Homework
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Homework

by Arthur Yorinks, Richard Egielski
     
 

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Just in time for the back-to-school season, this imaginative story captures every kid's wildest dream-homework that does itself!

When Tony falls asleep without finishing his homework, his unruly school tools come to life to get the job done. Pencil and Pen get the story started, along with Eraser, but when Fountain Pen joins in, all ink breaks loose! A little

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Overview

Just in time for the back-to-school season, this imaginative story captures every kid's wildest dream-homework that does itself!

When Tony falls asleep without finishing his homework, his unruly school tools come to life to get the job done. Pencil and Pen get the story started, along with Eraser, but when Fountain Pen joins in, all ink breaks loose! A little creativity goes a long way, as Tony's homework turns into a wacky tale about the Planet Splotch. Tony might not be able to hand in this particular assignment, but it deserves an A+ for originality.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
Odd purple shapes on the end pages may keep the reader wondering about their connection to the story about Tony and his homework assignment. The author and illustrator work together to present the story that has other layers to explore in a discussion. Before the text of the story begins, the brightly colored illustrations begin to foreshadow the story with Tony writing and thinking about a space story at school. When he gets home from school, Tony is absorbed in his comic book as he goes upstairs. Meanwhile, his mother reminds him to do his homework. Then, the reader enters Tony's world, where he appears to be totally drawn into his comic book and not in completing his homework. Sleep overtakes Tony, and another story emerges over at his desk. His pencil, eraser, and pens come to life and begin to draft a story. There is some bickering between the writing tools as they construct a story which is Tony's homework assignment. Readers may enjoy the multiple storylines and discussing their ideas about what can be inferred by the foreshadowing of the story and the animation of the writing tools. Was Tony asleep? What was actually happening? Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3–As usual, Tony is not doing his homework. Instead, he dozes off while reading a comic book. While he sleeps, the pencil, pens, etc., on his desk come to life and decide to write a story for him. There is much banter and arguing as each one is critical of the other’s contributions, but gradually everyone’s efforts are melded into a final product. Their exuberance awakens Tony, who discovers the story, but seeing only splotches and messy corrections, tosses it away–only to sit down and compose one with an identical theme. The plotline is amusing as the characters interact, but it’s Egielski’s retro-style illustrations that steal the show. Using brightly hued watercolors and pen, the artist brings the items on Tony’s desktop to life one by one. He then reverses the process as Tony awakens and the items go back to their inanimate state. The pictures are rich in detail and energy, and children will return to the story many times to enjoy them.–Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
Tony's homework routine consists of reading a comic book and falling asleep, and tonight's like any other-almost. "As Tony slept, his favorite #1 pencil decided to do Tony's homework," and once the pencil starts, all the other writing implements join in, with decidedly chaotic results when the fountain pen gets overexcited. As metafiction goes, this effort comes off as more contrived than clever. While kids will enjoy the squabbling of the pencil, pens and eraser, none of the characters is fully developed (and how many kids these days will recognize a fountain pen?), and the resolution, while satisfying enough (Tony gets a B), doesn't flow naturally from the setup. Tony wrote another draft; too bad his creators didn't do the same. (Picture book. 6-10)
From the Publisher

“The plotline is . . . The pictures are rich in detail and energy, and children will return to the story many times to enjoy them.” —School Library Journal

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802795854
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
07/07/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
874,704
Product dimensions:
8.74(w) x 11.22(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
AD410L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Arthur Yorinks has collaborated with Richard Egielski on nine picture books, including Louis the Fish and the Caldecott Medal winning Hey, Al as well as joining with Maurice Sendak and Matthew Reinhart to produce the 2006 bestseller Mommy. He is also the founder and director of Night Kitchen Radio Theater and has written and directed for opera, theater, dance, and film. Arthur lives in New York City.

Richard Egielski won the Caldecott Medal for his illustrations in Hey, Al and has written and illustrated many other books for children including Buz and Jazper, both New York Times Best Illustrated Books, Three Magic Balls, and The Gingerbread Boy. Richard lives in Milford, New Jersey, with his wife and son.

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