Home Sweet Home: Around the House in the 1800s

Home Sweet Home: Around the House in the 1800s

by Zachary Chastain
     
 

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In rough frontier cabins, tidy farmhouses, and elegant townhouses, Americans in the 1800s were dedicated to living as well and as comfortably as their circumstances allowed. The American home was a sacred institution, the seat of family life where the patriarch ruled with Mother at his side as guardian of the home, and the children were raised with strict

Overview

In rough frontier cabins, tidy farmhouses, and elegant townhouses, Americans in the 1800s were dedicated to living as well and as comfortably as their circumstances allowed. The American home was a sacred institution, the seat of family life where the patriarch ruled with Mother at his side as guardian of the home, and the children were raised with strict discipline and strong values. Changes in taste & fashion, improvements in technology (indoor plumbing and a host of new labor-saving devices), and social change transformed home and family life in the 1800s, as opportunities for leisure activities and commercially produced consumer goods came within reach of the average American. But the strong American tradition of the sanctity of the home, consumerism, and the importance of the happy family life has its roots in the homes of nineteenth-century Americans.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ellen Welty
Americans who lived in the nineteenth century witnessed monumental changes in the world that affected every aspect of their lives, including their lives at home. The nineteenth century encompassed a period from the end of the Revolutionary War to the beginning of the modern age and included an enormous shift in the occupations of the citizens. The home at the beginning of the century was a place for the production of goods and by the end of the century it was a place for the consumption of goods. People no longer worked at home but rather in shops and factories outside of their homes. Part of the "Daily Life in America in the 1800s" series, this particular volume discusses how life at home changed. The topic is really too broad to cover in one volume and the information imparted is superficial. Readers wanting to learn about the home life of people of that time would need to find additional sources of information to fill in the gaps. There are many photographs and some added features such as eyewitness accounts, but there are also problems. In the first part of the book the author refers to the "Little House" books written by MARY Ingalls Wilder. Most readers in the intended audience for this book will note the error immediately and likely mistrust other information. Since that is such an easy fact to verify, the credibility of the volume and the series is suspect. While there is good information in the book, young readers will not be able to distinguish what is trustworthy and what is not. Teachers and librarians should purchase this with caution. Reviewer: Ellen Welty

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422218549
Publisher:
Mason Crest Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/2009
Series:
Daily Life in America in the 1800s Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.25(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
1110L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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