Honey of a Day

Honey of a Day

by Janet Perry Marshall
     
 

Using her trademark cut-paper illustrations and ingeniously playing with the names of twenty-six wildflowers, Janet Marshall has cultivated a woodland cast of animal characters and a one-of-a-kind wedding ceremony between sweet William and black-eyed Susan—and you're invited! Clever wordplay fun and a humorous introduction to nature's treasure trove of flowers… See more details below

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Overview

Using her trademark cut-paper illustrations and ingeniously playing with the names of twenty-six wildflowers, Janet Marshall has cultivated a woodland cast of animal characters and a one-of-a-kind wedding ceremony between sweet William and black-eyed Susan—and you're invited! Clever wordplay fun and a humorous introduction to nature's treasure trove of flowers make for a picture book that blooms all year round.

Author Biography: In A Honey of a Day, Janet Marshall ingeniously plays with the names of no less than twenty-eight wildflowers. "Since I was a child I have been intrigued with wildflowers and the wonderful possibilities their names held," she says. Janet Marshall is also the author-artist of Banana Moon and Look Once, Look Twice (Ticknor & Fields). She has four grown children and lives with her husband, Colin, in Hingham, Massachusetts (not far from the famous wildflower preserve, Garden in the Woods, in the town of Faringham).

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Marshall (Banana Moon) plants the names of 28 wildflowers in this tale of a forest wedding, while her dynamic cut-paper collages imply the relationship between specific flowers and the objects for which they are named. Thus, as the story begins, "Trumpets blared, bluebells rang, and blue flags waved." Robins hold trumpets, a squirrel waves blue pennants and blue bells peal; while below, these three types of wildflowers, clearly labeled, flourish. The narrative feels fluid even with so many allusions: "At four-o'clock Jack-in-the-pulpit, the preacher, looking smart in his bishop's cap, raised his goldenrod to welcome [the guests]." Wisely, the illustrations don't force the resemblance between wildflower and namesake; instead, children will be intrigued to find the similarities for themselves. Not all the naming devices become apparent (e.g., the casting of the brown bear groom as Sweet William sheds no light on why a flower would have this name). However, kids lucky enough to know their wildflowers will enjoy the wordplay; kids less bent toward horticulture will be tickled to learn of flowers called four-o'clock, marsh mallow and butter-and-eggs. On the whole, this exercise comes up roses. Ages 4-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Everyone is present on this bright, sunny day as sweet William and black-eyed Susan gather before the preacher, Jack-in-the-pulpit, to be married. Through rhythmic text and glowing illustrations, readers see 28 wildflowers, in picture and in person. Lily of the valley is the maid of honor and Pussy willow, "clad in a blue bonnet and carrying a shepherd's purse," is the flower girl. It's a clever way to combine an introduction to wildflowers with a charming story. Most of the art appears on green or blue double-page spreads, and the flowers are shown in their botanical state as well as in their personifications. Endpapers display all of the wildflowers included. Early childhood teachers may want to use this as a virtual field trip, followed by a nature walk. Families will enjoy it for one-on-one sharing.-Joyce Rice, Limestone Creek Elementary School, Jupiter, FL Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
A host of wild animals attends the wedding of two bears set among the abundant wildflowers that have inspired this story. Marshall (Banana Moon, 1998, etc.) constructs a story out of the names of wildflowers, i.e., "Trumpets blared, bluebells rang, and blue flags waved. . . . Jack-in-the-pulpit, the preacher, looking smart in his bishop's cap, raised his goldenrod to welcome [the guests]." All the denizens in the forest join together to help celebrate the wedding of their friends, Sweet William and black-eyed-Susan. Jack-in-the-pulpit, an owl, is the preacher; Johnny-jump-up, a rabbit, is the best man; Pussy willow (a cat, of course) is the flower girl and so on. Rose petals are thrown at the happy couple, the wedding feast consists of butter-and-eggs and marsh mallows (yes, those are wildflowers, too) and tea is served in buttercups. Unfortunately, neither the story nor the illustrations are very appealing. The cut paper illustrations are unattractively flat and overly busy, with colors that jar. The layout of each page is too uniform—each is a two-page full-bleed spread with a solid background color, with little variation in the display of the text. Even the endpapers, with individual pictures of each wildflower in octagonal frames, are drab. A clever idea, but one that is unsuccessfully executed. (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688169176
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/01/2000
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.33(w) x 10.31(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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