Honey from the Tombs

Honey from the Tombs

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by Amy Millan
     
 

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Amy Millan has already proven herself a talented indie pop singer with her bands Stars and Broken Social Scene, so the fact that her voice carries over so well to other genres should come as no surprise. In her debut solo album, Honey from the Tombs, Millan explores her folkier side, with songs (all ofSee more details below

Overview

Amy Millan has already proven herself a talented indie pop singer with her bands Stars and Broken Social Scene, so the fact that her voice carries over so well to other genres should come as no surprise. In her debut solo album, Honey from the Tombs, Millan explores her folkier side, with songs (all of which were written long before her Stars days) that tell tales of lost love and regret, an acoustic guitar and her own layered vocals her only constant companions. Not that the album is a lonely affair: Millan enlists plenty of help to help fill out her sound. There's guitar and vocal assistance from Dan and Jenny Whiteley (from Crazy Strings), as well as additional instrumentation from both sets of bandmates. But even though there's a certain lushness to the record, the words, and Millan's voice, are so forlorn that the overwhelming sentiment that comes through is loneliness, as if the players behind her are simply illusions, as if in fact she is there by herself. And it's this particular emotion that sits so calmly within the notes that makes Honey from the Tombs more than just another folk album. The songs themselves, if taken apart structurally, are no better and no worse than any other ones: they're musically sound but not extraordinary, and while there are some great, poetic lines, most of the actual power in Millan's work is from the sincerity in the simplicity of it all. "Singing's always easy when you're drinking," she admits, "So pour me up another before bed." She allows herself to show a weakness that's all too human, the weakness of old lovers who will never be forgotten, of distant memories still sharp like broken whiskey bottles. And it's precisely that weakness that makes Honey from the Tombs such a compelling and touching record. It doesn't have to be complicated by abstract imagery or unusual chords, because it already has everything it needs.

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Editorial Reviews

Rolling Stone - Lauren Gitlin
1/2 On her solo debut, Millan abandons the chamber pop of Stars in favor of earthy, down-home fingerpicking and hard-knock lyrics.
The Guardian - Betty Clarke
Millan has never sounded more enchanting or as exposed, oozing resignation as she relinquishes her grip in Losing You, woozily sinking to the bottom of a glass in Pour Me Up.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/22/2006
Label:
Arts & Crafts
UPC:
0060270062627
catalogNumber:
17
Rank:
347655

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Amy Millan   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals
Chris Quinn   Banjo
Ian Blurton   Bass,Guitar,Drums,Glockenspiel,Keyboards,Noise,Track Performer,Synthesizer Bass
Daniel Whiteley   Guitar,Mandolin,Background Vocals
Jenny Whiteley   Background Vocals
James Shaw   Trumpet
Chris Sands   Piano,Synthesizer Bass
Brendan Canning   Guitar,Piano
Charles Spearin   Bass
Evan Cranley   Dobro,Trombone,Background Vocals,Guitar Loops
Chris Seligman   French Horn
Kevin Drew   Drums,Keyboards
Mark Roy   Guitar
Dan Whiteley   Guitar

Technical Credits

Ian Blurton   Arranger,Producer
Amy Millan   Composer
Rachelle Dupéré   Art Direction

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