Hooey Higgins and the Shark

Hooey Higgins and the Shark

by Steve Voake, Emma Dodson
     
 
Meet Hooey Higgins — along with his oddball family and friends — in a laugh-out-loud madcap adventure loaded with boy appeal.

Hooey Higgins is desperately in love — with the humongous chocolate egg in Mr. Danson’s store window, that is. Too bad he and his best friend, Twig, have nowhere near enough money to buy it. But when a shark is

Overview

Meet Hooey Higgins — along with his oddball family and friends — in a laugh-out-loud madcap adventure loaded with boy appeal.

Hooey Higgins is desperately in love — with the humongous chocolate egg in Mr. Danson’s store window, that is. Too bad he and his best friend, Twig, have nowhere near enough money to buy it. But when a shark is spotted off the coast, Hooey and Twig dream up a plan: capture the shark and charge people to view it. Brilliant! With Hooey’s older brother masterminding the foolproof scheme, they set off with ketchup, a cricket bat, a floral quilt, and a rope in tow. What they find is so amazing it blows the shark plan out of the water! Aided by Emma Dodson’s comical illustrations, Steve Voake introduces a hilarious new character in a fast-paced story kids will sink their teeth into.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Already an established series figure in Britain, Hooey appears here in his American debut, and readers who speed through this fast and funny read will hope that more installments quickly become available. Voake’s text is both lively and wry and his characters are fresh and believable. Dodson’s numerous monochromatic ink and gouache illustrations are equally original. Although this has broad appeal, it might be a particularly good choice for the boys goofing off in the back of the room.
—The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
With its droll British humor, young readers should really enjoy Hooey Higgins and his multigenerational family and friends. Hooey (the source of his name is revealed about half way through the book) and his friend Twig lust after a big chocolate egg in Mr. Danson's shop window. The price is astronomical as far as the boys' means are concerned so they dream up ways to make money. Rumor has it that there is a shark in near the beach and they want to capture it and charge admission to see it. Their efforts are quite amusing. While trying to capture the shark they spot what appears to be a huge sea urchin and decide that this could be a moneymaker too. Hooey is aided in his exploits by his older brother Will and we also meet his nemesis Bazzer and Twig's heartthrob Samantha. The plot gets more complicated and convoluted and the story ends with a bang. All the loose ends are tied up and it may be that the shark has the last laugh. The illustrations are as amusing as the text and they have a cartoon look. Readers will appreciate that they are liberally sprinkled through the book which will make it even more appealing to younger readers and those who may not be reading on grade level. Let's hope that there will be more adventures with Hooey, because this first story is really amusing. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Hooey Higgins spies a giant chocolate egg in the window of the candy shop and wants it more than anything. It costs 65 pounds, but he only has some spare change. When his grandfather tells him about the shark in the water near their town, Hooey, his older brother, and his friend Twig decide to capture the animal and charge people money to see it. Armed with a cricket bat and a bottle of ketchup, they set out for the shore. What they encounter is much more than they could have imagined. Readers will encounter British terms such as "wellies" and "blimey." The humorous illustrations complement the funny tone of the narrative. Hooey's entertaining antics explode in a rather delicious ending.—Kris Hickey, Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
Best friends Hooey and Twig go to great lengths to raise money to buy a giant chocolate egg. Mr. Danson wants to raise money to build a new shop window with his name etched into it, like a "true chocolatier." Hooey and Twig just want his enormous oeuf en chocolat, which sports an equally oversized price tag. Being 8-year-olds, they are willing to take on the fundraising challenge, coming up with one plan after another. First, they try to catch a shark for the reward that they imagine will follow. While spilling ketchup to attract the shark, Hooey discovers a giant sea urchin and comes up with a plot to charge folks to see it. Things never go the way they are supposed to, of course, and the urchin proves to be more than the boys can handle. Over-the-top situations are matched perfectly with exaggerated black-and-white illustrations. Anything that skinny, spiky-haired Hooey doesn't want to do will be embraced by big-eared Twig, including wearing a sandwich board and gluing straws in his hair to mimic a sea urchin. Mix in some underwear, a World War II sea mine and old guys wearing the Union Jack on their swim trunks, and you've got a romp that might just drag a few eyes away from the Wimpy Kid books. Fast-paced fun. (Chapter book. 7-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763657826
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
04/24/2012
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
793,038
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
650L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Steve Voake is the author of the Daisy Dawson books as well as two books for older readers. He lives in Somerset, England.

Emma Dodson is the author-illustrator of Speckle the Spider. She lives in Surrey, England.

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