Homer, the Library Cat

( 2 )

Overview

When a quietloving cat takes an unexpected tour of the neighborhood, he's in for some rude surprises—until he discovers the purrfect solution.

Homer is a very quiet cat. He lives in a very quiet house with a very quiet lady. But one day, while the lady is away, Homer hears a very loud sound, and out the window he goes! Poor Homer just wants to find a spot where he can curl up and be quiet, but his hometown is a surprisingly loud place. Will Homer find a bit of calm in all the ...

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Overview

When a quietloving cat takes an unexpected tour of the neighborhood, he's in for some rude surprises—until he discovers the purrfect solution.

Homer is a very quiet cat. He lives in a very quiet house with a very quiet lady. But one day, while the lady is away, Homer hears a very loud sound, and out the window he goes! Poor Homer just wants to find a spot where he can curl up and be quiet, but his hometown is a surprisingly loud place. Will Homer find a bit of calm in all the noise? And will he ever find his quiet lady? Reeve Lindbergh's cheerful, rhyming text pairs with Anne Wilsdorf's charming illustrations for a story-lover's ode to everyone's favorite quiet place.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A loud noise sets in motion an unexpected adventure for Homer, a quiet cat accustomed to living in a quiet house with a quiet lady. When the woman leaves the house (as she does each day), Homer’s typically peaceful routine is interrupted by a startling crash that sends him leaping out of the window. He wanders through town searching for a cozy spot; it proves a challenge, resulting in funny scenes in which Homer tries to find a measure of peace at the fire station and train yard. At last, he finds an open door and a quiet building—the library—where he recognizes a familiar voice. Lindbergh’s (My Little Grandmother Often Forgets) rhyming text is upbeat and rhythmic without being too bouncy, a quality that matches the personality of the title character. Wilsdorf’s (Thelonious Mouse) tiger-striped Homer has a sweet smile, expressive eyes, and a penchant for lounging that make him the perfect companion and a welcome guest at his owner’s place of employ. Scenes of a quaint, Victorian-looking village rendered in watercolor, ink, and collage keep Homer’s outing entertaining rather than harrowing. Ages 4–8. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
Lindbergh's rhyming text is upbeat and rhythmic without being too bouncy, a quality that matches the personality of the title character. Wilsdorf's tiger-striped Homer has a sweet smile, expressive eyes, and a penchant for lounging that make him the perfect companion and a welcome guest at his owner's place of employ.
—Publishers Weekly
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Orange-and-black-striped Homer looks a lot like a tiger, but actually he is a pussycat. From author Lindbergh's deftly constructed rhymes; listeners learn that Homer is a cat who treasures the quiet life he shares with a quiet lady who leaves him alone each day to enjoy his peaceful amusements in a serenely quiet house. CRASH! One day, Homer's peace is shattered; he jumps out the window and sets noisy trashcans rolling. Viewers can follow Homer's frantic search for quiet as he leaps in and out of a busy post office, a huge red ladder truck rushing to a fire, and a (beautifully painted) boxcar at the railroad terminal, ending finally in an elegant lobby with a palm-topped ottoman at its quiet center. His final leap takes him into the arms of his quiet lady, who is, kids will be delighted to discover, a librarian reading to rapt children. The busy, colorful children's library and the boys and girls who immediately take to Homer are wittily portrayed in Wilsdorf's charming watercolor spreads. A final illustration focuses on a contented, nearly life-sized Homer reposing on a bookshelf strewn with volumes the illustrator has accented with bits of collaged graphics. What could make everyone happier than having Homer as the library cat? The big horizontal spreads and Lindbergh's lively text will make this a purrfect read-aloud, while the many amusing details can be chuckled at (quietly, of course) alone or with friends—the endpapers are fun, too. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—Homer enjoyed a quiet life, with his quiet lady, in his quiet house. It takes a noisy chain of events to lead him to the library. Once there, however, he is happy to give up his peaceful, solitary days for the hubbub of the children's room, which also happens to be where his quiet lady works. While the story lacks fluidity, it has a comedic energy that should appeal to children. Once Homer leaves the safety of his home, every new hiding spot seems to guarantee peace and security, but children will quickly realize that some new ruckus is waiting for both Homer and them with the turn of each page. Even though the library initially promises serenity, the fact that the children's room itself is not a quiet place is made clear by the activity in the watercolor and collage illustrations. Children are reaching for books, playing with toys—even the shelf on which Homer contentedly sleeps at the end is a jumble of ransacked books. But the presence of the quiet lady, reading to the children, provides a sense of calm that nicely counterbalances the children's energy and enthusiasm.—Kara Schaff Dean, Walpole Public Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews
Like many of his predecessors, the striped feline star of this story finds a happy home at his local library. The twist, this time around, is that Homer already has a home in a "quiet house" with a "quiet lady" when a loud noise startles him into jumping out the window. The action moves quickly, as Homer tries out the post office (too sneezy), the fire house (too busy) and a boxcar at the train station (too loud) as alternatives. He next dashes into the local library, where he's pleased and surprised to recognize his owner--and vice versa. A big hit with the kids, Homer winds up spending his days at the library, napping in the stacks. The simple rhyming text follows an abcb pattern and conveys the action clearly. The sing-song rhythm gives the story an old-fashioned feel that's complemented by Wilsdorf's appealing watercolor-and-collage illustrations of a small-town Main Street. Curious listeners may wonder about the noise that started Homer's adventure, as it is explained in neither text nor illustration. Touches of visual humor brighten the low-key tale and provide plenty of details to pore over. Homer is especially engaging, particularly on the endpapers, where he's shown in a variety of poses, almost always smiling widely. Pleasantly predictable, this quiet adventure breaks no new ground but offers a charming diversion for cat (and library) lovers. (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763634483
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 11/8/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 606,869
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.36 (w) x 10.94 (h) x 0.42 (d)

Meet the Author

Reeve Lindbergh

Reeve Lindbergh, the daughter of Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, has written many children's books, including NOBODY OWNS THE SKY, and MY LITTLE GRANDMOTHER OFTEN FORGETS, as well as several memoirs for adults. She lives in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom.

Anne Wilsdorf was born in Angola. She is the illustrator of many books for children, including DOGS ON THE BED by Elizabeth Bluemle. Anne Wilsdorf lives in Lausanne, Switzerland, where she teaches illustration.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Highly recommended

    Beautifully illustrated.
    Easy to read.
    Fun to read out loud.

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  • Posted December 20, 2011

    highly recommended

    As a retired first grade teacher, I love to find books to give as gifts that inspire an appreciation of literature This is a fun story of the kitty and the library - a wonderful read aloud also!! I am sure a child will want to name their tiger cat Homer after loving hearing this book .... Has adorable illustrations, short quick rhyme prose a winner of a gift for any age collection !

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