Homeland: David Hockney and the Yorkshire Landscape by James Cahill, Michael Lovell-Pank, Marina Vaizey | | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Homeland: David Hockney and the Yorkshire Landscape

Homeland: David Hockney and the Yorkshire Landscape

by James Cahill, Michael Lovell-Pank, Marina Vaizey
     
 

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Reviews 'David Hockney RA: A Bigger Picture', exhibited at the Royal Academy from January to April 2012. The project of creating monumental landscape paintings was based on a small area near the artist's home at Bridlington in East Yorkshire. Works developed with time-framed films, photographs, iPad studies, drawings, sketchbooks, oils and watercolours

Overview

Reviews 'David Hockney RA: A Bigger Picture', exhibited at the Royal Academy from January to April 2012. The project of creating monumental landscape paintings was based on a small area near the artist's home at Bridlington in East Yorkshire. Works developed with time-framed films, photographs, iPad studies, drawings, sketchbooks, oils and watercolours; recording particular motifs and places in the changing seasons. Studies were enlarged on joined canvases in compositions up to 30' wide, designed to immerse the viewer in an intense experience of the landscape. The monograph includes assessments of the oils, watercolours and drawings by James Cahill; the films, photo-collages, sketchbooks and iPad studies by Michael Lovell-Pank; and recent catalogues and books on the artist by Marco Livingstone, Martin Gayford and Christopher Simon Sykes, reviewed by Marina Vaizey.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781908419545
Publisher:
Cv Publications
Publication date:
09/05/2012
Series:
Cv/Visual Arts Research , #104
Sold by:
Bookwire
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
34
File size:
1 MB

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Read an Excerpt

Hockney's new landscape paintings are permeated by fluid - and at times unabashedly crude - brushwork, worthy of the fa presto ("work quickly") epithet conferred on Luca Giordano. Four works titled Three Trees near Thixendale (2008; showing the same scene in different seasons) demonstrate the alternate successes and failures of this 'late style'which seems better suited to 'seasonal extremes'.³ The dappled sky of the summer picture, for instance, vividly evokes what Derek Jarman called a "blue heat haze", and the trees' flecked foliage shares the balmy yet luminous coloration of David Inshaw's The Badminton Game (1972-3). But in the transitional phases of spring and autumn, the application of paint seems too uniformly impressionistic, with little differentiationbetween foreground and faraway slopes. By contrast, Hockney's extensive series of 'Hawthorn Blossom' paintings involves a dynamic and exhilarating alternation between impressionistic and graphic forms. These pieces brilliantly convey the bristling fecundity of nature:May Blossom on the Roman Road, (2009) distils shrubbery, sky and earth into a shimmering mass of "wave and corpuscle"; blossom teems across the bushes like larvae or seminal globules. Hockney here delves into a long English tradition of celebrating the sexuality of the countryside, as reflected by George Passmore's (of Gilbert & George's extolment of Samuel Palmer: "He saw the trees vibrating, the blossom spunking out.")James Cahill

Meet the Author

Marina Vaizey is an art critic, lecturer and traveller; her books include The Artist as Photographer, 100 Masterpieces of Art; Great Collectors. She was the art critic for the Financial Times for years, and The Sunday Times for eighteen. She has curated several many catalogues. She has been a Trustee several national museums. Her much loved Hockney print, bought in , now resides with her son in southeast Asia.

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