×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Homer's Odyssey
     

Homer's Odyssey

3.9 10
by Homer, Andrew Lang, S. H. Butcher
 

See All Formats & Editions

The Odyssey recounts the adventures of Odysseus on his way home to Ithaca after the Trojan War.

Although originally written in heroic verse, it has been called the first novel because of its exciting use of narrative and the effective use of flashbacks to heighten the dramatic action. While The Iliad is a collection of mythical material that grew up about an

Overview

The Odyssey recounts the adventures of Odysseus on his way home to Ithaca after the Trojan War.

Although originally written in heroic verse, it has been called the first novel because of its exciting use of narrative and the effective use of flashbacks to heighten the dramatic action. While The Iliad is a collection of mythical material that grew up about an event that seems actually to have occurred toward the end of the Mycenean era, the Odyssey is largely a collection of folk tales, many of which are easily recognizable in the legends of other lands.

We know very little about the author of The Odyssey and its companion tale, The Iliad. Most scholars agree that Homer was Greek; those who try to identify his origin on the basis of dialect forms in the poems tend to choose as his homeland either Smyrna, now the Turkish city known as Izmir, or Chios, an island in the eastern Aegean Sea. According to legend, Homer was blind, though scholarly evidence can neither confirm nor contradict the point.

The ongoing debate about who Homer was, when he lived, and even if he wrote The Odyssey and The Iliad is known as the "Homeric question." Classicists do agree that these tales of the fall of the city of Troy (Ilium) in the Trojan War (The Iliad) and the aftermath of that ten-year battle (The Odyssey) coincide with the ending of the Mycenaean period around 1200 BCE (a date that corresponds with the end of the Bronze Age throughout the Eastern Mediterranean). The Mycenaeans were a society of warriors and traders; beginning around 1600 BCE, they became a major power in the Mediterranean. Brilliant potters and architects, they also developed a system of writing known as Linear B, based on a syllabary, writing in which each symbol stands for a syllable.

Scholars disagree on when Homer lived or when he might have written The Odyssey. Some have placed Homer in the late-Mycenaean period, which means he would have written about the Trojan War as recent history. Close study of the texts, however, reveals aspects of political, material, religious, and military life of the Bronze Age and of the so-called Dark Age, as the period of domination by the less-advanced Dorian invaders who usurped the Mycenaeans is known. But how, other scholars argue, could Homer have created works of such magnitude in the Dark Age, when there was no system of writing? Herodotus, the ancient Greek historian, placed Homer sometime around the ninth century BCE, at the beginning of the Archaic period, in which the Greeks adopted a system of writing from the Phoenicians and widely colonized the Mediterranean. And modern scholarship shows that the most recent details in the poems are datable to the period between 750 and 700 BCE.

No one, however, disputes the fact that The Odyssey (and The Iliad as well) arose from oral tradition. Stock phrases, types of episodes, and repeated phrases -- such as "early, rose-fingered dawn" -- bear the mark of epic storytelling. Scholars agree, too, that this tale of the Greek hero Odysseus's journey and adventures as he returned home from Troy to Ithaca is a work of the greatest historical significance and, indeed, one of the foundations of Western literature.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940149672622
Publisher:
Enhanced E-Books
Publication date:
07/02/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
266
Sales rank:
1,356,228
File size:
384 KB

Meet the Author

S. H. Butcher

Samuel Henry Butcher was born in Dublin to Samuel Butcher, Bishop of Meath. John Butcher, 1st Baron Danesfort was his younger brother. He became an eminent classical scholar and, in his final years, an English politician. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge between 1869 and 1873 where he was Senior Classic and Chancellor's medalist. Elected fellow of Trinity in 1874, he left the college on his marriage, in 1876, to the daughter of Archbishop Trench. From 1876 to 1882 he was a fellow of University College, Oxford, and from 1882 to 1903 he became Professor of Greek at Edinburgh University. He was President of the British Academy, 1909-1910.

Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang (31 March 1844 � 20 July 1912) was a Scots poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology. He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales. The Andrew Lang lectures at the University of St Andrews are named after him.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Homer's Odyssey 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like so many of the free books available for the Nook, this book is poorly scanned & unreadable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love greek myths . I study it in school and was amased by the story. Me and my best friend john used to talk a lot about it . They were the best times always and forever
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Formatting looks fine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book didn't seem to start somewere, but apparently it did because twelve pages into it it I realized that it was acctually the story. There are copy right symbols throughout the whole book, and you can't understand it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago