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Hootie & The Blowfish
     

Hootie & The Blowfish

4.1 6
by Hootie & the Blowfish
 
To paraphrase "Turn! Turn! Turn!," there's a time for adventure and a time for comfort -- and when the emotional clock rolls around to the latter, these Carolinians deliver exactly what's needed. Not much has changed in Hootie-ville over the years -- even given a four-year hiatus -- but then again, granny's mashed potatoes never needed any tinkering with, either. The

Overview

To paraphrase "Turn! Turn! Turn!," there's a time for adventure and a time for comfort -- and when the emotional clock rolls around to the latter, these Carolinians deliver exactly what's needed. Not much has changed in Hootie-ville over the years -- even given a four-year hiatus -- but then again, granny's mashed potatoes never needed any tinkering with, either. The band's first studio effort since 1998's Musical Chairs places Darius Rucker's mellifluous baritone in its customary front-and-center position, all the better to imbue songs like "Innocence" and "Deeper Side" with a misty-eyed blend of melancholy and hopefulness. Power ballads dominate the set, but the subtle production tweaks imparted by Don Was tone down the jangle in favor of a more spacious overall tone. That comes through just as much on the set's more up-tempo numbers, particularly the country-fried "Little Darlin," which allows drummer Jim Sonnefeld to kick up his heels a bit. Feeling the need for a little help from their friends, the band called in Susan Cowsill and Vicki Peterson of the Continental Drifters for a cover of that band's "Rain Song," as well as Indigo Girl Emily Saliers, who provides a nice foil for Rucker on "When She's Done."

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Rick Anderson
It's been five years since listeners last heard from Hootie & the Blowfish (not counting 2000's odds-and-ends assortment Scattered, Smothered and Covered), and those who might have been expecting a dramatic departure from the radio-friendly guitar rock of the band's previous three regular albums will be either relieved or disappointed, depending on how they felt about it to begin with. But make no mistake: Those who accuse this band of being lightweight and terminally poppy are not only missing the point, they are also giving in to the worst kind of rock & roll snobbery -- the kind that says pop music really ought to be anything other than fun. On the other hand, those who accuse frontman Darius Rucker of sometimes delivering his lightweight, poppy songs with a bombast that is all out of proportion to their substance are actually onto something: Just consider the chesty roar with which he delivers couplets about, for example, minor domestic and emotional discomfort ("You need a little space/And I need mine"). But unlike Bono or Creed's Scott Stapp, Rucker's mistake is not in taking himself or his lyrics too seriously; it's just that that's the way he sings everything, and that big, chesty roar is a big part of what makes him fun to listen to. Mainly, of course, what make him fun to listen to are his songs' irresistible hooks, and this album has those in spades: "Deeper Side," the country-inflected "Little Darlin'" (which cries out to be covered by the Blasters), and a respectful cover version of the Continental Drifters' "Rain Song" are all perfect for singing along with in the car, while "Tears Fall Down" and the power ballad "Innocence" should have even the most jaded power pop snob digging in his jeans for a lighter. They're not trying to save the world, folks -- this is just rock & roll. And most people who say they don't like it are kidding themselves.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/04/2003
Label:
Warner Bros Mod Afw
UPC:
0075678356421
catalogNumber:
83564
Rank:
17024

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Hootie & The Blowfish 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a phat cd! It's got all my favorite tracks from the band's hip hop days. This one is off da hook! It's gonna tear up FM radio!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hootie and the blowfish waited five years to release this CD? What were they thinking! I have been a Hootie and the Blowfish fan since there first CD Cracked Rear View. I have purchased every CD they created, and this last one was by and far the worst. The songs were boreing and weak. How many times can you sing about "feelings" and "tears". There was not one good fast paced song on the entire track. Most of the songs were slow paced to begin with, and they sucked. I keep thinking Hootie and the Blowfish will find the magic that showed up in Cracked Rear View. I guess I'll keep looking.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's hard for me to say this, but I think this one is my favorite. Classic Hootie style, great music, lyrics to believe in.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rick and the boys are back again with this long awaited for release. Having lost two of the the four founding members to a river boat accident, the group remains amazingly resilient and maintains the same slickness that brought them to the top of the charts back in 97. While this album still has the traditional Blowfish sound, the new rhythm section adds a bit of a hard driving backbone to these pop classics (or soon to be). Head's up, because ain't no one here getting out alive! That's right, they pay a tribute to Walt Whitman on their bopping cover of "Over the Old Smokey River". Now, you can't shake a stick at that! Rock and Roll radio is going to eat this one alive when they hear the country rock tune, "Who's got egg on their face this time?". Buck up, Jack, and hit the pavement cuz you better be ready for some true party favorites. This one's gonna put you in the headlock with the catchy hooks and slappy songwriting.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There has been such a musical drought over the past few years, save the few mainstream saviours like DMB or Counting Crows, & all the unsung heroes playing the underground scene for a few dollars & a few fans. This opens up with "Deeper Side", & you take a deep breath & know that absence has made the heart grow fonder. "Innocence" has to be one of the best songs the band has ever recorded. The layers of strings & thick, haunting guitar make this a great late-night driving song. "The Rain Song", Peter Holsapple (C.D.) would be proud, this song has a different feel from the rest of the project, & that may be its appeal. "When She's Gone" brings back the side of Musical Chairs that so many hardcore Hoot-sters love to hear. And "Alright", this song deserves to be on the main project, but almost leaves something to be enjoyed,& is Hootie in a nut shell. Way to go, guys!
Guest More than 1 year ago
They are back with and upgraded. It's the old them with new tunes. Innocence should get an award. Can't wait to go see them live.