Homemade Fun

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Homemade Fun is Rae Grant's third charming family activity book. Like the previous books in the series, Homemade Fun offers a generous collection of classic activities for kids and families who enjoy making creative projects at home, paired with delightful vintage art throughout. Parents, especially moms who are juggling kids, time, and a budget, can use this book as a resource when looking for ways to enrich and entertain their kids. Featuring a versatile compilation of classic crafts, ...

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Homemade Fun: 101 Crafts and Activities to Do with Kids

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Overview

Homemade Fun is Rae Grant's third charming family activity book. Like the previous books in the series, Homemade Fun offers a generous collection of classic activities for kids and families who enjoy making creative projects at home, paired with delightful vintage art throughout. Parents, especially moms who are juggling kids, time, and a budget, can use this book as a resource when looking for ways to enrich and entertain their kids. Featuring a versatile compilation of classic crafts, games, and activities that are family and kid-oriented, the book can be used for many different situations including camp activities, after-school activities, birthday parties, rainy day events, and vacations as well.

Homemade Fun will provide hours of family fun!
--stitch a handy wallet
--build a tool box
--decorate a pillowcase
--make paper flowers
--bake pretzels
--decorate cupcakes
--have a pizza party
--hold a bubble race
plus so much more!

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Grant's (Crafting Fun, Cooking Fun) collection of craft projects that all kids should learn includes paper boats, button bracelets, and tin can bird feeders. The sewing and cooking projects are particularly good and suitable for girls and boys. A worthwhile purchase, even for collections with Grant's previous books." --Library Journal

"Homemade Fun is a great book to have around when you're looking to give your kids a creative alternative to incessant TV viewing. This compilation of classic crafts, games, and activities can be used to entertain kids at birthday parties, scout meetings, or in your own back yard. From paper lanterns to moon journals and button bracelets, this book will remind you to teach the kids in your life the crafts you did back in your day." --Grand Rapids Press"Rae Grant understands the modern family's desire to live a simpler life. This is a must-have book on every family's shelves for the years to come." --Pardis Amirshahi, editor of Living Crafts magazine

"In a time when our children can be lost on the information highway, Rae Grant has created a way to stop and get off. Homemade Fun offers families a way back to that delightful world called imagination." --Peggy Stern, Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker
 
Praise for Rae Grant's previous book:

"Crafting Fun is a hands-on, hands-down winner. Projects are simple and straightforward, and will entertain your children for hours." --Parenthood.com blog

Library Journal
Grant's (Crafting Fun; Cooking Fun) collection of craft projects that all kids should learn includes paper boats, button bracelets, and tin can bird feeders. The sewing and cooking projects are particularly good and suitable for girls and boys. A worthwhile purchase, even for collections with Grant's previous books.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312610777
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 6/8/2010
  • Pages: 144
  • Product dimensions: 9.42 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

RAE GRANT  is a book designer, collage illustrator, and author. Her background in fine letterpress, printing, and bookmaking established her reputation for designing high-quality illustrated books. Rae lives in Manhattan with her daughter and husband. Her previous books are Crafting Fun and Cooking Fun.

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Read an Excerpt

Homemade Fun

101 Crafts and Activities to Do with Kids
By Rae Grant

St. Martin's Griffin

Copyright © 2010 Rae Grant
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312610777

Homemade Fun
Hand Sewing and EmbroideryHand Sewing and EmbroideryRecycled Containers Sewing Equipment Sewing Terms Repurposing Good Stuff to Repurpose Rules for Hand Sewing Threading a Needle Masking a Knot Running Stitch Backstitch Creasing and Hemming Buttons Useful Embroidery Stitches Up-and-Down Stitch Straight Stitch Flower Stem Stitch Satin Stitch Blanket Stitch Crisscross Stitch Chain Stitch French Knot Jelly Jar Lid Pin Cushion Bluebird Ornament Lunch Money Wallet Embroidered Pillowcase Placemat Roll-Up Pouch Washcloth Puppet Tooth Fairy Pillow Soft Toy BunnyRecycled ContainersEveryday containers can be reused for storing your sewing supplies. Before you buy anything from the store, check in the cupboards and closets for useful throwaways. Look around your house for some of the containers listed below. Be sure to rinse and clean tins before using.Berry boxes (wooden or cardboard) Baking powder tins Biscuit and cookie tins Candy and gum tins Cardboard cheese containers with lids Cardboard oatmeal containers with lids Drawstring bags Lidded candy boxes Plastic or metal toolbox Shoeboxes with lids (adult or kid-size) Small orange crates Soap boxes Straw baskets with lids Tea tins and small tea boxesSewing EquipmentFor the projects in this book, you will need the following supplies:Buttons, eyelets, and snaps Clear plastic ruler Cloth tape measure Craft scissors for cutting paper Embroidery floss Embroidery hoops (two 6-inch, either wooden or plastic) Hand-sewing needles (size 6 or 7 sharps and large wide-eye needles) Non-sharp metal or plastic blunted needle Pencils with erasers for marking sewing linesPinking shears (optional) Sewing basket or other recycled containers Sharp scissors for cutting fabric Small magnet for picking up stray pins Straight pins (large, colored-head pins are easier to handle) Safety pins Thimble (metal or plastic) Thread (good quality brand name in off-white or gray) Water-soluble marking pensSewing TermsFabric: Cloth or material woven from cotton, wool, linen, or silk. Soft cotton cloth (like muslin) is best for a beginner.Selvage: The finished edge that runs lengthwise on a piece of fabric. It will not fray or unravel.Raw edge: The edge of the fabric that is cut or torn.Warp and weft: These are the threads of the cloth. The threads running lengthwise are the warp threads, and those running across from selvage to selvage are the weft. The warp is usually stronger than the weft.Folded Edge: The edge made by doubling one part of the cloth over the other.Wrong side: The side of the fabric that faces in when you wear a garment.Right side: The side of the fabric that faces out when you wear a garment.TIPWash and dry fabric before using to prevent shrinking.To tear a piece of cloth, make a 1-inch cut into the cloth. Holding the corner of each cut between the thumb and forefinger of each hand, pull the edges away from you and tear carefully.RepurposingTo repurpose an item is to take something old, like a shirt, and reuse it to make a new item. It's an old tradition and a good habit to practice when starting any craft project. Not only is it environmentally friendly to recycle as much as we can, it's also fun and challenging to create something new from a favorite old shirt or pair of pants. The very best place for you to look for material to repurpose is right in your own home, maybe even in your closet or dresser. It's a little like a treasure hunt--there's no telling what old and useful things you might find. Be sure to check with your parents before cutting anything.Good Stuff to RepurposeAprons Burlap Baby blankets, cotton or fleece Cotton clothing Dish towels Denim jeans Felt scraps Flannel pajamas Fleece clothing Flour sacks Handkerchiefs or bandanas Men's shirts with cuffs Napkins or dish towels Pillowcases or sheets Placemats Ribbon and string Socks Tablecloths Washcloths or bath towelsRules for Hand Sewing1 . Work with clean hands to avoid getting dirt or smudges on the fabric. Do not put any sewing material or equipment in your mouth!2. Always sew with a thimble on the index or middle finger of the opposite hand holding the needle. Use it to push the eye-end of the needle through the fabric or to protect your finger when pushing the needle through fabric.3. Avoid eye strain by working ill a room with plenty of natural daylight or good lighting. It is best to sit in a sturdy chair with your sewing basket nearby.4. When passing scissors or anything sharp to someone, be sure the tips are closed and the pointy side is facing down. This will prevent any accidental poking and pricks.5. Protect your scissors by keeping them closed and stored in a small fabric case or a Placemat Roll-Up Pouch when not in use.TIPMake a Jelly Jar Lid Pin Cushion for storing pins and needles,Threading a NeedleA needle is a small piece of steel with a point on one end and a small opening on the other end. This opening is called the eye of the needle. Store your needles in Jelly Jar Lid Pin Cushion or a needle case. 
1. Measure and cut a length of thread about 12 inches. This length will help you manage the thread as you sew and prevent tangling and knots. Before threading your needle, snip off one end of your thread to make it even and smooth. This will allow you poke it through the eye of the needle more easily.2. Next, hold the needle between the thumb and forefinger of your left hand. with the eye of the needle sitting a little above your pinched fingers. Moisten the tip of the thread to a point and then poke it through the eye of the needle. Pull the thread through about 3 inches and make a knot in the other end.TIPIf you are having trouble threading your needle try holding the needle and thread above a white sheet of paper near a light.Making a KnotTo make a knot at the end of your thread, wrap the end around your index finger once or twice. Loosen the wrap a little hit and slip the loop off your finger. Slip the top end of the thread through the small loop and pull.Running StitchThis sturdy stitch is used to make a seam to hold two pieces of fabric together. The running stitch is made by running or weaving the needle in and out of the fabric using small, even stitches. (The stitches do not overlap.) 
1. To practice a Running Stitch, draw a line on a piece of fabric. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Take a small stitch down and run your needle underneath the fabric along the lime you have drawn.3. Push the needle up from the other side just in front of the last stitch. Continue this method of going up and down in small stitches along your line.4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back or the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end hack through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.TIPWhen using this stitch for an embroidery project, experiment with different thicknesses of thread to decide which you like best for your project. A thin thread will make a light line and a thicker thread make a wider or bolder one.BackstitchUse a to make an extra strong seam. This stitch can also be used to make bold or delicate lines when embroidering. 
1. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Poke the Needle up through the back of the fabric until the knot tugs against the fabric. Make one small stitch to the right of where your Needle came up.2. Next, weave the needle forward so it is in front of your starting point, about the length of a small stitch, and pull the needle all the way through (Figure 1).3. Repeat as above. Go back towards your last stitch. Poke the needle down through the fabric, just in front of the last stitch. Pull the needle all the way through and begin the next stitch. Continue stitching the length of the line (Figure 2).4. When you come to the end. take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Creasing and HemmingTo hem is to turn fabric under in two small folds and sew the folded edge to the under layer. It is used for many of the sewing projects in this book. 
1. A crease is made by folding the fabric and pressing along the edge with your thumbnail until a line is made. To prepare the hem, you will need to crease the fabric First, fold the edge of the fabric down 1/2 inch and crease it well, then fold the fabric down another 1/2 inch and crease again.2. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Starling at one end of your project, poke the needle underneath the fold and pull it up through the folded edge until the knot tugs against the fabric (Figure 1). Tuck the knot under the edge using the point or the needle.3. Point the needle into the fabric on a slant to take up two threads from the under layer and then through the fabric on the folded edge. Keep the needle on a slanted line pointing towards the left shoulder (Figure 2).4. Continue making close and slanting stitches through all layers until you reach the end of the folded edge (Figure 3). When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.ButtonsAt some point you will lose a button from your clothing and will want to repair it. Sew-through buttons are the most common type of button. They are flat with two or four holes, But buttons aren't only for practical things, they can also be used as decoration on fabric patches and small pillows. 
1. Mark the oil the fabric where you want your button to go will a straight pin. (If you are mending you can usually find the old hole.)2. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Starting at A Figure 1 , pull the needle up through the hack of the spot you have marked and place your button on the needle. Slide it to the end of the thread, against the fabric.3. Next, poke the needle down through the second hole B (Figure 1) and into the fabric. Repeat the A B step twice, and bring the needle back up through C and then down through D (Figure 2). Repeat the C-D steps twice. Finish with your needle under the button and tie the thread in a knot. Your stitches will have formed the letter "X" on the surface of the button.TIPTo sew on two-hole buttons first pull the needle up through the first button hole then weave the end back down through the second hole (see Button Bracelet). Repeat threading through the hole twice and then finish as above.See a pin and pick it up, All the day you'll have good luck; See a pin and let it lay, Bad luck you'll have all the day. A Nursery RhymeUseful Embroidery StitchesUp-and-Down StitchThe Up-and-Down Stitch (also know as a running straight stitch) is easy to learn and can be used to make simple creative designs. Use it to embroider a small decorative flower on fabric or sew two pieces of fabric together. 
1. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Poke the needle up through the hack of the fabric until the knot tugs against the fabric (Figure 1).2. Next, poke the needle down along the design or seam line (Figure 2). Pull the needle down through the fabric and then poke it up just in front of the last stitch. Continue going up and down along the line until you have reached the end of the fabric.3. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Straight Stitch flowerTrace or draw a flower on your sample fabric to practice making flowers with the straight stitch. 
1 . Use a pencil lo draw a flower on fabric (Figure 1).2. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. At the outside end of one drawn line, poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the needle through until the knot tugs against the fabric (Figure 1).3. Next. position the needle at the inside end of the drawn line and poke down into the fabric. Weave your needle from underneath the end point, and come up at the beginning of the next inside line (Figure 2). Pull the thread lightly so that it lies flat on the line. (If it is a little twisted flatten it out with your fingers.) Take your needle to the back end point of the line and continue stitching until you finish.4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch. but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before dipping any extra thread.Stem StitchThe stem stitch is good for outlining curves, and stems, The stitches are always sewn at a slant.1. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Make a Straight Stitch from point A to B. Point the needle back towards point A and insert through the fabric at point B, then come through at point C (Figure 1). Pull the thread through gently.3. Next, take the needle back ¼ inch from your last stitch. Insert the needle through the fabric at point D and come back up through the fabric just right of the B hole (Figure 2). Repeat the same steps as described and continue stitching to the next point, keeping the tension even and the stitches the same length (Figure 3).4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Satin StitchThe Satin Stitch is used to fill in designs for leaves, stems, and flower petals. Use four to six strands of embroidery floss when working with this stitch. Be sure the fabric is tight in your embroidery hoop. This will help you make firm stitches.1. Draw a leaf shape design (Leaf Art Journal) onto your fabric.2. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.3. Starting on the left side, come up at A and go down at B, making a Straight Stitch the width of your leaf shape. Next, come up at C. Continue to sew the straight stitches close together across the leaf design. (You don't want to see the fabric peeking through between the stitches.) Work slowly and don't try to cover too large an area or the stitches will not fill in the shape tightly.4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Blanket StitchThe Blanket Stitch is used for finishing edges of fabric. You will start to see the stitch take shape after two or three stitches. If it doesn't look right, then start again or try to correct your practice stitch by reviewing the directions. This stitch is used for many of the projects in this book. 
1. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Next, poke the needle down through the fabric right next to the first stitch (Figure 1). Bring your needle up from underneath, making sure the point of the needle goes across the top of the loop. Pull gently to make the loop snug on the edge of the fabric (Figures 2).3. Bring the needle back the same distance as your last stitch and push the needle down through the fabric and come up across the top of the loop. Continue on in even stitches until you reach the end (Figure 3).4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, hut don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Crisscross StitchThe Crisscross Stitch is made up of two straight stitches that form an X. You can make letters, borders and elaborate pictures using this basic stitch.1. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot.2. Starting at the bottom right corner A, poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.3. a diagonal stitch to the upper left hand corner and insert your needle at B. Pull the thread through gently and then bring it up at C.4. Make another diagonal stitch from C to the lower-left corner D. You will cross over the top of the first A-B stitch. Pull the thread through gently and continue making a row of stitches. When you come to the end, take the thread to the hack of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.TIPTo make a row of stitches, remember to always start in the lower-right corner of each square and end in the lower-left corner.Chain StitchThe Chain Stich makes a line of loops that resemble a tiny chain. Use it to outline a shape, border, or your name, Once you master making the first two loops the rest is really easy!1. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Hold the thread against the fabric with your thumb. Insert the needle back through the fabric next to the first stitch hole. Push the point of the needle down then weave back up. Your needle tip will cross over the top of the thread. Pull the thread gently to form the loop Figure 1).3. To make another loop, hold the thread with your thumb. Push the needle down through the fabric just inside the front of last loop and bring it hack up. Pull the needle across the top of the thread to make the next loop Figure 2). (Continue to make loops in this way until you reach the end of your line (Figure 3).4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.French KnotThese little knots make perfect eyes for a Washcloth Puppet or the center of a flower. They can also be used to make a pattern of polka dots. The number of wraps around the needle will determine the size of your knot. It may take several tries to get this right so be sure to practice this stitch. 
1. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Wind the thread around tip of the needle twice (Figure 1).3. Hold the thread firmly against the needle with your left hand and poke the needle down through the fabric close to the same spot where you came up (Figure 2). Push the needle back into the fabric while holding the knot tightly in place under your thumb. (Be careful not to go through the same hole because the knot might slip through.) Bring your needle up through the fabric just to the left side of your last knot and continue (Figure 3).Jelly Jar Lid Pin CushionThe lid and screw-on band from a canning jar can he transformed into a cute pin cushion.MATERIALS NEEDEDFelt and fabric scraps Lid and screw-on band (from a canning jar) Jumbo cotton balls Pencil Scissors White glue1. Lay fabric scrap, right side facing down, on the tabletop, Set the jar lid on top or the fabric and trace the circle. Remove lid. Draw another circle about 1 inch wider than the first circle onto the fabric and cut out (Figure 1). Next, trace the jar lid onto the felt and cut out the circle. Set aside for later use.2. To make the pincushion mound, place the screw-on band, top side down, on the work surface. Next, set the fabric, right side down, into the band. Stack four to five jumbo cotton balls on top of the fabric to make a small fluffy "mound". Set the flat metal lid on top of the cotton balls and press firmly into the band (Figure 2). The fabric edges will push out from underneath the lid. Push the layers gently against the screw-on band until the lid is snug against the band and the mound pops through on the other side (Figure 3).3. Dab glue on the inside edges of the fabric circle and press firmly, glue side down, until the fabric lies flat against the lid. To finish, dab glue onto one side of the felt circle. Set it inside the band, glued side down, on top of the fabric. Press well. Turn right side up and let dry.Blue Bird OrnamentMake a classic bird-shaped ornament using the Blue Bird template or draw your own picture and shape. Young children can use a shoelace to practice sewing their ornament.MATERIALS NEEDEDTracing paper or lightweight brown bag Scissors Tape Lightweight cardboard (cereal boxes) colorful card stock Pencil Hole punch Large-eye needle Embroidery floss, or yarn, about 12 inches long1. Assemble all materials on your work surface. Use a pencil to trace the bird-shaped template onto tracing paper. Cut out the shape to use as a pattern.2. Tape the pattern to the cardboard or cardstock and trace the shape again. Remove the pattern from the cardboard or cardstock and set aside. Use scissors to cut out the shape. Make evenly spaced holes along the outside edge of your shape using the hole punch.3. Thread needle with colorful floss or yarn and tie the end in a knot. Working from the top left, pull the thread up from underneath the first hole. Bring the needle over the edge and come hack up again through the same hole. This will secure the knot and keep the stitching from unraveling.4. Insert needle down into the next hole. Continue sewing around the entire shape. When you come to the end, weave the thread through the last stitch and tie in a firm knot. Clip the ends with scissors.TIPThread a thin ribbon or string through one of the holes on the top of the ornament to form a loop. Tie the ends in a knot or bow and hang in the window.Lunch Money WalletMake a wallet to store your lunch money and library card.MATERIALS NEEDEDPencil Ruler Tracing paper Pins Scissors 8-by-3¼-inch felt or fleece Large-eye needle Embroidery floss, about 18 inches long Two buttons Thin ribbon or string, about 4 inches long1. Assemble all materials on your work surface. Use a pencil and ruler to trace the template on tracing paper (Figure 1). Pin pattern to felt and cut out the shape.2. Use ruler to measure 61/2 inches up from the bottom on both edges of the rectangle. Mark each point with your pencil. Use ruler and pencil to connect the two points.3. Fold the bottom edge up to the pencil line and crease well along the bottom to make a fold (Figure 2). Pin sides together to form a pocket. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Make a Blanket Stitch around the sides and top flap, sewing all the way around the wallet. When you come to the end. take the thread to the back of the fabric for the list stitch. but down come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching. Clip extra thread. Remove pins.4. Next, Blanket Stitch along the top edge of the pocket (be careful not to stitch the pocket shut!).Secure the thread as above.5. To make a flap, fold down the top single layer of the fabric over the pocket crease well. (The flap will overlap the top edge of the pocket.) Next, find your center point on the top edge of the folded flap. Center the button top to bottom on the flap and mark that point with your pencil. Unfold and turn fabric over (pocket side down). Poke your threaded needle up from the bottom, through the center of the mark. Place button on the needle and sew on firmly. Fold flap down again.6. Center the second button on the pocket about 1 inch below the flap and mark that point with your pencil. The buttons should be lined up. This time, bring the threaded needle up through the inside of the pocket and sew the second button on firmly (Buttons).7. To make a tie, wrap one end of the string around the top button and tie in a knot to secure. Crisscross the string around the bottom button and then wrap twice around the top button to close and secure wallet.Embroidered PillowcaseMake a sampler pillowcase using a variety of Useful Embroidery Stitches. The Straight Stitch Flower, and the Blue Bird are all good beginning embroidery drawings to trace and stitch.MATERIALS NEEDEDPencil One sheet of tracing paper Soft lead pencil White cotton pillowcase Needle Embroidery floss (assorted colors)1. Use a pencil to trace or draw a simple design onto the tracing paper. To transfer a design, set the illustrated side of the paper face down on a hard surface. Using a soft lead pencil, rub over the back of the drawing until it is completely covered with a layer of pencil marks.2. Next, determine where to place your design on the fabric. Set the tracing paper, pencil-rubbed side facing down, in position. Use a pencil to retrace the design onto the fabric. Press down lightly as you trace. The pressure from the pencil will transfer the image onto the fabric.) When finished, remove paper. Check that the traced pattern has been transferred to the pillowcase.3. Choose from Useful Embroidery Stitches to embroider your drawing as you wish. When you have finished stitching, wash fabric in cold soapy water to remove any smudges from the tracing paper or pencil. Pat dry in a towel and hang to dry.Placemat Roll-Up PouchA repurposed placemat makes a handy roll-up pouch in no time at all. Use to store art supplies, a small notebook, pencils and paints, maps, or even small dolls and little treasures.MATERIALS NEEDED14-by-19-inch fabric placemat (medium weight) Pins Large-eye needle Heavy thread Pencil Scissors 1-inch wide ribbon, about 24 inches long1. Assemble all materials on your work surface. Set placemat in front of you lengthwise. The right side of the fabric will be facing down.2. To make a pouch, bring the bottom edge of the placemat up about % of the length of the rectangle (Figure 1). Crease the bottom fold and pin each side together. Back Stitch, the edges together in small, tight stitches. Remove pins when done. You will have a sewn one long pouch with an opening (Figure 2).3. To make four smaller pockets, fold the bag in half and crease the outside edge firmly. Fold in half again and crease the outer edge firmly, then unfold the entire placemat. You will have four equal creases across the placemat (Figure 3). Use pencil to draw a light line along each crease.4. Starting at the bottom. sew along each crease line using the Running Stitch ). Make small steady stitches until you reach the top of the pocket. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch. but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread. (You will have four pockets.)5. To make ribbon tie: Fold the ribbon in half. Pin the folded end of the ribbon onto one side edge of the placemat. Place it halfway up from the bottom (Figure 4). Use the running stitch to secure the ribbon to the mat. Starting with the side without the ribbon, fold or roll-up the pouch. Wrap the ends of the ribbon around and tie both ends in a bow. Your roll-up pouch is ready to use!Washcloth PuppetUse two clean washcloths to make a puppet for the bathtub. Trace the frog face template or draw your own simple face.MATERIALS NEEDEDPencil Tracing paper or lightweight brown bag Two washcloths Pins Scissors Embroidery hoop Large-eye needle Embroidery floss or heavy thread1. Assemble all materials on your work surface. Use a pencil to trace the pattern onto tracing paper.2. Place washcloths together and carefully pin the pattern to the top of the fabric. Use scissors to cut out two identical shapes. Remove pins and tracing paper. Set one washcloth aside.3. Use a pencil to draw or trace the frog face (fig. 15)onto one washcloth. Set washcloth firmly in an embroidery hoop and secure. Thread your needle with floss and tie the end in a knot. Use the Running Stitch), to outline the face and mouth. Embroider the eyes with the Satin Stitch). Make the nose using French knot. When you have finished. remove washcloth from the embroidery hoop.4. To assemble puppet: Pin the two washcloths together, with the embroidered side facing in. Use the Running Stitch to sew the sides and top edges in firm, even stitches. Hem the bottom along both bottom edges to prevent fraying. When you are finished, turn the fabric right side out and try on your hand puppet!Toothfairy PillowThis little pillow is the perfect size for a lost tooth and a note to the tooth fairy:MATERIALS NEEDEDPencil Ruler Two pieces of 4-by-5-inch felt or heavy cotton (any color) Scissors One piece of 3-by-3-inch felt (any color) Pins Large-eye needle Embroidery floss, about 12 inches long A bag of jumbo cotton balls or cotton batting1. Assemble all materials on your work surface. Use a Pencil and ruler to draw 4-by-5-inch shapes on the larger piece of felt or fabric.2. Use scissors to cut around the outlines to make two matching pieces. Set aside.3. To make a tooth pocket: Measure and cut a 2-inch heart from the smaller piece of felt. Place the pocket heart in the center of the larger piece. Pin the heart in place.4. Next, thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Using the Running Stitch , insert needle from the hack and come up at the top left of the heart. Sew down along the left side of the heart in small even stitches, until you reach the top right side. (Be careful not to stitch the pocket shut!) When you come to the end, take the thread over for the last stitch and come up again. Weave the thread through the stitch and tie in a firm knot. Clip ends with scissors.5. To make your pillow: Pin the front and back of the larger pieces together with the right sides facing out. Use the Running Stitch to sew along the sides and bottom edge in small, even stitches. Leave a wide opening at the top for your stuffing.6. Gently stuff the pillow by pushing the cotton balls in through the opening with a pencil. Once the pillow is tightly stuffed sew the top closed. When you come to the end, take the thread over for the last stitch and come up again. Weave the thread through the stitch and tie in a firm knot. Clip ends with scissors. Place tooth in heart pocket and hide it under your pillow before you go to sleep.TIPIf you would like for your pillow to have a pleasant smell, dust a teaspoon of scented talcum powder over the cotton balls before stuffing.Soft Toy BunnyThis is the perfect beginner sewing project. Denim fabric from old jeans is a good fabric to use. It is soft, durable, and easy to stitch.MATERIALS NEEDEDPencil Tracing paper or lightweight brown bag Pins Two pieces of 9-by-5-inch denim Scissors Large-eye needle Embroidery floss or heavy yarn Thin ribbon A bag of jumbo cotton balls or cotton batting1. Assemble all materials on your work surface. Use a pencil and tracing paper to outline the pattern of the bunny (Figure 1). Cut out the shape and pin the pattern onto both pieces of fabric. Use scissors to carefully cut around the shape.2. With right sides facing out, pin the wrong side of fabric pieces together at the top, center, and bottom. Leave an opening for stuffing the pillow along one side.3. Thread a needle with embroidery floss or heavy yarn. Using the Blanket Stitch , sew the pieces together in even stitches (Figure 2). Gently pack small amounts of stuffing as you sew around the edges (Figure 3).4. When the bunny is stuffed, stitch the opening shut. When you come to the end, take the thread over for the last stitch and come up again. Weave the thread through the stitch and tie in a firm knot. Clip ends with scissors. If you like, tie a colorful ribbon around the bunny's neck.HOMEMADE FUN. Copyright © 2010 by Rae Grant. All rights reserved.

Continues...

Excerpted from Homemade Fun by Rae Grant Copyright © 2010 by Rae Grant. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2014

    #Likeaboss

    Lolfun

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    Mhxgc

    Bhcffefiidhidhfh

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    What a treat to see a book like this.

    What a treat to see a book like this.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    Pretty Awesome! :)

    That Book was Sweet! :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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