Home Ranch

Home Ranch

4.5 11
by Will James
     
 

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"Who in samhill was it said how the cowboy's life was so grand
and glorious?"

"I don't know, but I think it was the same feller who said
something about beautiful snow."

"Well, whoever it was has never pulled bog * and never rode in
wet snow."

* Getting cattle out of bog holes.

This kind of talk was going on between two…  See more details below

Overview

"Who in samhill was it said how the cowboy's life was so grand
and glorious?"

"I don't know, but I think it was the same feller who said
something about beautiful snow."

"Well, whoever it was has never pulled bog * and never rode in
wet snow."

* Getting cattle out of bog holes.

This kind of talk was going on between two cowboys. There was
about thirty feet of rope between em. One was on his horse at
one end of the rope and the other, the loop end in his hand, was
knee deep in sucking slushy black mud trying to find the horns of
a cow that had bogged down.

He wanted to put his loop end of the rope around them horns. The
cow had been fighting in trying to get out after having her
drink, and the sucking mud had got her deeper as she fought, till
only about half of her body showed. The cow being on the "prod"
(fight) as they usually are when bogged down that way had fought
at the sight of the two riders and tried to get at em, with the
result that she got on her side, throwed her head until, in her
struggling, she'd throwed it back and there she layed breathing
hard, both her horns stuck deep in the mud.

There wasn't a part of her showed where a loop could be throwed
so it would catch a hold. So there was nothing to do but for one
of the cowboys to wade in the mud, get her horns and place the
loop around em. Then as her head was straightened and she
struggled some more to get at the cowboy who was near her, the
other cowboy on the bank pulled with his horse, and all together
she was soon brought to solid ground, there to show her gratitude
only by trying to hook the men and horse that had saved her life.

But that's the nature of the range critter and the cowboys didn't
pay much attention to that, there'd been such doings all day
long. The cowboy who'd pulled her out rode safe of her horns
reach, left the slack of his rope drag, and as she run into it he
speeded his horse and the mad cow soon found herself upside down
to lay.

By that time the other cowboy had got on his horse, rode to where
the cow had been layed, took the rope off her head and rode on.
As the two looked back after they'd rode a ways, they seen that
the cow was up and shaking her horns at 'em but they was now too
far away for her to bother taking after 'em.

"Doggone it, Sol," says the cowboy who'd took the rope off the
cow, "I been in the mud three times today and here you are riding
high and dry as a mesquite bean."

The cowboy, Sol, grinned, "Shows that you re a better hand on
foot than you are on a horse," he says.

The two, riding along the creek, was headed for the ranch. Their
day's work was about done, for about half a mile ahead of 'em em
was the first fence surrounding the ranch and they didn't think
there'd be any more bogged cattle on the way to that fence, from
there on "inside" riders was doing the work.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780878424061
Publisher:
Mountain Press Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
08/28/1999
Series:
Tumbleweed Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
302
Product dimensions:
5.96(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.88(d)
Age Range:
9 Years

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Home Ranch 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Climbs up a scratching post and curls up into a tiny ball of yellow fur.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The tinykits run around
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*the tiny black and white kitten runs in the house and explores*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sits and watches tv
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When John B. Mitchell left Texas in a hurry with an "appropriated" herd of cattle, he headed north to create a ranch of his own. Fifty years later he owned the Seven X Ranch, a spread that was some sixty miles long and more than forty miles wide. The late Will James vividly recounts the story of life on the Seven X in this engaging western novel first published in 1935 -- a life of hard work, tough humor, and longtime friendship. The reader will join John Mitchell, his family and cowhands on the home ranch as they round up long horns, ride circle on the herd, and try in vain to keep tenderfeet from the city out of trouble.