Horace and Morris Join the Chorus (But What About Dolores?)

Horace and Morris Join the Chorus (But What About Dolores?)

by James Howe, Amy Walrod
     
 

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Horace and Morris, but mostly Dolores, are back again for another uproarious adventure. When the three best friends decide to try out for the school chorus together, they're shocked when Dolores (who can only sing notes that no one has ever heard before) is the only one who doesn't make the cut. After all, they've always done everything together.
Once Horace

Overview

Horace and Morris, but mostly Dolores, are back again for another uproarious adventure. When the three best friends decide to try out for the school chorus together, they're shocked when Dolores (who can only sing notes that no one has ever heard before) is the only one who doesn't make the cut. After all, they've always done everything together.
Once Horace and Morris start chorus practice, they're so busy that they don't have time to go exploring or climb trees with Dolores anymore. Feeling left out and alone, Dolores decides to take matters into her own hands. But can she prove to Moustro Provolone that there's a place for every kind of voice in the chorus?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this sympathetic follow-up to Horace and Morris but Mostly Dolores, Howe and Walrod depict a girl mouse's frustrated singing attempts and leaven it with humor. "Horace and Morris but mostly Dolores loved to sing." When they make music, Horace hits "the high notes." Morris provides "the low notes." Dolores, whose voice-bubble "La la la" is inscribed in a wavery line, sings "notes no one had ever heard before." No one minds, least of all Dolores, until she suggests the three audition for Moustro Provolone, a choral director with an artistic curl in his mustache and a collection of metronomes and record players. Aspiring performers will share Dolores's painful shock at the call-back sheet: "Horace. Morris. Chloris. Gus." Where other authors might show a child finding consolation in a different talent, Howe takes the difficult route. Dolores adores singing and rebuffs a pal's patronizing remark that "the audience is important too." In a kindly resolution that calls to mind Kevin Henkes's deft handling of grade-school matters, Dolores pens an imploring note to the Moustro, who raves at her rhymes: "This would make a great song!... Of course you must be in the chorus to sing it." Dolores gets lessons, and Walrod's endearingly odd acrylics picture the tin-eared chanteuse trying her best among her pearly-toothed peers. Howe and Walrod never treat success as a given and, as in the previous book, they suggest persistence serves a mouse well. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A touching and funny sequel to Horace and Morris but Mostly Dolores (Atheneum, 1999). When the three mice friends try out for chorus, Dolores, who often sings "notes no one had ever heard before" doesn't make the cut. She writes a pleading letter in rhyme to Moustro Provolone, asking him to reconsider his decision. He decides that the letter would make great lyrics to put to music, and, of course, Dolores must help sing it. He concludes that, "-everyone has a place in the chorus. Some singers just need a little more help." Walrod gets an astonishing amount of expression into the characters' faces, and their strong friendship as well as a satisfying ending make this tale a winner.-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL
Kirkus Reviews
Moustro Provolone welcomes Horace and Morris into his new chorus, but Dolores, the sparkplug of the trio introduced in Horace and Morris, But Mostly Dolores (1999) doesn't make the cut-perhaps because she belts out "notes no one had ever heard before." Is she angry? And how-but after discovering that playing alone while her buds are at practice isn't much fun, she pens an appeal so eloquent-"Who tells a bird she shouldn't be heard? Singing is just what birds do! So please take my word-I'm a lot like a bird. I have to sing out loud and true!"-that the Moustro is compelled to put it to music for the chorus (and Dolores) to sing. Walrod differentiates each member of her nearly identical, all-rodent cast with small identifying accessories, but uses wide gestures and big dialogue balloons to capture both Dolores's outrage, and her larger-than-life personality. Though Horace and Morris are largely placeholders here, fans will welcome the triumphant return of this adventure-loving threesome. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689839399
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
10/01/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,133,287
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD430L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

James Howe is the author of more than ninety books for young readers, including the modern classic Bunnicula and its highly popular sequels. In 2001, Howe published The Misfits, the story of four outcast seventh-graders who try to end name-calling in their school. The Misfits is now widely read and studied in middle schools throughout the country, and was the inspiration for the national movement known as No Name-Calling Week (NoNameCallingWeek.org), an event observed by thousands of middle and elementary schools annually. There are three companion novels to The Misfits: Totally Joe (2005), Addie on the Inside (2011), and Also Known as Elvis (2014). Howe’s many other books for children from preschool through teens frequently deal with the acceptance of difference and being true to oneself. Visit him online at JamesHowe.com.

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