Home (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

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Overview

The Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Sula presents the story of embittered Korean War veteran Frank Money, who struggles against trauma and racism to rescue his medically abused sister and work through identity-shattering memories. Reprint. 100,000 first printing.

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Overview

The Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Sula presents the story of embittered Korean War veteran Frank Money, who struggles against trauma and racism to rescue his medically abused sister and work through identity-shattering memories. Reprint. 100,000 first printing.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780606270106
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/31/2013
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
  • Pages: 145
  • Product dimensions: 5.75 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Toni Morrison
Toni Morrison
Few contemporary novelists have achieved the venerated status of Toni Morrison. She has written adored modern classics like Beloved and Song of Solomon that daringly blend the supernatural and the natural with an uncommonly poetic eloquence. She is a recipient of both the Pulitzer Prize and the Noble Prize for Literature, and is truly one of America’s most gifted storytellers.

Biography

Toni Morrison has been called "black America's best novelist," and her incredible string of imaginative contemporary classics would suggest that she is actually one of America's best novelists regardless of race. Be that as it may, it is indeed difficult to disconnect Morrison's work from racial issues, as they lie at the heart of her most enduring novels.

Growing up in Lorain, Ohio, a milieu Jet magazine described as "mixed and sometimes hostile," Morrison experienced racism firsthand. (When she was still a toddler, her home was set on fire with her family inside.) Yet, her father instilled in her a great sense of dignity, a cultural pride that would permeate her writing. She distinguished herself in school, graduating from Howard and Cornell Universities with bachelor's and master's degrees in English; in addition to her career as a writer, she has taught at several colleges and universities, lectured widely, and worked in publishing.

Morrison made her literary debut in 1970 with The Bluest Eye, the story of a lonely 11-year-old black girl who prays that God will turn her eyes blue, in the naïve belief that this transformation will change her miserable life. As the tale unfolds, her life does change, but in ways almost too tragic and devastating to contemplate. On its publication, the book received mixed reviews; but John Leonard of The New York Times recognized the brilliance of Morrison's writing, describing her prose as "...so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry."

Over time, Morrison's talent became self-evident, and her reputation grew with each successive book. Her second novel, Sula, was nominated for a National Book Award; her third, 1977's Song of Solomon, established her as a true literary force. Shot through with the mythology and African-American folklore that informed Morrison's childhood in Ohio, this contemporary folktale is notable for its blending of supernatural and realistic elements. It was reviewed rapturously and went on win a National Book Critics Circle Award.

The culmination of Morrison's storytelling skills, and the book most often considered her masterpiece, is Beloved. Published in 1987 and inspired by an incident from history, this post-Civil War ghost story tells the story of Sethe, a former runaway slave who murdered her baby daughter rather than condemn her to a life of slavery. Now, 18 years later, Sethe and her family are haunted by the spirit of the dead child. Heartbreaking and harrowing, Beloved grapples with mythic themes of love and loss, family and freedom, grief and guilt, while excavating the tragic, shameful legacy of slavery. The novel so moved Morrison's literary peers that 48 of them signed an open letter published in The New York Times, demanding that she be recognized for this towering achievement. The book went on to win the Pulitzer Prize; and in 2006, it was selected by The New York Times as the single best work of American fiction published in the last 25 years.

In addition to her extraordinary novels, Morrison has also written a play, short stories, a children's book, and copious nonfiction, including essays, reviews, and literary and social criticism. While she has made her name by addressing important African-American themes, her narrative power and epic sweep have won her a wide and diverse audience. She cannot be dismissed as a "black writer" any more than we can shoehorn Faulkner's fiction into "southern literature." Fittingly, she received the Nobel Prize in 1993; perhaps the true power of her impressive body of work is best summed up in the Swedish Academy's citation, which reads: "To Toni Morrison, who, in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import, gives life to an essential aspect of American reality."

Good To Know

Chloe Anthony Wofford chose to publish her first novel under the name Toni Morrison because she believed that Toni was easier to pronounce than Chloe. Morrison later regretted assuming the nom de plume.

In 1986, the first production of Morrison's sole play Dreaming Emmett was staged. The play was based on the story of Emmett Till, a black teen murdered by racists in 1955.

Morrison's prestigious status is not limited to her revered novels or her multitude of awards. She also holds a chair at Princeton University.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Chloe Anthony Wofford (real name)
      Toni Morrison
    2. Hometown:
      Princeton, New Jersey, and Manhattan
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 18, 1931
    2. Place of Birth:
      Lorain, Ohio
    1. Education:
      Howard University, B.A. in English, 1953; Cornell, M.A., 1955

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 97 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(55)

4 Star

(19)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(7)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 97 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 3, 2012

    Masterful storytelling in a compact novel...

    Toni Morrison's latest novel (or novella) is a compact tale tackling the broad subject of "home". Frank Money is a veteran returns to the US after serving in the Korean War. Like most Black soldiers of that time, he's returning to a country that could care less about his service and the trauma that he's experienced. Frank works hard at trying to achieve some level of normalcy and overcome the memories that he can't escape. He receives news that his younger sister, Cee, is in trouble and must pull himself together enough to come to her aid.

    As usual, Morrison's writing is beautiful and descriptive, making even the smallest detail appear paramount to the story. It's hard to believe that a book that is only about 160 pages long could contain a wealth of storytelling. The plight of Black people in the 1950's is fully explored here: returning soldiers, travelling the country under Jim Crow laws, medical research exploitation, and much more. Morrison's incredible talent assures that no matter how many physical pages there are, her stories are always fully told.

    25 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 9, 2012

    A Web Spun with Words

    As usual, Toni Morrison does not disappoint in this her latest novel. I was pulled in immediately and unable to put the book down. So engrossed I was that I actually finished it in one sitting. It is not a long novel but it backs a great deal in its pages. Absolutely loved it.

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2012

    Home by Toni Morrison

    I had finished reading the latest novella by Toni Morrison titled "Home".
    Short reading but she tells a good story. An interesting and engaging plot that provides an exciting description of the main characters. Toni Morrison's stories are getting shorter but quality of writing still exists in her fiction. The plot engaged me from the start. I had finished reading this novella in three sessions. It goes on for 105 pages or so, not a very long story. Succinct and colorful, descriptive and enticing, draws you in from the very beginning. A well spent time reading this book. The twists and turns surprise and enchant. What happens at the end? I wanted the story to go on, but the writer decided to end the story. There is nothing we can do but carry on the plot in our own minds.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2012

    Tony Morrison strikes again

    Great read, compelling narrative, beautiful language.

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    Stop telling the story

    When I read reviews, I don't want to read a book report because it ruins any chance of me buying the book. Just say what you thought about it and leave it at that. Please!

    7 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 14, 2012

    Difficult to follow

    I was excited to read this book because I had heard of Toni Morrison but had never read any of her books. While the story was good, I found it at times hard to follow. The character's names changed, as well as the setting, without me being aware. It wasn't until I read the summary at the end that I understood that. Maybe upon reading again, I would enjoy it more, but I was disappointed.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Toni Morrison is a literary genius. "I can be miserable if

    Toni Morrison is a literary genius.

    "I can be miserable if I want to. You don't need to try and make it go away. It shouldn't go away. It's just as sad as it ought to be and I'm not going to hide from what's true just because it hurts." (from page 131)

    Why is it so hard to write about books that are so amazing? I always seem to have this issue with my favorite books. This is definitely the case with Toni Morrison's Home. Even though the novel is shy of 200 pages, the story inside it is so artfully crafted and brilliantly executed. The varying points of view and switch between first person and third person gives the reader different versions of the 'truth'.

    I've learned about eugenics in my women's studies classes. It's a horrible dark secret in American society that often gets overlooked or ignored. In a way, I am glad that Morrison decided to talk about this piece of history in her latest novel. I am disgusted that it happened, don't get me wrong, but I strongly believe in learning about any sort of discrimination. That's another reason why I admire Morrison so much. She links together all of the oppressions and shows how racism exists right along with sexism and classism. The voices of minorities have always been silenced, and there is great power in learning from the past. The other choice is to ignore it, but what does that do to a person?

    Frank is a perfect example of this. He may not be a perfect person, a perfect brother or boyfriend, but he is still human. He tries to ignore the past and it just haunts him and pulls him into a downward spiral. His post-traumatic stress is clear through his hallucinations and 'abnormal' reactions. When he finally says the truth, though, he is freed from that poisonous denial.

    I can't recommend this novel highly enough. If you love happy, care-free novels, then this isn't for you. You might say it's too depressing, too dark, too somber. But to her fans (like me) it is empowering and hopeful. The message here is really strong and inspiring. Nobody should make you feel like you're worth nothing. You might get discriminated against because of the color of your skin, or your gender, or the lack of money in your pockets, but those oppressors aren't better than you. No one is better than you. It takes a lot of courage to see that and accept it, but it's true.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2012

    Kevin

    * sits down*

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

    Yes pkease

    Stop telling the whole book In the reviews .
    T

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2012

    1 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2014

    Read

    Ms Morrison never fails! Gotta love it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2014

    Disappointing....

    Home is the story of siblings Frank and Ycidra "Cee" Money, who grow up underloved in a small Southern town. As adults, each of them leaves home--Frank as an enlisted man unprepared for the ravages of war and Cee as the wife of a despicable cad. Despite their hometown's impenetrable hardness and meanness, the siblings end up back there years later, gaining the healing they have been unwittingly delaying in refusing to come to terms with the place they have wanted so desperately to leave behind.

    Morrison fans will find plenty of her signature elements in Home: the small-town setting, childhood trauma, the collision of race and sex, love gone wrong, and the redemptive magic of women's love. In this way, Home is unquestionably the work of the Nobel Prize-winning master of American letters. However, aside from these authorial tells, the novel falls rather horribly flat, which is decidedly uncharacteristic of Morrison novels. While I confess to being underwhelmed by her novel Love, I stand by my assessment of Morrison as a giant in American literature. This notwithstanding, Home simply fails to satisfy. It is unrelentingly ungenerous in backstory and characterological inner life. This omniscient narrator is inexplicably tight-lipped. Things are somewhat better in this regard with Frank, the story's hero, but other characters, including his sister, the heroine, are given appallingly short shrift in these areas.

    One of the deep joys of reading Morrison is hearbreakingly beautiful language. Another is the invitation to gut-level understanding of who a character is and why his/her actions make absolute sense within a sharply drawn physical, emotional, and economic context. Home has so many interesting characters--the siblings' hardworking but perpetually impoverished parents, their resolutely unconcerned grandfather, their evil step-grandmother for whom the siblings and their parents can never be good enough, the woman who loves but is relieved ultimately to lose war-torn Frank, the kind but tragically unethical doctor who nearly kills the naive Cee, the stern women who pray, sing, and doctor her back to a self she has never known how to be, and others besides. Unfortunately, this overly terse novel renders them all as little more than one-dimensional stock characters, and not the living, breathing fictional people we experience in the overwhelming majority of other Morrison novels. Home is not a bad book, but it clearly should be so much more than it is and offer so much more than it does.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2014

    Trent

    Me too ttyt

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Another Morrison Success!

    If you're like me and have already read you fair share of Toni Morrison's work, you won't be disappointed with "Home." It is yet another wonderful book that is complex and rich in it's brevity.

    Morrison has always written as if she wrote 400+ pages and then edits down to 100 making the reader really have to immerse themselves into the text to really see what Morrison is trying to say.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2014

    Holt

    Dang it nooks almost dead

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2013

    Did not like this one.

    Highly over-rated in my humble opinion. Dis-jointed and fairy-tale like ending. Disappointed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    Gween

    Gween

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2013

    Ocean

    Sorry theres was a lag

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2013

    Great read

    Makes you realize that theres no place like home.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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