. The Network Setup Wizard makes this process easy, so you can take advantage of the latest networking technologies to make your home network run seamlessly. Run the Network Setup Wizard on all the computers on your IPX/SPX network to ensure that they communicate in the same language.

However, before you add a Windows XP computer to an existing home network, consider the following questions:

  • Does your network have existing network security measures, such as a firewall or gateway, that you would like to continue using?
  • Do you already use Internet Connection Sharing on your home network?

If you answered yes to either of those questions, you won't be taking advantage of some of the advanced new features included with Windows XP. Keep in mind that in addition to including a firewall, Windows XP uses a more advanced method for Internet Connection Sharing than previous versions of Windows. As a result, you should make sure that a Windows XP computer serves as the Internet Connection Sharing host for your network. For more information, see the sidebar "Keeping Your Network's Existing Security Features," later in this chapter.


TIP:
Windows XP offers a feature called a network bridge, which allows you to seamlessly combine different types of networks. For example, you may want to add computers using a wireless or HomePNA network to an existing Ethernet network. If you attach both types of adapters to your Windows XP computer as described in Chapter 2, "Connecting Your Computers Together," the computer can act as a network bridge, allowing both types of networks to communicate with each other.

In this exercise, you have set up a home network composed of several Windows 98 Second Edition computers. One of the Windows 98 Second Edition computers serves as the Internet Connection Sharing host. You will add a new Windows XP computer to the network, and reconfigure the home network so that the Windows XP computer will be the Internet Connection Sharing host. To turn off Internet Connection Sharing on the Windows 98 Second Edition computer currently serving as the Internet Connection Sharing host, configure its new Internet settings, and then set up your Windows XP computer as the new Internet Connection Sharing host, complete the following steps:

  1. On the Windows 98 Second Edition computer that serves as the Internet Connection Sharing host, on the Start menu, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs.
  3. The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears.

  4. Click the Windows Setup tab:
  5. (Image Unavailable)

  6. In the Components list, select Internet Tools.
  7. In the Description area, click Details.
  8. The Internet Tools dialog box appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  9. In the Components list, clear the Internet Connection Sharing check box.
  10. Click OK to close the Internet Tools dialog box.
  11. Click OK to close the Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box.
  12. On the Windows 98 Second Edition computer, on the Start menu, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to Internet Tools, and then click Internet Connection Wizard.
  13. The Internet Connection Wizard starts:

    (Image Unavailable)

  14. Select the I Want To Set Up My Internet Connection Manually Or I Want To Connect Through A Local Area Network (LAN) option, and then click Next.
  15. The Setting Up Your Internet Connection page appears.

  16. Select the I Connect Through A Local Area Network (LAN) option, and then click Next.
  17. The Local Area Network Internet Configuration page is displayed.

  18. Select the Automatic Discovery Of Proxy Server (Recommended) check box, and then click Next.
  19. The Set Up Your Internet Mail Account page appears, as shown on the facing page:

    (Image Unavailable)

  20. Select the No option, and then click Next.
  21. The Completing The Internet Connection Wizard page appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  22. Clear the To Connect To The Internet Immediately, Select This Box And Then Click Finish check box, and then click Finish.
  23. If prompted, restart your computer.
  24. Set up an Internet connection on your Windows XP computer. (See Chapter 2, "Connecting Your Computers Together," for more information.)
  25. Verify that your Windows XP computer is physically connected to the network, that all computers on your network are turned on, and that all connected peripherals, such as printers, are turned on.
  26. On the Windows XP computer, on the Start menu, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Network Setup Wizard.
  27. The Network Setup Wizard starts:

    (Image Unavailable)

  28. Click Next.
  29. The Before You Continue page appears, listing steps that you need to take before you proceed.

  30. Make sure that you've completed the steps listed on the page, and then click Next.
  31. The Select A Connection Method page appears, as shown on the facing page:

    (Image Unavailable)

  32. Click the This Computer Connects Directly To The Internet option, and then click Next.
  33. The Select Your Internet Connection page appears.


    TIP:
    If you have multiple connections on your computer, there will be several connections to choose from. If your computer is connected to the Internet, Windows XP will highlight the correct connection for you. If your Internet connection isn't active, make sure that you choose the connection that connects your computer to the Internet. This could be a modem or a local area connection (for broadband). If you use broadband, make sure you choose the local area connection that connects to your broadband modem.
  34. In the Connections list, select your Internet connection, and then click Next.
  35. The Give This Computer A Description And Name page appears.

  36. In the Computer Description box, type a short description of your computer (such as Office Computer) and in the Computer Name box, type a name (such as Heather or Basement Office), and then click Next.
  37. The Name Your Network Page appears.

  38. In the Workgroup Name box, type the name of the workgroup that the computers on your local area network are using, and then click Next.
  39. The Ready To Apply Network Settings page appears.

  40. Review the settings listed, and then click Next.
  41. The wizard configures this computer for home networking, including sharing your Internet connection, turning on the Internet firewall, sharing printers, and sharing the Shared Documents folder.

    When the wizard is finished, the You're Almost Done page appears.

  42. Click Next to finish the Network Setup Wizard.
  43. The Completing The Network Setup Wizard page appears.

  44. Click Finish to close the wizard.

IMPORTANT:
Keep in mind that for other computers to be able to access the Internet, the computer that's the Internet Connection Sharing host must be turned on.

Keeping Your Network's Existing Security Features

Even though Windows XP comes with a variety of security features (described in Chapter 5, "Securing Your Home Network") and Internet Connection Sharing, you might already have set up a home network with these features. For example, you might have set up a firewall or gateway that you would like to continue using. In addition, although it's not recommended, you might decide to continue using a non–Windows XP computer as the Internet Connection Sharing host on your home network.

To add a Windows XP computer to a network that uses a gateway, run the Network Setup Wizard, and click Next until you see the Select A Connection Method page:

(Image Unavailable)

Select the This Computer Connects To The Internet Through Another Computer On My Network option, and click Next. Then follow the wizard's instructions.

Adding Users to Your Windows XP Computer

If more than one person will be using your Windows XP computer, you should create a separate user account for each person. Each user account has the following personalized settings:
  • Unique My Documents folder
  • List of favorite Web sites
  • List of recently viewed Web pages
  • Personalized display settings, including wallpaper and screen saver

TIP:
Another handy feature of user accounts is fast user switching. When fast user switching is activated, Windows will not close any programs that are running when you log off. This feature is useful if, for example, another person wants to use the computer while you take a short break. When you return to the computer and log back on, your desktop appears exactly as it was before. To turn on fast user switching, on the Start menu click Control Panel, and then click User Accounts. In the Pick A Task list, click Change The Way Users Log On Or Off. Select the Use Fast User Switching check box, and then click Apply Options.

Windows XP allows you to create two types of user accounts, depending on your needs. These accounts are:

  • Computer Administrator   A user with a Computer Administrator account can change any computer settings, install programs and hardware, make system-wide changes, gain access to all private files on the computer, create and delete user accounts, change other users' accounts, change his or her own account type, and change the logon picture associated with the account. The accounts created during the Windows XP setup process are Computer Administrator accounts.
  • Limited   A user with a Limited account can gain access to any program installed on the computer and can change his or her password and desktop settings, but he or she cannot make potentially damaging changes to the computer system. For example, a user with a Limited account cannot install programs and hardware, make system-wide changes, gain access to private files, create and delete user accounts, change other people's accounts, change his or her own account type, or change the picture associated with the account.

In addition, anyone can log on and use your Windows XP computer with a third type of account, guest. A user with a guest account can access programs that have already been installed on the computer, but he or she cannot change any system or user account settings. This account is ideal for someone who, for example, needs only temporary access to use the computer to surf the Web but doesn't need to be able to remove or install hardware or adjust user accounts.


IMPORTANT:
User accounts work on only one Windows XP computer. They do not apply to all the computers on your home network. A user account that you create on one Windows XP computer will not automatically be created on other computers on the network.

In this exercise, you're logged on to the Windows XP computer with a Computer Administrator account. You'd like to add an account so that your daughter can use the computer and personalize her settings. To make sure that she can't change any system settings but can still gain access to all the programs installed on the computer, you decide to give her a Limited account. To do this, complete the following steps:

  1. On the Start menu, click Control Panel.
  2. Control Panel appears.

  3. Click User Accounts.
  4. The User Accounts screen appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  5. In the Pick A Task list, click Create A New Account.
  6. The Name The New Account screen appears:

    (Image Unavailable)

  7. Type a name for the account—perhaps the first name of the person who will be using the account—and then click Next.
  8. The Pick An Account Type screen appears.

  9. Select the Limited option, and then click Create Account.

TIP:
To improve security on your computer, you can change the Welcome screen so that user names are not shown. This makes it more difficult for an intruder to guess a user name and password and thereby gain access to the computer. It also requires users to know the correct spelling of their user account names as well as their passwords. To change this setting, on the User Accounts screen, click Change The Way Users Log On Or Off. Then on the Select Logon And Logoff Options screen, clear the Use The Welcome Screen check box.

Chapter Wrap-Up

If you are continuing to the next exercise:

  • Close any open windows before continuing.

If you are not continuing to other exercises:

  • If you are finished using your computer for now, log off Windows.
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    What an awesome book

    This is the most complete book I have used of several to date. all my qustions were answered.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2003

    Failed When Needed Most

    I have a small network at home, four PC¿s, 2 with XP-Pro and 2 with Win 98 SE, all going through a Linksys router. Unfortunately when ever I needed a slightly in depth answer to a problem, the book never provided it. Every topic is dealt with in a cursory manner. Now I¿m forced to buy another book that really deals with home networking.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2003

    MUST READ PAGE BY PAGE-LITERALLY-THE BOOK FELL APART

    The book was a great help but after using it for just a few days, it started to fall apart in my hands. I never saw anything like it,this is not a cheap book, and it was like there was no glue holding the book together. Text is good, if you don't mind keeping your book in a bag, so you don't lose the pages. What a shame.

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