Honeysuckle House

( 2 )

Overview


"The class is so quiet you can hear Tina's hard shoe soles on the floor. Everyone is watching us. Sisters, they are thinking."

Ten-year-old Sarah misses her best friend and neighbor, Victoria, terribly. She still waits for her in the backyard just in case she comes back. The last thing Sarah needs is to be paired with the new girl at school, Tina, who has just arrived from China. Sarah is used to being confused with other Asian students at school, but she doesn't want people to assume that she and Tina have a ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $2.00   
  • New (8) from $5.81   
  • Used (8) from $2.00   
Honeysuckle House

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.95
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview


"The class is so quiet you can hear Tina's hard shoe soles on the floor. Everyone is watching us. Sisters, they are thinking."

Ten-year-old Sarah misses her best friend and neighbor, Victoria, terribly. She still waits for her in the backyard just in case she comes back. The last thing Sarah needs is to be paired with the new girl at school, Tina, who has just arrived from China. Sarah is used to being confused with other Asian students at school, but she doesn't want people to assume that she and Tina have a lot in common. In fact, even simple communication is hard for them: Tina's English is poor, and Sarah doesn't speak a word of Chinese. Thrown together amidst a swirl of problems at home and at school, Sarah and Tina are reluctant to forge a friendship. But both of them must come to terms with the changes in their lives—whether they are able to overcome their differences or not.

Andrea Cheng has remained true to the hearts and voices of two ten-year-old girls in this moving story about friendship.

Told in alternating stories and in the innocent voices of two ten year old girls, Honeysuckle House addresses alienation, longing, prejudice, and cultural differences without ever losing touch with the true preoccupations of childhood.

An all-American girl with Chinese ancestors and a new immigrant from China find little in common when they meet in their fourth grade classroom, but they are both missing their best friends and soon discover other connections.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

* "With a smoothly drawn and interesting plot, strong characters, and graceful writing, the story has more immediacy than much realistic contemporary fiction." --School Library Journal, starred review

"This deft character-driven story about two ten-year-old girls rings with clarity. . . . Honesty and subtlety co-exist in Cheng's thoughtful, never-didactic writing." --Kirkus Reviews

"This will satisfy readers not quite ready for An Na's immigrant drama Step From Heaven, or those simply looking for a different take on the old story of new friendship." --Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Publishers Weekly
Alternating between the perspectives of two fourth-grade narrators, Cheng (Marika) proves herself a gifted and sympathetic observer of middle-graders' conflicts and concerns. In the opening chapter, Sarah tries to make sense of the news from her best friend and next-door neighbor, Victoria, that she is moving. Victoria's mother isn't reliable, there's no moving van, and Victoria doesn't know where they're going. But that afternoon Victoria and her mom leave, with some but not all of their things. At school Sarah feels bereaved and alarmed when Victoria's seat gets filled by a new girl, Tina, just arrived from China. Sarah, who is Chinese-American, steels herself: "I'll have to tell everyone all over again I don't speak Chinese." Tina brings her voice to the next chapter, describing her trip from Shanghai to join her parents in America. Cheng uses perceptive details to highlight the enormity of the adjustments Tina must make. Separated from her mother for more than a year, Tina almost doesn't recognize her because her smell has changed her soft perfume has been replaced by an alien scent. "When I smelled the sharp soap," Tina says, she finally understands why her grandmother has told her to be brave. Both Tina and Sarah must come to terms with classmates and teachers who assume that their Chinese facial features confer automatic intimacy and affection, allowing Cheng to make important points about assimilation and prejudice. Eventually, however, the mystery of Victoria's disappearance opens a path for the two girls to channel their feelings of loss and, in the process, create a genuine friendship. Ages 10-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
From The Critics
People are more alike than different. The reader is engaged through the use of two 10- year-old narrators, Sarah and Tiang, who relate the story in alternating chapters. Sarah, a Chinese American who does not speak any Chinese, is coping with the loss of her best friend, as well as her father's job which requires him to be absent from home for extended periods of time. Tiang, a Chinese girl, enters Sarah's school and is upset with her new surroundings, her father's endeavors to get a green card, and adapting to a new school. Paired together by their teacher, the two girls strive to find mutual ground for understanding. They not only have to work through their problems, but they also must deal with the stereotyping by others. When they eventually open up to each other, they find that there is a basis for friendship. 2004, Front Street, 136 pp., Ages young adult.
—Joy Frerichs
Children's Literature
Sarah, a Chinese-American fourth grader, is going through a tough time. Her best friend has moved away. Her father is away on business more than he is at home. And she is tired of hearing classmates assume she can speak Chinese just because she looks Chinese. Ting is a Chinese girl, who has just moved to Ohio from China to join her parents. She is placed in Sarah's class, much to Sarah's dismay. "Why couldn't the new girl join the other fourth grade class?... Is it because I am Chinese that they picked Miss Renfro's?" When her teacher introduces Ting to the class, the boy behind Sarah whispers, "Looks just like you,... Is she your cousin?" It seems that Ting is missing a lot about her life in China, including her best friend there. Slowly, a friendship between Ting and Sarah evolves. This friendship does not displace the girls' feelings for their distant friends, but it does help fill some of the lonely void in their lives. Sarah's relationship with her father improves too, after a violent storm threatens the family. Father is away on business as usual, and can't make it home because of the storm. He tells Sarah once he makes it home: "All I could think of was how much I wanted to get home and see all of you." This doesn't make things right, but it offers some hope for their relationship in the future. The chapters alternate between Sarah's and Ting's stories. Life is somewhat bleak for both girls when the book begins. The feelings and dialogue of these characters ring true for readers. Children will empathize with the feelings of loneliness and isolation felt by the girls at various times. The plot ends on a hopeful note for both Sarah and Ting. This book offers insight on theexperiences of immigrant children beginning school in the United States, where friends, relatives, places, and their familiar language are all left behind. 2004, Front Street, Ages 8 to 13.
—Jeanne K. Pettenati, J.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-The honeysuckle house (a spot under a large honeysuckle bush) is where fourth-grader Sarah, a Chinese-American girl, plays with her friend Victoria until the girl suddenly moves away. Sarah's story is juxtaposed with her classmate Ting's, a new immigrant from China. Told in first person in alternating chapters, the narratives balance well between large issues (like Ting's parents' employment and legal problems and Victoria's abrupt departure) and more intimate ones (people assume that Sarah can speak Chinese, and Ting has to adjust to all of the new smells in America). With a smoothly drawn and interesting plot, strong characters, and graceful writing, the story has more immediacy than much realistic contemporary fiction. There are some truly memorable scenes, such as when Ting and Sarah explore Victoria's deserted house, and when Ting breaks a vase in the house where her mother cleans. With a strong social conscience behind it as well, this absorbing novel has a lot going for it.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This deft character-driven story about two ten-year-old girls rings with clarity. Sarah's devastated when her best friend Victoria suddenly and mysteriously moves away-where has she gone? Will she be back? The honeysuckle house in the backyard, where they played daily, is bereft without her. Slowly, Sarah gets to know Ting, a girl at school who's just arrived from Shanghai. In this Cincinnati where "China, Japan, Africa" are "all the same. . . . Faraway places with funny-looking people," teachers confuse Sarah and Ting, never absorbing that Sarah is Chinese-American and doesn't even speak Chinese. Kids tease and isolate Ting. Chapters vary Sarah and Ting's distinct points of view as the two creep toward a friendship that, rather than forgetting Victoria, honors and includes her even in her absence. This is really the story of all three girls, as well as their families, each with its own pains and strengths. Honesty and subtlety co-exist in Cheng's thoughtful, never-didactic writing. (Fiction. 9-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590786321
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 136
  • Sales rank: 941,810
  • Age range: 11 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author


Andrea Cheng teaches English as a second language in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she lives with her husband and three children. Honeysuckle House is based in part on the experiences of her children. She is also the author of the novels Marika, The Lace Dowry, Eclipse, and The Bear Makers.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    Boring

    This book was the boringest book I've ever read. It was a very slow read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Best Book Ever!

    lgoghgijgbijgbijgberij sdkjnerkjqgbelr veni[ugvuririruiqw

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)